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For the Record – Nov. 24, 2022

For the Record provides postings of appointment, committee, grant, award, and other notices set out by collective agreements and university policies and processes. It is the university’s primary vehicle for sharing this information with our community.

Submit For the Record information for posting to Gazette editor Andrew Carroll.

COMMITTEES

Selection Committee appointed for Head, Department of French Studies

Johanne Bénard’s term as Acting Head of the Department of French Studies is scheduled to end on June 30, 2023. The Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) has appointed a Selection Committee to advise on the appointment of the next head. The Selection Committee has the following membership:

Elected Members

  • Francesca Fiore, Assistant Professor, Department of French Studies
  • Julien Lefort-Favreau, Associate Professor, Department of French Studies
  • Michael Reyes, Associate Professor, Department of French Studies
  • Isabelle St-Amand, Assistant Professor, Department of French Studies
  • Chloé Savoie-Bernard, Assistant Professor, Department of French Studies

Appointed Members

  • Christiane Arndt, Cognate Faculty. Professor, Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures
  • Agathe Nicholson, Departmental Administrator
  • Joahua Marasigan, Undergraduate Student, Department of French Studies
  • Stéfanie von Hlatky (Chair), Associate Dean, Faculty of Arts and Science
  • Kim Bellefontaine (Secretary) Faculty of Arts and Science

Pursuant to Articles 41.3 and 41.3.6 of the Collective Agreement between Queen’s University Faculty Association and Queen’s University at Kingston, I invite your comments on the present state and future prospects of the Department of French Studies by noon on Jan. 13, 2022.

Names of possible candidates may also be submitted. Please send all comments, in confidence, to the attention of Kim Bellefontaine. All letters will be reviewed by the Selection Committee and will become part of the record of decision-making.

At the request of either the department members or the committee, a meeting can be arranged between the department and the committee to ascertain the department’s views on the qualities of a head. Once a short list has been established, it will be distributed to members of the department for further input on the merits of the respective candidate(s).

Queen’s United Way campaign at 96 per cent of fundraising target

The Queen’s United Way campaign has reached the 96 per cent mark with the Queen’s community so far donating $454,933 toward the overall goal of $475,000.

The biggest workplace campaign for the United Way of Kingston, Frontenac, Lennox and Addington the Queen’s campaign accounts for more than 10 per cent of overall target of $3,808,000.

The funds raised helped the United Way as it assisted nearly 74,000 members of the community – single parents, abused women, families, young children and teenagers, the elderly, the physically challenged, the homeless, and more – via a network of agencies and programs.

Queen’s staff, faculty, and retirees are leaders in the community having the largest workplace and retiree campaign within the region. A recent report by Deloitte showed that Queen’s community members annually raise well over $1 million to support local causes while students put in thousands of volunteer hours with local agencies and programs

To join the campaign and donate, visit the Queen’s United Way site and follow the instructions. Previous donors who have accepted automatic renewal can also use this link to increase their annual pledge.

Thrive Week 2022 brings happiness and joy

  • First place - Kari Knowles
    First place - Kari Knowles
  • Second place - Brandi Wilkes
    Second place - Brandi Wilkes
  • Third place - Nathalie Brown
    Third place - Nathalie Brown

Earlier this fall, several events were held as part of Thrive – a week-long series aimed at building positive mental health and wellness through discussion, learning, skill development, and resource sharing. This year’s events focused on the key concepts of happiness and joy.

In total, 37 events were offered from Oct. 31 to Nov. 4, with over 700 registered participants in attendance including staff, faculty, and students. Events were offered both virtually and in-person for the first time since 2019.

Some of the popular events included keynote speaker Dr. Gillian Mandich, an award-winning, internationally recognized happiness researcher, educator, and author, as well as the Rewilding Panel Discussion which highlighted rewilding efforts taking place in Kingston, Amherst Island, and Bader College.

Initial feedback from the events has been overwhelmingly positive, with one participant saying they “appreciate the variety of programing” and “love to learn more about the cool stuff that happens on campus.” Other participants have noted that Thrive programming throughout the year would be helpful, something that the Employee Wellness Services team is working towards for 2023.

“We want to ensure everyone can access and enjoy Thrive events, and that means shifting our focus to more year-round programming,” says Greg Simmons, Wellness and Engagement Coordinator, Employee Wellness Services. “We have some exciting projects lined up for next year that we look forward to sharing with the Queen’s community and continue to develop programming on an ongoing basis.”

Throughout Thrive Week, a number of contests were also held with several awards going to deserving participants including:

  • Roda Mendoza, winner of the scavenger hunt
  • Holly Shepard, winner of the individual Halloween Costume Contest
  • Kari Knowles, Brandy Wilkes, and Nathalie Brown placing first, second, and third respectively in the annual Thrive photo contest

If you participated in any of the Thrive events, we want to hear from you! All participants are invited to submit their feedback by completing a brief online survey. The results from the survey will be reviewed by the Employee Wellness Services unit and will help shape future wellness events and opportunities. The survey closes December 7, 2022.

You can learn more about Thrive by visiting the HR Intranet.

Marking the first anniversary of the Scarborough Charter

The following message was shared by Principal and Vice-Chancellor Patrick Deane with the Queen’s community on Friday, Nov. 18:

I am writing to you today to acknowledge an important milestone for the university - one year ago, Queen’s became a signatory to the Scarborough Charter on Anti-Black Racism and Black Inclusion in Canadian Higher Education. The Charter is a call to action prompting the adoption of practices that will foster Black Flourishing, Inclusive Excellence, Mutuality, and Accountability. Over 40 colleges and universities have signed the Charter and pledged to implement the principles it articulates. It is imperative that as an institution, we take this commitment seriously and ensure that our pledge is realized in action. 

Our commitment to making Queen’s an inclusive community has never been stronger. We continue to build on the work of the Black community and all marginalized communities who, since the establishment of the university, have led efforts to make Queen’s a place of welcome. Adopting the Scarborough Charter involves acknowledging the considerable intellectual, political, economic and cultural contributions Black students, staff, and faculty make to society. At Queen’s, this also means acknowledging Black community contributions to the flourishing of the university of which they have been a vital part since its earliest beginnings. We must address the fact that these contributions to the university have not been well supported; they have developed in the face of systemic racism and in spite of the institution, not because of it. As a Charter signatory, we commit to ending anti-Black racism and honouring ongoing work in support of Black thriving as part of the institutional mission itself. In this, we all have a role to play.  

Since our signing of the Charter last year, a number of significant events have taken place: 

  • Following the first meeting of the Inter-Institutional Forum in May 2022, four Queen’s working groups - addressing areas of Research, Community Engagement, Black Community Representation and Inclusion, and Teaching, Learning, and Student Success – began reviewing institutional programs and practices to identify our strengths and gaps in relation to the Charter. You can learn more about the working groups here
  • We are fostering closer relationships with Black student organizations and learning how to better recognize and resource the critical work they do to create safe and supportive spaces for their peers and in furtherance of the university’s decolonial and anti-racist mission. 
  • On Oct. 21, I was privileged to attend the inauguration event for Black Studies at Queen’s. The establishment of the Black Studies minor is the result of the efforts of many Black students, staff, and faculty over several years and the university is fortunate to be home to this program.  Its emphasis on liberation, accountability, creativity, and cooperation - foundational to the discipline of Black Studies itself – will provide a strong anchor for Queen’s advancement of Charter commitments, as well as to intersecting Indigenization and anti-oppression initiatives. 
  • Across the post-secondary sector, work continues on the development of a Secretariat that will support the work of the Inter Institutional Steering Committee and foster the development of sound practices promoting Black inclusion. We feel privileged to be part of a pan-institutional Scarborough Charter community and anticipate future opportunities to participate in rich, collaborative conversation with sector colleagues. 

I look forward to further discussion with community members about a plan to build on our strengths, address gaps, and embed the Charter’s commitments into our institutional mission. Embracing the Charter is not merely a task to be completed but rather, an ethic which must be woven into our everyday actions and the fabric of our community. The Charter is leading the way for us in creating real and sustainable change, enabling us to be the institution we aspire to be – one that welcomes and celebrates all of its members and provides a home for diverse intellectual thought, growth, innovation and positive impact. 

Patrick Deane
Principal and Vice-Chancellor

Celebrating Chancellor Murray Sinclair’s installation

Special ceremony marks Chancellor Sinclair’s 2021 appointment and celebrates Indigenous culture.

Chancellor Murray Sinclair

The Honourable Murray Sinclair was named Queen’s University’s 15th Chancellor in April 2021 but, due to the pandemic and illness, an official installation event was not held. That changed on Nov. 15, 2022, when Chancellor Sinclair was formally installed in a special hybrid ceremony broadcasted online from campus’ Isabel Bader Centre for the Performing Arts.

“Queen’s is very fortunate to have His Honour, Mr. Murray Sinclair, serve as our university’s highest officer and ceremonial head,” says Patrick Deane, Principal and Vice-Chancellor, who presided over the ceremony from The Isabel’s main stage. “His contributions to the betterment of our social fabric in Canada are formidable, and since joining us as Chancellor in 2021 he’s been working closely with the university to advance positive change here as well. It is a pleasure to celebrate his installation and a privilege to welcome him as our 15th Chancellor.”

During the installation ceremony, Chancellor Sinclair — who is the first Indigenous person to serve in this role at Queen’s — donned his official, traditional robe, which he wore together with an Ojibwe Woodland-style beaded stole and a fur turban. He addressed attendees virtually from the Manitoba Indigenous Cultural Education Centre in Winnipeg.

“Being installed as the university’s 15th Chancellor means a great deal to me and my commitment to Queen’s is one that I feel wholeheartedly,” remarked Chancellor Sinclair, after taking his oath of office. “For too long, we have educated young people to believe in a history that is not accurate; one that is incomplete. In this role, I look forward to helping ensure that the experience our students receive is fully inclusive of an understanding of Canada’s past. Things are changing, and universities in Canada must now lead the way toward positive change.”

Chancellor Sinclair is a nationally recognized figure, having dedicated 40 years of his life to Canada’s justice system, during which he was appointed as a justice to the Court of Queen’s Bench of Manitoba. He was the first Indigenous judge appointed in that province and Canada’s second. He most recently served as a member of the Senate of Canada from 2016 until 2020, when he retired from the role.

He may be best known as the Chief Commissioner of Canada’s Indian Residential Schools Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC), which resulted in a widely influential 2015 report that is still contributing to the advancement of reconciliation nationwide.

In addition to the installation’s traditional elements, guests — including over 100 attendees viewing online — enjoyed music by the Four Directions Indigenous Student Centre drum group, which performed three songs throughout the event.

There was also a wampum ceremony, in which Kanonhsyonne (Janice Hill), Associate Vice-Principal (Indigenous Initiatives), and Te ho wis kwûnt (Allen Doxtator), Elder in Residence, committed the university to working with the Chancellor to further reconciliation, decolonization, and Indigenization at Queen’s.

On behalf of her office, and of Queen’s Indigenous campus community members, AVP Hill presented the new Chancellor with a handcrafted fedora, adorned with colourful beadwork representing a connection to the land and the autumn season.

New honourary degrees were also awarded to Daniel Christmas and Tshaukuesh Elizabeth Penashue — both distinguished Indigenous activists and leaders who joined the ceremony via livestream from Ottawa and Newfoundland respectively. Kandice Baptiste, Director of Four Directions, presented vibrant woolen blankets to the two recipients on behalf of the student centre, the university’s Indigenous Council, and the Division of Student Affairs in recognition of their honourary doctorates.

Watch a recording of the ceremony on the University Secretariat’s website.

Update on masking and public health measures at Queen’s

Rising rates of respiratory illnesses prompt new guidance

The following message was shared with the Queen's community on Wednesday, Nov. 16 by the Office of the Provost:

Queen’s Faculty, Staff, and Students,

In light of the increasing circulation of respiratory viruses and hospitalizations across the province, Ontario's chief medical officer of health is strongly recommending that Ontarians wear masks in all indoor public settings, including in schools.

Queen’s students, staff, and faculty are asked to adhere to the following guidelines to help ease the strain on our local hospitals and reduce transmission of respiratory viruses, such as COVID-19, influenza, and RSV:

  • The university strongly recommends that Queen’s students, staff, and faculty wear a mask in indoor settings where physical distancing cannot be maintained, including instructional spaces. Individuals may be asked to wear a mask if close contact is required; please be respectful of these requests. Some activities and roles may also have mandatory requirements for masking, such as those in health clinics, hospitals, some laboratories, and in some organizations where students complete their placements.
  • Students, staff, and faculty must stay home if they are ill. Once symptoms begin to improve for 24 hours (or 48 hours if gastrointestinal symptoms) and no fever is present, you may return to campus. Please continue to wear a mask for 10 days following the onset of symptoms.

If a student needs to miss a class, exam, or other academic requirement due to COVID-19 illness, symptoms, or self-isolation requirement, academic consideration will be granted. Medical documentation of illness is not required. Students can submit an academic consideration request by following your Faculty's/School's established protocol for students with extenuating circumstances. Students can find additional information in the Extenuating Circumstances procedure and policy.

  • Everyone is encouraged to stay up to date on their COVID-19 boosters and flu vaccines. For all individuals 12 years of age or older, it is recommended to receive one flu vaccine and one bivalent COVID-19 booster this fall if you have not received a COVID-19 vaccine within the last 6 months. Individuals, including international students, who need a COVID-19 vaccine can find walk-in clinics or book an appointment in Kingston and in Ontario

A flu vaccine clinic for staff and faculty, part of a nursing student health promotion project, will be held on Nov. 22-23, 9:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m., in Mitchell Hall, Second floor, Parkul Lounge (south end of building). This clinic is walk-in only; please bring your health card or another form of photo ID.

Flu vaccine clinics for students will be held on campus on Nov. 15-18 from 9:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Students can call 613-533-2506 to book an appointment. Students can also receive a flu vaccine from Student Wellness Services throughout the fall and winter.

Student Wellness Services has also compiled a list of resources on off-campus locations where flu shots can be booked. Learn more about the flu vaccine clinics on the Student Wellness Services website.

Queen’s introduces name pronunciation tool to support equity, diversity, and inclusion

NameCoach is a name pronunciation software for use by all faculty, staff, and students at Queen’s at no cost.

With NameCoach, users can:

  • Record the pronunciation of their name in an audio file
  • Include pronunciation notes
  • Include preferred gender pronouns
  • Customize their audio link to aid accessibility
  • Provide a link via a “NameBadge” to their email signature

More information about NameCoach is available on the NameCoach website.

How can I get started?

Head over to the NameCoach sign up page to get started. For detailed instructions, please visit the IT Services NameCoach tutorial page.

Queen’s United Way campaign approaches 90 per cent of fundraising target

The Queen’s United Way campaign is nearing the 90 per cent mark with the Queen’s community donating $421,268 toward the overall goal of $475,000.

The biggest workplace campaign for the United Way of Kingston, Frontenac, Lennox and Addington the Queen’s campaign accounts for more than 10 per cent of overall target of $3,808,000.

The funds raised helped the United Way as it assisted nearly 74,000 members of the community – single parents, abused women, families, young children and teenagers, the elderly, the physically challenged, the homeless, and more – via a network of agencies and programs.

Queen’s staff, faculty, and retirees are leaders in the community having the largest workplace and retiree campaign within the region. A recent report by Deloitte showed that Queen’s community members annually raise well over $1 million to support local causes while students put in thousands of volunteer hours with local agencies and programs

To join the campaign and donate, visit the Queen’s United Way site and follow the instructions. Previous donors who have accepted automatic renewal can also use this link to increase their annual pledge.

Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act training updated

Queen’s Human Rights and Equity Office has revised its training for the suite on the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA).

The updated AODA courses are: Accessible Customer Service, Access Forward, and Human Rights 101. Also, a new training module, titled Ableism, has been added to the collection. The revised versions are now available in the HREO’s Training Catalogue.

Incoming faculty and staff are required to complete the updated modules. Current employees who have previously taken the older modules are not obligated to do so; however, participation by these individuals is encouraged.

The AODA was created to ensure Ontarians with disabilities are given fair access to spaces, while also designing elements of everyday experiences to meet accessibility obligations. The goal is to achieve accessibility in Customer Service, Design of Public Spaces, Employment, Information and Communication, and Transportation by 2025.

For more information on the Queen’s University commitment to AODA standards, please visit the Accessibility Hub site.

To learn more about AODA training, visit the Queen’s Human Rights and Equity Office.

Queen’s remembers Stu Crawford, alumnus, supporter, and veteran

The Queen’s community is remembering Stu Crawford (Arts’51), an alumnus, veteran, and former Gaels hockey player, who died on Nov. 7 at the age of 100.

After serving in the Second World War with the RCAF, and surviving his bomber being shot down, Crawford attended Queen’s starting in 1947.

He would play for the Gaels hockey team and would go on to have a profound effect on the Queen’s hockey program and the Kingston sports scene for decades.

Earlier this year, the change room for the Gaels men’s hockey team at the Memorial Centre was named in Crawford’s honour for his contributions over more than 75 years.

For more about Crawford’s life and contributions, read this obituary published on the Queen’s Alumni website.

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