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Welcoming new faculty

New faculty members and their families gathered to meet their peers at a special welcome barbecue.

  • Interim Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) Tom Harris speaks with recently-arrived faculty members during a special welcome event at the University Club. (University Communications)
    Interim Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) Tom Harris speaks with recently-arrived faculty members during a special welcome event at the University Club. (University Communications)
  • Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Science Barbara Crow talks about the opportunities that are available not only at Queen's, but also within the Kingston community. (University Communications)
    Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Science Barbara Crow talks about the opportunities that are available not only at Queen's, but also within the Kingston community. (University Communications)
  • Tom Harris, Interim Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic), speaks with a group of new faculty members on Friday, July 13 during a welcome barbecue at the University Club. (University Communications)
    Tom Harris, Interim Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic), speaks with a group of new faculty members on Friday, July 13 during a welcome barbecue at the University Club. (University Communications)
  • Faculty members who have recently arrived at Queen's University introduce themselves during a welcome event Friday at the University Club. (University Communications)
    Faculty members who have recently arrived at Queen's University introduce themselves during a welcome event Friday at the University Club. (University Communications)

Interim Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) Tom Harris hosted a welcome barbecue for new faculty and their families at the University Club. They had an opportunity to meet new colleagues from across the university as well as members of the university administration.   

“Queen’s is pleased to welcome our new faculty. We hope that the opportunity to meet one another in a less formal setting, will help them establish friendships and professional connections both for them and their families,” says Dr. Harris.

Principal Daniel Woolf identified faculty renewal as a high priority for reinvestment by the university in support of our academic mission. The five-year renewal plan will see 200 new faculty hired.

A focus on global health and rehabilitation

Queen’s International Centre for the Advancement of Community Based Rehabilitation (ICACBR) hosts first tri-university conference on global health and rehabilitation.

[Conference Executive Committee]
Some of the members of the conference’s Executive Committee, formed by members of Queen’s University, the University of Toronto, and McGill University. (Photo credit: Atul Jaiswal)

The first global health and rehabilitation conference run collaboratively between Queen’s University, the University of Toronto, and McGill University took place this weekend at Queen’s.

Scholars from the three participating universities and beyond came together for the Future Leaders in Global Health and Rehabilitation Conference 2018. They tackled global topics such as human rights, equity promotion, and global health research competencies.

“This is a first of its kind collaboration between the three disability- and rehabilitation-focused research centres, and may act as a stepping stone for larger engagement among students and faculty in global health research,” says Heather Aldersey, Director of the International Centre for the Advancement of Community-Based Rehabilitation (ICACBR) in the School of Rehabilitation Therapy. “Giving students and junior scholars a chance to connect with others interested in this field is a fantastic opportunity for them to share, learn and grow, and we were happy to host the first conference at Queen’s.”

The three centres that organized in the conferences included ICACBR, the International Centre for Disability and Rehabilitation at the University of Toronto, and the Global Health and Rehabilitation Initiative (GHRI) at McGill University. Community engagement funding from the Queen Elizabeth Scholars program supported the event. Many of the executive organizing committee members were Queen Elizabeth Scholars from low- and middle-income countries.

Students from disciplines such as law, engineering, social work, and geography joined health and rehabilitation students to discuss how to build capacity for global health research competencies, share the activities underway at each centre, and plan for future collaborations.

“This tri-university event provided a wonderful opportunity for the ICACBR to share how and what it has contributed to the developing and developed world in the global health and rehabilitation field,” says Atul Jaiswal, Executive Committee Member for the conference and doctoral candidate with the School of Rehabilitation Therapy. “Bringing three leading centres on this discipline together creates opportunities to collaborate and do much more than one centre can do on its own.”

The ICACBR began in 1991 with a mandate to advance the development of community-based rehabilitation (CBR) internationally. Since then, Queen’s has spearheaded CBR, disability, and global health initiatives in over 15 countries in Central and South America, Central and Eastern Europe, Africa, and the Asia-Pacific Region.

To learn more about ICACBR and their work within the School of Rehabilitation at Queen’s, visit their website.

 

Changes to executive team take effect

Four newly appointed leaders begin their terms in the Provost’s Office, Advancement, Research, and Graduates Studies.

Along with being Canada’s official birthday, July 1 is also the date that academic appointments typically begin on university campuses. This year at Queen’s, the day marked the start of several new appointments to the university’s executive leadership team.

Following announcements earlier this year, two new leaders are joining Queen’s, while two familiar and experienced leaders at the university are moving into new roles.

[Tom Harris]

Tom Harris, Interim Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic), recently completed 8.5 years as Vice-Principal (Advancement). He succeeds Benoit-Antoine Bacon, now President and Vice-Chancellor of Carleton University. Dr. Harris will oversee the progress of the university’s strategic priorities, including enhancing indigeneity, diversity and inclusion on campus, supporting the hiring of 200 new faculty over five years as part of faculty renewal, implementing our internationalization strategy, promoting research and innovation, and completing  Mitchell Hall -  the Innovation and Wellness Centre.  Dr. Harris is a professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering.

 

[Kimberly Woodhouse]

Kimberly Woodhouse, Interim Vice-Principal (Research), brings with her a decade of deanship and experience in the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science as a professor to her new role.  She is also a professional engineer, has extensive experience in the private sector as well as with the Canadian granting councils. Succeeding John Fisher, Dr. Woodhouse will provide leadership to the broader research portfolio and clarify the growing relationship between research and innovation at Queen’s and the resources required to support it.

 

[Karen Bertrand]

Karen Bertrand, Vice-Principal (Advancement), brings her successful track record as Associate Vice-President, Major Gift Advancement, from the University of Guelph. Succeeding Dr. Harris in the role, she will continue the close relationship between Queen’s and alumni, donors, and friends to ensure that the university remains a premier destination for students and faculty, both across Canada and internationally.

 

 

[Fahim Quadir]

Fahim Quadir, Vice-Provost and Dean of the School of Graduate Studies, begins his five-year term fresh from York University, where he worked as the Interim Dean and Associate Vice-President in the Faculty of Graduate Studies and as a professor of Development Studies and Social Science. Dr. Quadir will provide strategic direction, academic planning leadership, and administrative oversight to the School of Graduates Studies to achieve the highest possible standards in graduate education and research.

 

“On behalf of the Queen’s community, I’d like to welcome each new member to the executive team, and Dr. Harris to his new role. I’m looking forward to the work we will be doing together to achieve the university’s top strategic priorities and build on the significant momentum already underway,” says Principal Daniel Woolf. “Good things are happening at Queen’s. Our enrollment numbers are impressive, we have the highest undergraduate graduation rate in the country, our faculty renewal initiative is in full swing, we have renewed energy and enthusiasm around research and innovation, we are delivering financially sustainable budgets each year, and we have record-breaking donor support through the recent 10-year Initiatives Campaign.”  

For more information on the overall leadership team, visit the Queen’s administration and governance web page.

 

Concrete ideas for the future

Queen’s University civil engineering researchers design and build Canada’s first Moving Load Simulator for highway bridge testing.

  • Amir Fam, the Donald and Sarah Munro Chair in Engineering and Applied Science, explains how the Moving Load Simulator to Mayor Bryan Paterson. (University Communications)
    Amir Fam, the Donald and Sarah Munro Chair in Engineering and Applied Science, explains how the Moving Load Simulator to Mayor Bryan Paterson. (University Communications)
  • Among those attending the unveiling of the Moving Load Simulator were, from left: Kimberly Woodhouse, Vice-Principal (Research); Kevin Deluzio, Dean, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science; Laura Tauskela, student; Mark Gerretsen, MP, Kingston and the Islands; Dustin Brennan, student; Bryan Paterson, Mayor of Kingston; and Amir Fam, Donald and Sarah Munro Chair in Engineering and Applied Science. (University Communications)
    Among those attending the unveiling of the Moving Load Simulator were, from left: Kimberly Woodhouse, Vice-Principal (Research); Kevin Deluzio, Dean, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science; Laura Tauskela, student; Mark Gerretsen, MP, Kingston and the Islands; Dustin Brennan, student; Bryan Paterson, Mayor of Kingston; and Amir Fam, Donald and Sarah Munro Chair in Engineering and Applied Science. (University Communications)
  • The Moving Load Simulator, a one-of-a-kind system that simulates the forces borne by a bridge when large and small vehicles drive across, undergoes a demonstration during its unveiling at Ellis Hall. (University Communications)
    The Moving Load Simulator, a one-of-a-kind system that simulates the forces borne by a bridge when large and small vehicles drive across, undergoes a demonstration during its unveiling at Ellis Hall. (University Communications)
  • Queen’s University researcher Amir Fam and his team have designed and built the Moving Load Simulator, featuring new technology to test structural integrity of bridge materials and design. (University Communications)
    Queen’s University researcher Amir Fam and his team have designed and built the Moving Load Simulator, featuring new technology to test structural integrity of bridge materials and design. (University Communications)
  • A total of $4.2 million in funding to design and build the simulator – the first of its kind in Canada – and other support infrastructure was provided by the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI), the Ontario Research Fund and the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Sciences, with additional in-kind contributions. (University Communications)
    A total of $4.2 million in funding to design and build the simulator – the first of its kind in Canada – and other support infrastructure was provided by the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI), the Ontario Research Fund and the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Sciences, with additional in-kind contributions. (University Communications)

Queen’s University researcher Amir Fam and his team unveiled a cutting-edge Moving Load Simulator on Thursday, July 12, featuring new technology designed to test structural integrity of bridge materials and design.

The one-of-a-kind system simulates the forces borne by a bridge when large and small vehicles drive across. It collects data which are then analyzed by engineers to assess the performance of all aspects of the bridge structure, including the deck, girders, joints, and connections of many types of bridges.

“This equipment here at Queen’s is remarkably unique,” says Dr. Fam, Donald and Sarah Munro Chair in Engineering and Applied Science and Associate Dean (Research and Graduate Studies). “We wanted to take the lead in understanding bridges under full-scale moving loads by creating testing infrastructure that was innovative and new. We accomplished that with this technology.”

The $4.2 million in funding to design and build the simulator – the first of its kind in Canada – and other support infrastructure was provided by the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI), the Ontario Research Fund and the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Sciences, with additional in-kind contributions.

“The important research enabled by the Moving Load Simulator will save lives and reduce costs,” says Roseann O’Reilly Runte, President and CEO of CFI. “Aging infrastructure in bridges across North America can be a serious issue of safety and security. The ability to study simultaneously both load and motion will be key to building better bridges in the future and to knowing today which bridges should require load limits.”

Traditionally, bridge materials are tested using a pulsating technique that sees a large hammer-like instrument pounding the material repeatedly in the same spot. Dr. Fam says that, in reality, this isn’t how bridges are used in the real-world. By driving back and forth over the test material, the simulator recreates the forces bridges undergo every day and over a long period of time.

“We designed and built this new technology to give us deeper insights than we’ve ever had before,” says Dr. Fam. “The simulator gives us a more accurate estimate of material fatigue, which correlates to the service life of the bridge. This is critical knowledge we can now supply to the construction industry.”

The Ministry of Transportation (MTO), which owns and maintains the vast majority of bridges in the Province, is one of first partners that will be using the load simulator to test bridges in Ontario.  Dr. Fam says the technology will also contribute to more design efficiencies.

“In addition to our industry partners, the Moving Load Simulator will provide a unique opportunity for Queen’s students,” says Dr. Fam. “They are going to be exposed to one of the more unique research facilities in the world and will be able to use it for research projects.”

Dr. Fam worked closely with key players from the Structures Group in the Department of Civil Engineering, graduate students and also worked with industry partners, Dymech, Canadian Precast Prestressed Concrete Institute, and Forterra Engineering, to take this innovative facility from a vision to reality.

“The launch of the Moving Load Simulator is indicative of the highly advanced and applicable nature of research at Queen’s, and, importantly, of how strong collaborations, student engagement, and industry partnerships can work in synergy to address real-world challenges,” says Kimberly Woodhouse, Interim Vice-Principal (Research). 

 

Queen’s remembers Nancy Suzanne Reid Ossenberg

[Dr. Nancy Suzanne Reid Ossenberg]Nancy Suzanne Reid Ossenberg, Professor Emeritus in the Department of Anatomy, died on June 23. Dr. Ossenberg retired from Queen’s in 1998 after 25 years of service. She remained in Kingston after retirement.  

Nancy was a beloved teacher of anatomy and a well-respected physical anthropologist. She contributed a significant body of research on human ethnogenesis and the migrations of humans to the North American continent.

Nancy also had a passion for music, playing fiddle and singing with groups in Kingston. She loved the beauty and simplicity of nature, and loved the many animals she had cared for over the years.

“Our hearts go out to Nancy’s family, friends, local musicians and all of her campus colleagues and former students who mourn her loss,” says Daniel Woolf, Principal and Vice-Chancellor. “She clearly had a positive and lasting impact on her students and all of those who knew her.” 

A memorial service will be held on Saturday, July 21 at 2 pm at Morgan Chapel in the Theological Hall At Queen’s. Following the service, a hooley will take place at the Renaissance Event Venue, 285 Queen St., Kingston; all musicians are invited to participate. 

Donations in lieu of flowers may be made to the Salvation Army, or to the charity of your choice. 

Volunteer position: Queen’s staff or faculty member-at-large, CFRC Radio

CFRC Radio is looking for a Queen’s staff or faculty member to sit on its board of directors. This volunteer position involves a time commitment of three to six hours per month. Board meetings are monthly, and usually weekday evenings. Board members are also asked to be involved in one or more of the following committees: finance and fundraising, marketing and outreach, grievance, human resources, and policy. A background in radio broadcasting is not required. To apply, please send a statement of interest to board@cfrc.ca by Friday, July 27 at 5 pm.

CFRC Radio is Canada's longest running campus-community radio station, broadcasting from Queen’s University campus since 1922. CFRC's programming is volunteer-created and supported, comprising a broad spectrum of musical and spoken-word shows. CFRC's mandate is to provide innovative and alternative radio programming that enriches and challenges the academic and cultural life of the Queen's University and Kingston communities, and to provide members with the opportunity to participate and gain skills and experience in the collective operation of a radio station whose programming and practices are not constrained by demands for profit. The board has representation from Queen's staff/faculty, AMS and SGPS, radio volunteers, and the Kingston community.

Employee and Family Assistance Program provider publishes July edition of Lifelines

[July Lifeline]
Read the July edition of Lifelines.

As the Employee and Family Assistance Program (EFAP) provider for Queen’s University, Homewood Health publishes a number of regular newsletters, including Lifelines.

The monthly newsletter is intended to support key personnel with a wealth of information on the topic presented. The July edition, entitled Concussion Discussion looks at the common mental health challenges of those who experience a concussion or Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI).

For more information on the Queen’s EFAP, visit the Human Resources website.

For 24-hour EFAP services call 1-800-663-1142 (English) or 1-866-398-9505 (French).

Exploring art worlds

The "Art Worlds" pilot program is a partnership between the Smith School of Business and the Agnes Etherington Art Centre.

  • [queen's agnes etherington art centre art worlds mba students Jacquelyn Coutré]
    In the first session of Art Worlds: A User’s Guide, Jacquelyn N. Coutré delves into the masterpieces of The Bader Collection and historical European art. (Photo by Tim Forbes)
  • [queen's agnes etherington art centre art worlds mba students Jacquelyn Coutré]
    Ms. Coutré, the Bader Curator and researcher of European Art, incorporates the Artists at Work exhibition into a session of Art Worlds: A User’s Guide. (Photo by Tim Forbes)
  • [queen's agnes etherington art centre art worlds mba students Jacquelyn Coutré]
    MBA students ask Ms. Coutré questions, preparing for their own presentations later this summer. (Photo by Tim Forbes)
  • [queen's agnes etherington art centre art worlds mba students Tau Lewis]
    Stonecroft Artist-in-Residence, Tau Lewis, presents her work and process during a session of Art Worlds: A User’s Guide. (Photo by Garrett Elliott)

This summer, alongside art camps and classes, the Agnes Etherington Art Centre is offering a new custom program for Smith School of Business students.

Art Worlds: A User’s Guide is a cultural enrichment series designed to provide MBA students with foundational knowledge about art, its history and purposes, and the systems through which it thrives.

Expanding on the Agnes’ Learning through Art initiatives, sessions took place in the galleries and in the David McTavish Art Study Room, augmented by a studio field trip and conversation with 2018 Stonecroft Foundation Artist-in-Residence Tau Lewis.

“This pilot program is designed to introduce the language of art, and to explore the art museum as a forum for ideas and shared encounters,” says Jan Allen, Director of the Agnes. “Through guided discussions and close examination of works of art, these students are gaining insight into how visual art circulates, inspires, and moves people. We want to empower these future business leaders to enjoy artistic culture at large, and to embrace the value of creative process in new ways.”

The program takes advantage of the Agnes collections and expertise to enrich the intense year-long MBA program. This collaboration between the Agnes and Smith was supported by David Saunders, Dean of the Smith School of Business, who sits on the board for the art centre.

“Strong business leadership is more than PowerPoints and numbers. Great leaders need to draw on both sides of the brain – the quantitative, analytical left side and the creative and intuitive right side,” says Dean Saunders. “This program, led by the excellent curators of the Agnes Etherington Art Centre, challenges our students to literally see the world differently. I have no doubt they will be stronger leaders as a result.”

In the first session, Jacquelyn N. Coutré, Bader Curator and researcher of European Art, delved into the masterpieces of The Bader Collection to explore the enduring value of Old Master paintings and their high stakes at market. The exhibition Artists at Work: Picturing Practice in the European Tradition provided a setting for discovering the ways in which the history of art is constructed, curated and mobilized.

Sunny Kerr, Curator of Contemporary Art, built on that theme to talk about the ways artists create languages of process and form in a session culminating in an encounter with artist Tau Lewis in her Ontario Hall studio.

Other sessions included Alicia Boutilier, Chief Curator and Curator of Canadian Historical Art, discussing why people collect art and how taste is nurtured, mapping out the paths that artworks take from private homes to public collections, including the role of collectors in evolving museum mandates. Ms. Allen also mapped out big-picture forces and frameworks that shape the creation, presentation, and meaning of art today. 

In the final session, to be held July 12, the tables will be turned when program participants make presentations on artworks within a chosen scenario for their instructors and special guests.  

“Our MBA instructors often encourage us to seek out diverse experiences and flex the mental muscles that enable us to approach problems with a new perspective,” says Danilo Prieto (MBA'19). “As an engineer, I felt it was important to round out my skill set with this experience – to challenge myself to truly appreciate art and creativity and how it adds value to a society.”

The 16 students who completed this initial offering each received a certificate from the Smith School of Business to complement their studies.

Faculty are encouraged to explore bringing the power of art to their programs and courses: information is available on the Agnes' website.

Innovation and Wellness Centre gets a new name

New building signs will be going up at the corner of Union and Division streets next month.

[Innovation and Wellness Centre Queen's Mitchell Hall]
Signs will soon go up around the construction site to indicate the building's new name - Mitchell Hall. (University Communications)

A lead donation from a proud Queen’s engineering alumnus will support the university’s efforts to foster innovation and wellness on campus.

As a result of this generous donation, the Innovation and Wellness Centre – currently under construction – has been officially named Mitchell Hall.

“This gift, together with significant contributions from fellow alumni, the federal and provincial governments, and other friends of Queen’s will enable Mitchell Hall to be a powerful example of a shared commitment to research, innovation, and student wellness at Queen’s,” says Tom Harris, Interim Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic). 

The name of the new building has been under close wraps for the past few months, but the timing is now right to share it with the Queen's community. Mitchell Hall signs will soon be visible around the building's exterior and the new name is included in the Queen’s University Viewbook which is soon to be distributed to prospective students and across campus.

An event celebrating the building and the gift is currently being planned for the spring of 2019, where more details will be shared about this generous donation.

Located at the corner of Union and Division streets on the former site of the Physical Education Centre, Mitchell Hall was made possible through over $50 million in philanthropic support. An additional $22 million was contributed by the federal and Ontario governments.

The university is scheduled to open phases of the Côté Sharp Student Wellness Centre, the Beaty Water Research Centre, and much of the upper floors, in early 2019. In addition to wellness resources, the building will feature engineering research labs and classrooms, athletics resources, and an Innovation Hub.

To learn more about Mitchell Hall, visit queensu.ca/connect/innovationandwellness.

Professor emeritus receives honorary degree from University of Saskatchewan

A noted statistician, Agnes M. Herzberg researches the statistical design of experiments including contributions to the design of clinical trials in medicine.

Agnes M. Herzberg, Professor Emeritus in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics at Queen’s, received an honorary degree from the University of Saskatchewan on June 6.

[Agnes M. Herzberg]
Professor Emeritus Agnes M. Herzberg received an honorary degree from the University of Saskatchewan. (Photo by V. Tony Hauser)

Dr. Herzberg received her Bachelor of Arts (Honours) at Queen’s and then earned her master’s and PhD degrees from the University of Saskatchewan. She was one of eight honorary degree recipients during convocation week.

While she was unable to make the trip, Dr. Herzberg recorded her speech which was played at the ceremony. She spoke to the new graduates about the importance of education, independent thought, intellectual curiosity, and thinking in the long term.

Dr. Herzberg began her academic career with a National Research Council of Canada Post-Doctorate Overseas Fellowship at Birkbeck College and Imperial College of Science and Technology, colleges of the University of London (1966-1968). She then became a lecturer at Imperial College (1968-1988). During these years, she accepted brief engagements at the University of California, Berkeley (1975); University of Washington, Seattle (1977) and the Mathematics Research Center at the University of Wisconsin, Madison (1981). She came back to Queen’s in 1988 and was appointed a professor emeritus in 2004.

Dr. Herzberg’s research interests include the statistical design of experiments and contributions to the design of clinical trials in medicine. Recently, she collaborated with fellow Queen’s faculty member Ram Murty on a paper examining the properties of the Sudoku puzzle, including its potential for data compression.

Believing that individuals are enriched by exchanges with those in other disciplines, Dr. Herzberg introduced the idea of inviting scientists and others to statistical conferences. As a result she organized the Conference on Statistics, Science and Public Policy, held annually at Herstmonceux Castle in England since 1996. At the conference, which honours the work of her father, Gerhard Herzberg, winner of the 1971 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, a diverse mix of scientists, politicians, civil servants and journalists from many countries address significant policy issues. The conferences are summarized in proceedings that Dr. Herzberg edits herself.

Dr. Herzberg was the founding editor of Short Book Reviews, a publication of the International Statistical Institute and during her 26 years of editorship, the journal handled over 12,500 volumes. Her participation in the Statistical Society of Canada (SSC) included serving as the organization’s’ president (1991-92) and as a member of many committees. In 2008 she was elected to the Royal Society of Canada “for her pioneering contributions to statistics”.

Dr. Herzberg is a generous supporter of not only academic but also cultural projects, and her worldwide circle of colleagues and friends represents her far-reaching interests. She is an inspired and inspiring model of loyalty and commitment to the individuals and institutions that have been part of her life.

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