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Hybrid meetings the focus of upcoming workshop

Over the past two years, with the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, virtual meetings have become a regular occurrence.

With Queen’s employees returning to the office and others continuing to work from home, the hybrid model has entered the workplace.

To help leaders navigate and achieve success in the hybrid workplace the Foundational Leadership Alumni Group (FLAG)  will host an in-person networking event focused on communication and collaboration in a hybrid workplace on Tuesday, Aug. 16 from 10:30 am-Noon in Mac-Corry, B176 Seminar room.

“FLAG works to create continual learning opportunities for leaders at Queen’s. This workshop is a great opportunity to connect and learn from each other,” says Donna Janiec, Vice-Principal (Finance and Administration). “Our employees are our most important resource, and my office is thrilled to support the exceptional leadership of the FLAG Steering Committee in their commitment to leadership development and fostering a community of leaders.”

Following an initial introduction, the event will feature four table group discussions on the following topics:

  • Tech tips for engagement in a hybrid meeting
  • Preplanning hybrid meetings and communications
  • Determining whether a gathering should be in-person, hybrid or virtual
  • Building connection and team engagement for leaders in a hybrid workplace

The event is open to all leaders at Queen’s and will be facilitated by the FLAG Steering Committee.

FLAG advances the strategic priorities of the university by developing emotional intelligence and building a sound understanding of equity, diversity, inclusion, and indigeneity among the University’s leaders. The Group facilitates learning opportunities that deepen connection and understanding of people and how they work. Anyone who is interested in growing as a leader is welcome at FLAG.

To know more about future events, visit the FLAG website or send a request to join the Teams group to flag@queensu.ca.

Interim Vice-Provost (Teaching and Learning) and Special Advisor to the Provost appointed

John Pierce and Warren Mabee have been appointed to positions within the Office of the Provost and Vice Principal (Academic). Dr. Pierce will serve as interim Vice-Provost (Teaching and Learning) as of Sept. 1,2022, and Dr. Mabee take on the role of Special Advisor to the Provost, announced Teri Shearer, Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic).

Dr. John PierceIn this role, Dr. Pierce will oversee the Centre for Teaching and Learning, the Queen’s University Quality Assurance Processes (QUQAP), and the university’s academic integrity policies and practices. As a member of the Provost’s Office senior team, Dr. Pierce will lead senior committees and projects that advance the priorities of the portfolio.

Dr. Pierce previously served as Queen’s Vice-Provost (Teaching and Learning) from 2019-2021, as well as Associate Dean (Studies) in the Faculty of Arts and Science (2001-2010 and 2012-13). He also held the position of Acting Associate Vice-Principal and Dean of Student Affairs (2010-11). An award-winning professor in the Department of English Language and Literature, Dr. Pierce’s teaching and research interests include English Romantic poetry and late 18th and early 19th century fiction.

Dr. Shearer wishes to extend her sincere gratitude to Klodiana Kolomitro for her service as Associate Vice-Principal (Teaching and Learning) over the past year. Throughout her time in the role, Dr. Kolomitro implemented several significant initiatives to enhance the student learning experience, such as the Education Leaders-In-Residence Program, improving the administration of academic accessibility through Ventus, and the implementation of the Principal’s Impact Courses program to help transform curricula at Queen’s.

Dr. Warren MabeeDr. Mabee will serve as Special Advisor to the Provost to lead several projects and committees, including the review of the Queen’s National Scholar Program. This position will assist the Office of the Provost as the search for the next Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) is underway. Dr. Mabee will continue to serve as the Associate Dean and Director (School of Policy Studies).

Dr. Mabee holds a PhD from the University of Toronto and previously served as Head of the Department of Geography and Planning. His research focuses on the intersection of policy and technology in the area of renewable energy, and he has a particular interest in developing Canada's circular bioeconomy.

 

Jennifer Medves named interim vice provost and executive director of Bader College

Former Vice-Dean (Health Sciences) and Director of the School of Nursing will help lead Queen’s campus in UK.

Dr. Jennifer MedvesQueen’s University has appointed Jennifer Medves as interim vice provost and executive director of Bader College, the university’s campus at Herstmonceux Castle in the United Kingdom.

Dr. Medves will remain in the position until a permanent appointment in made. Dr. Medves is a Professor Emerita from Queen’s and served as Vice-Dean (Health Sciences) and Director of the School of Nursing for 10 years before joining the Bader College last year as Director of Student Services.

The appointment follows the recent renaming of the Bader International Study Centre (BISC) to Bader College, the result of an extensive consultation process and review of the international post-secondary landscape.

“It’s a real pleasure to be asked to lead this outstanding academic institution and renowned heritage site,” Dr. Medves says. “The new name gives us an opportunity to restate our academic mission, vision, and goals as well and broaden and strengthen our connections to the local community. I look forward to furthering the excellent work that has been happening on this historic site for nearly 30 years and to welcoming the public to the 600-acre estate.”

The name Bader College showcases the campus’s connections to Queen’s University and highlights the unique on-campus and academic experience it provides to students from across the globe. The new name also honours donors Alfred and Isabel Bader who gifted the campus to Queen’s and provides an opportunity to restate their vision for the campus as a venue for educating students from around the world, as well as showcasing research strengths, and nurturing connections to both UK and local communities.

“For more than 25 years, our students attending Queen’s at Herstmonceux Castle have been provided with an immersive and unparalleled academic experience offering access to the UK and Europe right outside their door,” says Principal and Vice-Chancellor Patrick Deane. “This new name will signal to the international community the importance of the Castle to our university and its pivotal role in Queen’s new global engagement strategy.”

Bader College also embodies the broader Queen’s commitment to advancing social impact and sustainability. Queen’s University recently ranked seventh globally in the Times Higher Education Impact Rankings for its work in advancing the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals. Recent efforts at Bader College have focused on rewilding and naturalizing the Castle estate to help cultivate and preserve the natural environment and diverse species, while providing a living lab for students, staff, and members of the public.

The college provides a unique opportunity to students from both Queen’s and other international universities, featuring small class sizes, strong student supports, a vibrant community, as well as the opportunity to study and travel in the UK. Students who study at Bader College are on campus for up to one year as part of their full degree programs. First-year courses in arts, science, health sciences, and education are offered at Bader College, as well as some specialized programs for upper-year undergraduate and professional students.

Several units have relocated to 355 King Street West

Renovations at 355 King Street West, formerly St. Mary's of the Lake, are partially complete and several units have moved-in to the facility, with more scheduled over the remainder of the summer.

The departments that have moved-in the building and started normal operations include:

  • Facilities including Trades, Parking & Fixit
  • Strategic Procurement Services
  • Finance  

Other departments set to move into the facility over the summer include:

  • Campus Security and Emergency Services
  • Environmental Health and Safety
  • Investment
  • Audit and Risk
  • Postal services

The project is taking place in two stages:

  • Stage 1, includes the south and southwest portion of the project, and is now complete. Stage one of the project represents roughly 65 per cent of the total area under construction

The City of Kingston has granted partial occupancy allowing some administrative departments to move in to the completed areas, and the main parking lot is now in normal operation.

With Stage one complete, some of the construction fencing has now been removed, and all remaining construction fencing will be removed following the completion of Stage two.

  • Stage 2 comprises the remaining 35 per cent of the area, and is located on the east side of the building. This area is still under construction and is expected to be completed by fall of 2022.

Following the completion Stage 2, the Office of the Vice-Principal (Research) will also move into the new space.

The landscaping work is expected to complete by end of August 2022, and construction of the wheelchair ramp is expected to start in September, with completion expected late October 2022.

Queries on this project should be directed to construction@queensu.ca and they will be forwarded to the appropriate office for a response. This update and others are also available on our 355 King Street West Project website.

Supporting employee wellness through gardening

The Employee Community Garden brings staff and faculty together to release stress and connect with nature. 

  • The Employee Community Garden, a pilot project by Employee Wellness in Human Resources, is located behind Jeffery Hall. (University Communications)
    The Employee Community Garden, a pilot project by Employee Wellness in Human Resources, is located behind Jeffery Hall. (University Communications)
  • A variety of tomato plants are currently growing in the Employee Community Garden. (University Communications)
    A variety of tomato plants are currently growing in the Employee Community Garden. (University Communications)
  • As part of the project's plan, extra produce will be donated to local community organizations to help address food insecurity outside of Queen’s. (University Communications)
    As part of the project's plan, extra produce will be donated to local community organizations to help address food insecurity outside of Queen’s. (University Communications)
  • Employee Wellness Services in partnership with Facilities and Sustainable Queen’s launched an Employee Community Garden as a pilot project. (University Communications)
    Employee Wellness Services in partnership with Facilities and Sustainable Queen’s launched an Employee Community Garden as a pilot project. (University Communications)
  • The pilot initiative was created to promote sustainable gardening practices, provide employees with a way to connect with nature and relieve stress. (University Communications)
    The pilot initiative was created to promote sustainable gardening practices, provide employees with a way to connect with nature and relieve stress. (University Communications)

There is something deeply rewarding about digging your hands into soil, planting a seed, and watching it grow. Gardening has also been shown to actively lower stress levels and improve wellness.

With these benefits in mind, Employee Wellness Services in partnership with Facilities and Sustainable Queen’s launched an Employee Community Garden as a pilot project. The garden consists of two plots located behind Jeffery Hall, where 30 employees routinely gather to water, remove weeds, and maintain vegetables and flowers that were planted in early June.  

Among the plants in the garden are tomatoes, beans, kale, and squash, while there are plans for a third plot in hopes of growing pumpkins in time for Thrive week in October. As a community garden, all employees are encouraged to take what they need, even if they are not involved in the planting process.  

The pilot initiative was created to promote sustainable gardening practices, provide employees with a way to connect with nature and relieve stress. Extra produce will be donated to local community organizations to help address food insecurity outside of Queen’s in the future.

“What started as an initiative focused on employee wellness quickly grew into much more,” says Linda Henderson, Coordinator, Wellness and Engagement, Human Resources. “Following the pandemic, staff and faculty were eager to get involved in a communal activity which could have a positive impact on the wellbeing of those on campus, as well as increasing social connectedness.”

Sharing knowledge and skills

To fund the initiative, Employee Wellness Services obtained a small grant for gardening tools, signage, and supplies. The organizers consulted with the Office of Indigenous Initiatives, and the Sustainability Office to ensure that the project was inclusive and fostered a sense of belonging in the community.

Employee Wellness Services connected with a local association, the Rideau 1000 Islands Master Gardeners to learn best-practices for community gardening and share knowledge on the fundamentals of planting. The expert group recently hosted a workshop on campus to give employees hands-on experience, with another session scheduled for Aug. 3. 

“In addition to getting involved in a stress releasing activity, the skills being taught can be used outside of life on campus,” says Greg Simmons, Coordinator, Wellness and Engagement, Human Resources. “Before getting involved, I didn’t even know tomato plants could get that size, or the benefits sustainable growing practices could have for the community and the environment”  

Sustainability and social impact

The Employee Garden also helps advance social impact at the university by addressing two of the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals, SDG 2: Zero Hunger and SDG 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities, in connecting with local gardeners and supplying free, accessible, nutritious food to those who need it.

Employee Wellness Services plans on continuing to promote sustainable agriculture by collecting seeds from this year’s garden for future use.

Employees and faculty looking to get involved can register on the HR Intranet for free.

Distinguished Service Award recipients announced

Leslie Dal Cin, Leslie Flynn, Dan Langham, Jim Leech, Donald M. Raymond, and Kimberly Woodhouse are being recognized for making Queen’s a better place through their extraordinary contributions.

2022 Distinguish Service Award recipients
The recipients of the 2022 Distinguished Service Awards are, clockwise from top left: Leslie Dal Cin; Leslie Flynn; Dan Langham; Jim Leech; Donald M. Raymond; and Kimberly Woodhouse.

The 2022 recipients of the Distinguished Service Award are a group of community members and leaders who have each made a lasting, positive impact upon Queen’s University.

Recipients are selected by the University Council Executive Committee. The Distinguished Service Award recognizes exemplary service to the university over an extended period of time. 

“I have always believed that together, we can become and go further than any of us could go, alone. As a national school of choice, we continue to set our expectations high, and we are invigorated by a challenge,” says Executive Committee Vice-Chair Marcus Wong (ArtSci’03). “Without doubt, these six dedicated individuals have gone above and beyond in their service to the Queen’s community and in pursuit of excellence. On behalf of University Council, congratulations and thank you for everything you have done, continue to do, and will do for Queen’s.” 

The 2022 recipients of the Distinguished Service Awards are:

Leslie Dal Cin

Retired, and first female, Executive Director (Athletics and Recreation), respected leader in the national post-secondary sport sector, spearheaded the redevelopment of all athletic facilities across campus, instrumental to the expansion of varsity and recreational programming, who has had a transformative impact on the health, well-being, and success of thousands of student athletes.

Leslie Flynn

Vice Dean (Education, Faculty of Health Sciences), Queen’s alumna, professor, exceptional educator, researcher, mentor, and leader of the pursuit, improvement, and championing of education at all levels, dedicated to the fundamental transformation of medical education, whose accomplishments and legacy will impact students, faculty, and staff for years to come.

Dan Langham

Director of Environmental Health and Safety since 1999, trusted advisor, developer of policies, programs, and services to promote a healthy workplace, champion of health and safety on campus, instrumental in the university’s response to the global pandemic, and provider of steadfast guidance and leadership in navigating the complexities of safety during an unprecedented time.

Jim Leech

Chancellor Emeritus, Queen’s alumnus, former trustee and chair of University Council, enthusiastic presider over convocation, and generous philanthropist, who has profoundly impacted the lives of countless students and enriched the university community with his dedicated and tireless service.

Donald M. Raymond

Board Chair Emeritus, Queen’s alumnus, volunteer extraordinaire, committed to principles of collegial governance who fostered strong relationships with student leaders, resulting in fundamental changes to responsible investment strategies, decarbonization, and climate action at the university.

Kimberly Woodhouse

Former, and first female, Dean of the Faculty of Engineering and Interim Vice-Principal (Research), professor, innovator, leader of transformational change in engineering education, advocate for cultivating the link between teaching, research, and industry, and instrumental in the vision and realization of world-class research facilities at Queen’s.

Inaugurated by the University Council Executive Committee in 1974, the Distinguished Service Award recognizes individuals who have made the university a better place through their exemplary service and extraordinary contributions. University Council was established by statute in 1874 and is one of the three governing bodies of the Queen’s University. All elective members are elected by and from Queen’s alumni. The University Council serves as both an advisory and an ambassadorial body to the university as a whole and is responsible for the election of the chancellor.

Questions about the Distinguished Service Awards can be directed to the University Secretariat at ucouncil@queensu.ca

New program equips leaders to tackle global challenges

Queen’s launches first-in-Canada Advanced Leadership for Social Impact Fellowship.

[Drone photo of campus]

Queen’s has launched a new program to enable executives and professionals from a variety of sectors to better understand and address complex social and global challenges. The Advanced Leadership for Social Impact (ALSI) Fellowship is a first-in-Canada program that provides the tools, knowledge, and networks participants need to tackle the root causes of social problems – from housing affordability to climate change.

“To confront the significant social issues of our day, we need people with a deep understanding and appreciation of the complexities of how to make real impact,” says Jim Leech, former president and CEO of the Ontario Teachers’ Pension Plan, former Chair of the Mastercard Foundation, and Chancellor Emeritus of Queen’s University. “Through the Advanced Leadership for Social Impact Fellowship we have the opportunity to foster a community of leaders, from all walks of life, able to drive meaningful solutions for people and the planet.”

Closing a gap

Social issues are complex and must be viewed from multiple perspectives to achieve meaningful outcomes. Leaders must also be equipped with various approaches to initiate or measure progress on impact-driven solutions. The fellowship responds to a gap in the higher education landscape.

The one-year, hybrid program draws from field-leading Queen’s research and industry experts, including environmental biologists, chemical engineers, and international business lawyers. It also applies a human-centric approach to investigate all dimensions of social issues, meaning that stakeholders are involved at all levels of decision-making and can move quickly from theory to practice and project application.

“The Advanced Leadership for Social Impact Fellowship doesn’t look at social problems in isolation or from one perspective,” says Jean-Baptiste Litrico, Director of the Centre for Social Impact at Queen’s and the program’s co-director. “The program is grounded in the belief that real issues are systemic and require a multidimensional leadership approach to inspire tangible solutions.”

[Photo of people walking on Queen's campus]
ALSI Fellowship participants will engage in four on-campus residency sessions as part of the one-year hybrid program.

Commitment to social impact

The fellowship builds on Queen’s reputation as a leader in advancing sustainability and social impact. For two years in a row, the university has ranked top-10 globally in the Times Higher Education Impact Rankings, which measure the institution’s contributions to the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals.  

In addition to being a Canadian-first, the ALSI program marks a milestone as the first cross-faculty delivered professional program. While co-led by faculty from the Smith School of Business and the Faculty of Education, it draws in individuals from the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, the Faculty of Law, and the Faculty of Arts and Science, reflecting the cross-campus commitment to driving social change.

“At Queen’s, we empower our community to advance social impact through research, teaching, and outreach activities,” says Ted Christou, Associate Dean in the Faculty of Education and co-director of the program. “We can broaden this reach to likeminded leaders through a transformative curriculum focused on a diversity of perspectives and team-based solutions.”

Transformative leadership

In October 2022, the ALSI Fellowship will welcome its first cohort with an initial intake representing a variety of careers and backgrounds. Designed to accommodate those working full-time or with other commitments, the program will combine on-campus residential sessions with online synchronous learning, and a team-based culminating project.

The one-year program includes over 130 hours of curriculum that are divided into three themed semesters: discovery, design, and delivery. Each focuses on a core mindset required to understand drivers of problems and move from theory to practice.

Participants will also network with faculty, mentors, and peers, learning from leading experts in the field with both academic and applied experience.

The Advanced Leadership for Social Impact Fellowship is currently recruiting participants for 2022-2023. For more information on the program, visit the website.

Queen’s community remembers Nicole Dalglish

The Queen’s community is remembering Nicole Dalglish, an administrative assistant in the Office of the Vice-Principal (Finance and Administration) who died March 25 at the age of 50.

Dalglish first arrived at Queen’s as an administrative assistant to the Associate Vice-Principal (Finance) in March 2017 before joining the VPFA a year later.

She was a valued member of the team, described as incredibly kind, caring, and generous, and actively supported a number of local charities, including St. Vincent de Paul, Martha’s Table, United Way, Humane Society and others.

The Queen’s flag was lowered in her memory on Friday, July 15.

A family obituary is available online.

Queen's University hosts PM Justin Trudeau for major regional funding announcement

Prime Minister announces significant new investment in EV battery facility in Eastern Ontario.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau at an announcement event at Queen's University's Mitchell Hall.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announces major new investment in Eastern Ontario during an event at Queen's University's Mitchell Hall. (Photo credit: Office of the Prime Minister of Canada)

Today, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced a $1.5 billion investment that will create hundreds of jobs and boost the economy in the Eastern Ontario region. The funding will support the development of a manufacturing facility in collaboration with Belgium-based Umicore — a leading circular materials and electric vehicle technology company expanding its operations in North America.

“Today’s announcement is about creating jobs, cutting pollution and building a stronger, cleaner economy for Canadians,” says Prime Minister Trudeau. “[It] is another major step forward as we make Canada a global leader in producing electric vehicles. This new facility will play an important role in Canada’s clean automotive sector well into the future.”

Creation of the new facility will employ around 1,000 people during the construction phase, and several hundred once in operation. The investment will come from the federal government’s Strategic Innovation Fund (SIF), which supports transformative projects across all sectors with the aim of driving innovation that will benefit Canadians.

The prime minister was joined at the event by federal, provincial, and other dignitaries who spoke, including Canada’s Minister of Innovation, Science, and Industry, François-Philippe Champagne; Ontario’s Minister of Economic Development, Job Creation, and Trade, Victor Fedeli; MPP for Hastings-Lennox and Addington, Ric Bresee; Umicore CEO, Mathias Miedreich; and Loyalist Township Deputy Mayor, Jim Hegadorn. Belgium’s Ambassador to Canada, Patrick Van Gheel was also among the event’s distinguished guests.

“This important investment by Umicore will turn Ontario into a North American leader in this high-value segment of the EV supply chain and further connect Northern Ontario’s mineral sector to EV manufacturing in the south,” says Minister Fedeli.

Queen’s Principal and Vice-Chancellor Patrick Deane welcomed the announcement and the opportunity it presents for Eastern Ontario and the university’s faculty and students.

“Queen's university is a committed contributor to the regional economy, and we are excited by this important local investment,” says Principal Deane. “We look forward to seeing the project progress and to making new connections while developing opportunities for research partnerships that will contribute to the health, vibrancy, sustainability, and continued innovation of not only Kingston but beyond."

Guests were welcomed to Mitchell Hall with a land acknowledgement by Kanonhsyonne (Janice Hill) Associate Vice-Principal (Indigenous Initiatives and Reconciliation) and opening remarks by Queen’s Vice-Principal (Research), Nancy Ross.

Read the official announcement on the Prime Minister of Canada’s website or from the Province of Ontario’s official release.

  • Ontario’s Minister of Economic Development, Job Creation, and Trade, Vic Fedeli speaks during the announcement event.
    Ontario’s Minister of Economic Development, Job Creation, and Trade, Vic Fedeli speaks during the announcement event.
  • Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau makes a major funding announcement at Queen's University.
    Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau makes a major funding announcement at Queen's University. (Photo: Office of the Prime Minister of Canada)
  • Prime Minister Trudeau address the audience and media in the main atrium of Queen's University's Mitchell Hall.
    Prime Minister Trudeau address the audience and media in the main atrium of Queen's University's Mitchell Hall. (Photo: Office of the Prime Minister of Canada)
  • Canada’s Minister of Innovation, Science, and Industry, François-Philippe Champagne delivers his remarks to the audience and members of the press.
    Canada’s Minister of Innovation, Science, and Industry, François-Philippe Champagne delivers his remarks to the audience and members of the press. (Photo: Office of the Prime Minister of Canada)
  • Umicore CEO Mathias Miedreich speaks about the investment and partnership, sharing that local talent and expertise drew the company to this region.
    Umicore CEO Mathias Miedreich speaks about the investment and partnership, sharing that local talent and expertise drew the company to this region. (Photo: Office of the Prime Minister of Canada)
  • From right to left: MP Mark Gerretsen, Ontario Minister Vic Fideli, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Federal Minister François-Philippe Champagne, MPP Ric Bresee, Umicore CEO Mathias Miedreich, MP Shelby Kramp-Neuman, and Belgium's Ambassador to Canada Patrick Van Gheel.
    From right to left: MP Mark Gerretsen, Ontario Minister Vic Fideli, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Federal Minister François-Philippe Champagne, MPP Ric Bresee, Umicore CEO Mathias Miedreich, MP Shelby Kramp-Neuman, and Belgium's Ambassador to Canada Patrick Van Gheel. (Photo: Office of the Prime Minister of Canada)
  • Minister Champagne greets Queen's students following the announcement.
    Minister Champagne greets Queen's students following the announcement. (Photo: Office of the Prime Minister of Canada)
  • Prime Minister Trudeau meeting event attendees, including Queen's administrators, faculty, staff, and students.
    Prime Minister Trudeau meeting event attendees, including Queen's administrators, faculty, staff, and students. (Photo: Office of the Prime Minister of Canada)
  • Prime Minister Trudeau and Minister Champagne greet Queen's students following the announcement.
    Prime Minister Trudeau and Minister Champagne greet Queen's students following the announcement. (Photo: Office of the Prime Minister of Canada)
  • Prime Minister Trudeau operates a robot during a demonstration by Ingenuity Labs, an engineering group innovating with the technology.
    Prime Minister Trudeau operates a robot during a demonstration by Ingenuity Labs, an engineering group innovating with the technology. (Photo: Office of the Prime Minister of Canada)
  • Prime Minister Trudeau meets Principal Patrick Deane, Vice-Principal (Research) Nancy Ross, and Vice-Principal (University Relations) Michael Fraser.
    Prime Minister Trudeau meets Principal Patrick Deane, Vice-Principal (Research) Nancy Ross, and Vice-Principal (University Relations) Michael Fraser. (Photo: Office of the Prime Minister of Canada)

Help advance employee wellbeing across campus

Employee Wellness Services seeking participants for upcoming focus groups, offering summer wellness programing.

Employee Wellness Services, a new unit within Human Resources, is seeking staff and faculty participants for upcoming focus group sessions. Each focus group will explore one of the following five themes to determine the best way to approach, plan, implement, and evaluate employee wellness on campus moving forward:

  1. Defining Wellness
  2. Leadership
  3. Communications
  4. Work-Life Balance
  5. Appreciation and Recognition

These sessions are the first of many initiatives the new unit is taking to better understand what wellbeing could look like for employees and how it could be achieved in the coming years. The first phase of focus group sessions will take place from July 18 to Aug. 5, with a second phase of sessions planned for September.

Employees interested in participating in one or more of the focus group sessions can email employee.wellness@queensu.ca to register. When emailing, please indicate which of the five sessions you would like to attend based on the above themes. Those who are interested but are unable to join the sessions can email for alternative ways to get involved. 

Summer Wellness Programming

Employee Wellness Services is hosting two upcoming summer wellness events open to all staff and faculty:

Monday, July 25, 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. – Self-Care Webinar (virtual): Taking charge of your total wellbeing has become increasingly more challenging over these past few years. Juggling schedules, taking care of others, and working from home have really changed the way we take care of ourselves. This self-care webinar will be an opportunity for you to learn tactics and strategies to assist with your own personal self-care in several dimensions of wellness. You will also have an opportunity to see what current activities Queen’s offers to assist in your personal self-care. Register online.

Friday, July 29, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. – Coffee Break/Fika (in-person): To commemorate International Friendship Day, take a break with the Employee Wellness Services team at the newly-opened Employee Community Garden, located in the courtyard behind Jeffery Hall. This coffee break is modeled after Fika, a Swedish tradition in which friends and colleagues take a break together with coffee and snacks. All are welcomed and encouraged to bring their own coffee and snacks.

Additional wellness programming will continue to be developed and released over the coming months. Employees are encouraged to review the Human Resources Intranet for the latest information and updates.

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