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Pride flag to fly on campus

Flag to welcome Queen's community back to campus following parade weekend.

This time last year, Historica Canada debuted a new Heritage Minute focused on LGBTQ+ history in Canada. Queen’s researcher, Steven Maynard – a social historian specializing in the history of sexuality – worked with Historica Canada for over a year to help accurately and respectively develop the piece. Read more about that project and watch the heritage minute now.

The Pride flag will fly on campus on Monday, June 17, in solidarity and celebration with the LGBTQ+ community across Queen’s, Kingston, Canada, and the globe.

“Queen’s is a community that welcomes and celebrates sexual and gender diversity, and strives for an equitable and inclusive future,” says Stephanie Simpson, Associate Vice-Principal (Human Rights, Equity, and Inclusion). “I want to wish our campus community a happy Pride ahead of this weekend’s festivities in Kingston, and encourage faculty, staff, and students to explore the variety of programs and groups here on campus working to bring us all closer together.”

The Inclusive Queen’s website brings together information on a variety of initiatives aimed at building a campus environment in which everyone feels engaged, respected, and safe – including resources working to positively advance inclusivity and equity as they relate to gender and sexuality.

Among those resources are the Positive Space Program, counselling services for LGBTQ+ students, the Education on Queer Issues Project (EQuIP), and the soon-to-re-launch Queen’s University Association for Queer Employees (QUAQE).

Barbecue celebrates faculty and staff

Daniel Woolf hosts his last staff appreciation event as Queen’s Principal.

  • Principal and Vice-Chancellor Daniel Woolf and Julie Gordon Woolf handing out dessert at the annual faculty and staff appreciation event.
    Principal and Vice-Chancellor Daniel Woolf and Julie Gordon Woolf handing out dessert at the annual faculty and staff appreciation event.
  • Staff and faculty enjoying meals at the Queen's Summer Barbecue at Grant Hall.
    Staff and faculty enjoying meals at the Queen's Summer Barbecue at Grant Hall.
  • Vice-Provost and Dean of the School of Graduate Studies helps serve meals at the Queen's Summer Barbecue.
    Vice-Provost and Dean of the School of Graduate Studies helps serve meals at the Queen's Summer Barbecue.
  • Staff and faculty enjoying meals at the Queen's Summer Barbecue at Grant Hall.
    Staff and faculty enjoying meals at the Queen's Summer Barbecue at Grant Hall.
  • Teri Shearer, Deputy Provost (Academic Operations and Inclusion), greeting staff and faculty at the Queen's Summer Barbecue.
    Teri Shearer, Deputy Provost (Academic Operations and Inclusion), greeting staff and faculty at the Queen's Summer Barbecue.
  • Kanonhsyonne (Janice Hill), Associate Vice-Principal (Indigenous Initiatives and Reconciliation) serving meals at the staff appreciation event.
    Kanonhsyonne (Janice Hill), Associate Vice-Principal (Indigenous Initiatives and Reconciliation) serving meals at the staff appreciation event.
  • Staff and faculty enjoying meals at the Queen's Summer Barbecue at Grant Hall.
    Staff and faculty enjoying meals at the Queen's Summer Barbecue at Grant Hall.
  • John Witjes, Associate Vice-Principal (Facilities), serves food to staff and faculty at the annual employee appreciation event.
    John Witjes, Associate Vice-Principal (Facilities), serves food to staff and faculty at the annual employee appreciation event.

Senior university administrators helped serve up a feast at the annual Queen’s Summer Barbecue held in recognition of staff and faculty. Hundreds of guests flocked to Grant Hall on June 14 to enjoy great food, socialize, and to celebrate the past year’s achievements.

This year’s barbecue marked Daniel Woolf’s last as Queen’s Principal and Vice-Chancellor and he used the time to connect with friend and colleagues before June 30, 2019, when he leaves the role after 10 years of service.

“It has been a distinct privilege and honour to serve as Queen’s Principal for the past ten years and it would not have been possible without you,” he wrote in a year-end message to Queen’s employees ahead of the festivities. “I wish you all a wonderful summer and hope you enjoy some time with family and friends partaking in your favourite warm weather activities.”

Barbecue guests also brought along non-perishable food items for donation to the AMS Food Bank – a reliable and confidential food service that aims to support Queen’s community members.

Remembering the early years of Queen's

New plinth features book that celebrates "unsung heroes" of Queen's.

Daniel Woolf and Christopher Markwell standing with the new plinth
Principal and Vice-Chancellor Daniel Woolf and Christopher Markwell, Chair of the Baird of Bute Society, standing with the newly-unveiled plinth.

People walking around the Queen’s campus will have a new way to feel more connected to the past of this historic institution now that Principal Daniel Woolf has unveiled the fourth installation of the Queen’s Remembers initiative. This new commemorative plinth in front of Summerhill tells the story of the first five principals of the university.

“While the principals who followed have received a great deal of recognition, the first five are relatively unsung heroes,” says Principal Woolf. “But they made formative contributions in a time of hardship and uncertainty for the university.”

Previous plinths have been dedicated to the Indigenous Peoples upon whose land Queen’s was built, the 5th Field Company, and the Nobel Prize-winning research discoveries led by Arthur B. McDonald.

As the eight-page book featured on this new plinth describes, the first five principals all had to take great pains to ensure the survival of Queen’s. When Reverend Thomas Liddell, the first principal, came to Kingston from Scotland in 1841, Queen’s was not much more than an idea in the Royal Charter that established it. Principal Liddell had to work hard to find both students and funds for the school, and it was not always clear that Queen’s would survive.

The four subsequent principals all faced their own difficulties but found ways to make important contributions to the school. Principal John Machar, for instance, presided over the university’s purchase of Summerhill, and Principal James George helped establish the Faculty of Medicine. Principal John Cook remains the only person to serve as both principal and chancellor of Queen’s. And Principal William Leitch oversaw the creation of the original Faculty of Law at the university while also leading Queen’s to take over management of the local observatory.

The plinth helps make the early years of Queen’s come alive for readers by sharing some colourful details about the early principals. In the page on Principal Leitch, for example, readers can learn that the fifth principal of Queen’s also wrote the first theoretical paper about the potential to use rockets to travel into space. Until recently, Jules Verne, the famous author of novels such as Around the World in Eighty Days, had been commonly credited as the first person to think of this kind of space travel. But Robert Godwin, a historian of space and a special guest at the unveiling, uncovered Leitch’s writing about rockets while conducting research for a biography. Mr. Godwin outlined his findings in the book William Leitch: Presbyterian Scientist and the Concept of Spaceflight, 1854-1864, which was published in 2015.  

Christopher Markwell, another advocate for honouring the contributions of Principal William Leitch, was also present at the ceremony. Mr. Markwell is the Chair of the Baird of Bute Society on the Isle of Bute in Scotland, which is the birthplace of Principal Leitch. In 2017, the society posthumously awarded the Baird of Bute Innovation Award to Principal Leitch in recognition of his innovative ideas on rocket flight. Principal Woolf accepted the award on behalf of his predecessor in a ceremony held at Queen’s. 

As Principal Woolf’s tenure as the twentieth principal of Queen’s draws to a close, he found it particularly meaningful to commemorate the first five people to hold the position. “These first five principals laid the foundation on which every subsequent principal has been able to build,” he says.

As with the three previous installations in the Queen’s Remembers initiative, this plinth offers people a meaningful way to engage with the campus and feel connected to the institution. Members of the campus community and visitors alike can use the plinths to put the campus in context and better understand the history of Queen’s.

“We have a beautiful and historic campus,” Principal Woolf says, “and I hope that these installations will help people enjoy the time they spend here, whether they come here every day or are passing through. I also hope that all of the plinths help people on campus appreciate the rich heritage of Queen’s.”

Public information session: Proposal for new student residence building

Queen’s is proposing to build a new student residence building on the north-west side of its main campus in Kingston.

A public information session is being held to give interested members of the community an opportunity to learn more about the proposal and speak with members of the project team, in advance of the site plan submission to the City of Kingston:

Tuesday, June 25, 2019
6 - 8 PM

Queen’s University
Mitchell Hall, main foyer
69 Union Street, Kingston, ON

This event is a casual drop-in format featuring information boards and an opportunity to interact directly with project team members. You will also have the opportunity to sign up to receive project updates. Attendees will also have the opportunity to tour Queen’s recently opened Mitchell Hall. 

Vice-Provost (Teaching and Learning) and Interim Associate Vice-Principal (International) accepts position at University of Ottawa

Jill Scott will continue in her role until June 30, 2019.

Jill Scott, Vice-Provost (Teaching and Learning) and Interim Associate Vice-Principal (International), will be leaving Queen’s to join the University of Ottawa, where she will serve as the Provost and Vice-President, Academic Affairs.

“Throughout her time at Queen’s, Dr. Scott has had an unwavering commitment to advancing teaching and learning to support positive learning experiences and outcomes. She leaves behind an important legacy for future Queen’s students,” says Tom Harris, Interim Provost and Vice-Principal. “Please join me in congratulating Dr. Scott as she embarks on her new role at the University of Ottawa.”

Since her appointment as Vice-Provost (Teaching and Learning) in 2013, Dr. Scott has focused on initiatives that support teaching excellence and enhanced student learning. Under her leadership, Queen’s has been recognized as a national leader in learning outcomes assessment. Dr. Scott worked with faculties and schools to expand online learning which contributed to Queen’s success in the provincial competitions for funding for online course and program development. She has spearheaded other important initiatives, including the development of the Queen’s University Learning Outcomes Framework; classroom renewal; the Teaching and Learning Action Plan; the adoption of onQ; providing leadership to Queen’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission Task Force through her role as co-chair; and, more recently leading the development of the Queen’s Survey of Student Experience of Teaching (QSSET).

In additional to her Vice-Provost (Teaching and Learning) responsibilities, Dr. Scott has led the international portfolio for the last several months as Interim Associate Vice-Principal (International) providing oversight and direction to the unit, and representing Queen’s with international partners. Dr. Scott joined Queen’s as a faculty member 2001. As the Head of the Department of German, she was part of the team that worked to create the Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures, which paved the way for creative, interdisciplinary programming including Indigenous Studies.

Dr. Scott will continue in her role until June 30, 2019. Sandra den Otter will provide leadership for the international portfolio, for one year, as the Associate Vice-Principal (Research and International) effective July 1, 2019, pending the search for a permanent Associate Vice-Principal (International) under the direction of Principal Designate Dr. Patrick Deane. John Pierce will become the Vice-Provost (Teaching and Learning) for one year, effective July 1, 2019, pending a search for a permanent replacement.

New University Council members elected

Online vote by Queen's alumni selects ten representatives for four-year terms.

Queen’s alumni have elected 10 new representatives to University Council.

The successful candidates are:

  • Judith Brown
  • Doug Bruce
  • Mervin Dewasha
  • Mary Dodd
  • Mary Drinkwater
  • Anita Jack-Davies
  • Zehra Sheerazi
  • Dan Tisch
  • Yanique Williams
  • Marcus Wong

An online vote for the 10 four-year term positions was held May 27-June 10. The term begins Sept. 1, 2019.

Established by statute in 1874, University Council serves as an advisory body to the university. Members provide advice on issues relating to the prosperity and well-being of Queen’s. The council’s responsibilities include the appointment of the chancellor and the election of six members to the Board of Trustees.

For more information visit the University Secretariat and Legal Counsel website.

Questions can be directed to the University Secretariat at 613-533-6095 or email.

Spring convocation comes to a close

Four ceremonies and an honourary degree round out 2018/2019 graduation events.

  • Honorary degree recipient Gerald Sutton (Com'48) shakes the hand of Rector Alex Da Silva during the convocation ceremony for the Smith School of Business Commerce program on June 11, 2019. (Queen's University/Garrett Elliott)
    Honorary degree recipient Gerald Sutton (Com'48) shakes the hand of Rector Alex Da Silva during the convocation ceremony for the Smith School of Business Commerce program on June 11, 2019. (Queen's University/Garrett Elliott)
  • Smith School of Business Commerce graduates being hooded during a convocation ceremony on June 11.
    Smith School of Business Commerce graduates being hooded during a convocation ceremony on June 11. (Queen's University/Garrett Elliott)
  • Graduating Commerce students attending spring convocation on June 11, 2019.
    Graduating Commerce students attending spring convocation on June 11, 2019. (Queen's University/Garrett Elliott)
  • A graduate of the Smith School of Business Commerce class smiles after being presented with a Pendleton blanket.
    A graduate of the Smith School of Business Commerce class smiles after being presented with a Pendleton blanket. (Queen's University/Garrett Elliott)
  • A Commerce graduate shakes hands with David Saunders, Dean of Smith School of Business.
    A Commerce graduate shakes hands with David Saunders, Dean of Smith School of Business. (Queen's University/Garrett Elliott)
  • Engineering and Applied Science students arriving to June 12, 2019 spring convocation.
    Engineering and Applied Science students arriving to June 12, 2019 spring convocation. (Queen's University/Garrett Elliott)
  • Engineering and Applied Science students seated with their peers during the June 12, 2019 convocation ceremony.
    Engineering and Applied Science students seated with their peers during the June 12, 2019 convocation ceremony. (Queen's University/Garrett Elliott)
  • Daniel Woolf addresses Engineering and Applied Science graduates at Spring convocation; his last ceremony as Principal and Vice-Chancellor.
    Daniel Woolf addresses Engineering and Applied Science graduates at Spring convocation; his last ceremony as Principal and Vice-Chancellor. (Queen's University/Garrett Elliott)
  • Kevin Deluzio, Dean of Engineering and Applied Science, addresses graduates at spring convocation.
    Kevin Deluzio, Dean of Engineering and Applied Science, addresses graduates at spring convocation. (Queen's University/Garrett Elliott)
  • A graduate of the Engineering and Applied Science class being presented with a Pendleton blanket.
    A graduate of the Engineering and Applied Science class being presented with a Pendleton blanket. (Queen's University/Garrett Elliott)
  • An Engineering and Applied Science student shakes hands with university Chancellor Jim Leech.
    An Engineering and Applied Science student shakes hands with university Chancellor Jim Leech. (Queen's University/Garrett Elliott)

Spring Convocation has officially come to a close following four ceremonies this week.

On Tuesday, June 11, the season's final honorary degree was conferred upon Gerald Sutton, former president of Canada's first venture capital company.

Gerald Sutton arrived in Canada from England in 1941 and settled in Chatham, Ont. Two years later he joined the RCAF at the age of 17 and would be commissioned as a pilot. Following his service he enrolled in the Commerce program Queen’s University, graduating in 1948. A year later he graduated from the Master of Commerce program. Working in the head office of the Bank of Montreal he would become Assistant Economic Adviser but left in 1958 to be Director of Research at Nesbitt, Thompson And Company Limited, now BMO Nesbitt Burns. In 1961 he organized Canada’s first venture capital company, Canadian Enterprise Development Corporation Limited (CED). He was appointed General Manager in 1964 and subsequently President of CED. Throughout his career, Sutton was also a pioneer in organizing and supporting not-for-profit organizations to improve the quality of life for developmentally handicapped people. Sutton and his wife Margaret, also a graduate of Queen’s, are enthusiastic supporters of Queen’s and have established a number of bursaries, awards and scholarships. Two rooms in Goodes Hall bear their names.

Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science undergraduates were conferred during the final spring ceremony on the afternoon of Wednesday, June 12. The occasion also marked Daniel Woolf's final convocation as Principal and Vice-Chancellor, before he leaves the post on June 30 after 10 years of service.

A total of 18 ceremonies were held for Spring Convocation, with seven honorary degrees conferred by Queen’s during the events.

More photos of this season's convocation events can be viewed at the Queen’s University page on flickr.

Marketing Queen’s a collaborative effort

The Marketing MUSE Conference brings together the university’s marketing and communications professionals for a day of development and inspiration.

  • Marketing MUSE Conference 2019
    Lindsey Fair, Director, Marketing, Communications, and Recruitment for the Faculty of Arts and Science leads one of the many workshops offered at the Marketing MUSE Conference.
  • Marketing MUSE Conference 2019
    Matt Holmes, Director, Government and Institutional Relations, discusses the work that his department does for the university.
  • Marketing MUSE Conference 2019
    Michael Fraser, Vice-Principal (University Relations), welcomes the close to 200 participants to the Marketing MUSE Conference.

A recent pan-university conference brought together close to 200 marketing and communications staff from across Queen's for a successful day of skills development, sharing of experiences, and a bit of inspiration.

Organized by University Relations and the Faculty of Arts and Science, the Marketing MUSE Conference is delivered by and for staff and faculty from across Queen’s University and offers professional development for those engaged in marketing and communications activities.

“The theme that inspired us along for this conference was the importance of collaboration and finding new ways to foster it across the university,” says Michael Fraser, Vice-Principal (University Relations). “Whether we are attracting students, recruiting new faculty, promoting research breakthroughs, or talking to governments, we are all supporting and building the Queen’s brand at all times. It’s important work.”

Sessions were divided into three tracks – beginner, intermediate, and advanced – with attendees able to select from a variety of topics throughout the day, from fostering organic social media and branding and design trends to writing a memorable speech or creating integrated communications plans and campaigns, and much more.

The day is also an important networking opportunity for Queen’s community members who may be working in similar jobs but in very different fields.

“The world of marketing and communications is continually transforming as a result of the advances in digital and social communications,” says Helen Vasilevski, Interim Associate Vice-Principal (Communications). “By bringing so many people together the conference participants were able to learn from their colleagues and contribute further to the ongoing effort in telling the Queen’s story.”

Participants represented a broad cross-section of the university, with members of all of Queen’s faculties attending, as well as the majority of departments. 

“We are happy see the Marketing MUSE Conference continue to grow,” says Lindsey Fair, Director, Marketing, Communications, and Recruitment for the Faculty of Arts and Science, and the organizer of the first four conferences. “The ongoing success of the conference shows what can be accomplished when you bring the innovative and creative people here at Queen’s together.”

Two new initiatives were also announced at the conference:

  • The development and future launch of Queen’s University Brand Central , an online resource  that will bring together information and links to such things as the Queen’s Visual Identity Guide, AODA guidelines, social media guidelines, Queen’s Style Guide, and web publish resources, to ensure that Queen’s is being represented in a consistent effective, and accurate way across all platforms.
  • The launch of a HR Certificate Program in Marketing , comprising seven  courses that can be completed over a two-year period, to enhance Queen’s employees’ knowledge of marketing fundamentals).

More information on both initiatives will be published by the Gazette when available.

Leading the way in supporting the community

Members of the Queen’s Varsity Leadership Council (VLC) helped organize a number of events that resulted in Queen's Gaels student-athletes raise more than $61,000 for charitable causes. (Supplied photo)

Queen’s Gaels student-athletes were very successful in raising championship banners this year as well as raising funds for charitable causes.

Led by the Queen’s Varsity Leadership Council (VLC), student-athletes raised over $61,000 for charitable causes and continued to build connections in the Kingston community through volunteer initiatives.   
 
In September, the VLC donated 643 pounds of food to Partners in Mission Food Bank at the Athlete Welcome Event.  
 
In October, student-athletes raised $39,226 for the Run for the Cure, with the men's rugby team leading the way, raising more than $30,000 of the final amount.
 
Heading into the holiday season student-athletes donated 35 holiday food baskets and over $600 to Martha's Table, a nonprofit organization that provides nutritious meals for those in need. 
 
During the season, the VLC hosted two Super Saturdays which supported the Autism Mentorship Program and become involved in mental health initiatives with Bell Let's Talk day.
 
The VLC hosted its first annual Varsity Sports Championship Day with all proceeds donated to the Heart and Stroke Foundation.
 
In March, 150 student-athletes from 18 different teams and clubs, matched up with 32 Special Olympics athletes for the Motionball Marathon of Sport and raised over $23,000 for Special Olympics Canada.
 
“This was an extremely successful year for the Varsity Leadership Council. Through a love for sport, the Gaels were able to bring our Kingston community closer, one initiative at a time,” says VLC co-president and men’s basketball student-athlete Harry Range. “One of my favourite highlights from the 2018-2019 school year would be our Pathways to Education Day. The kids were engaged the entire day through various games and speakers.”

Pathways to Education Day aims to support first generation students of sport and personal development.
 
To cap off the year the VLC was nominated for the Association of Fundraising Professionals, South Eastern Ontario Chapter Award for Outstanding Youth in Philanthropy for dedicating their time to volunteering efforts in the Kingston community.

Camps on campus

[Science Quest]
Science Quest is one of the many camps that are available for kids during the summer at Queen's. (University Communications)

Planning out the summer for the children in your life?

Queen’s University offers a wide variety of summer camps for kids of all ages. Not only do they provide children as young as four years old with fun, safe and educational experiences, they employ hundreds of Queen’s students, helping them build additional valuable skills and experience they can take with them after graduation. 

From arts and science, to sports, to gardening, cooking, superheroes, leadership, and eco-adventures, there is something for every interest!

Check out some of the exciting offerings below and find out how to register.

Athletics & Recreation Q-Camps
Q Camps offers a large variety of theme and sports camps for all age groups and skill levels that provide a welcoming and inclusive environment, from beginner preschool camps to Elite Gaels high-performance camps.

Our camp counsellors are sport-minded mature university students who create a positive atmosphere designed to help participants develop friendships, improve their athletic skills, and most of all have fun!

This year, Q Camps has introduced a 1-on-1 inclusion program for campers who need additional support. We meet with parents in advance to develop and implement individualized plans to support the successful inclusion of each child. In addition, Q Camps now has Comfort Zones for any campers who need a little downtime during the day. These zones include comforting items and sensory toys.

Visit gogaelsgo.com to see all of the camps on offer and to register!

Contact:
Queen’s Athletics and Recreation
613-533-2500
qcamps@gogaelsgo.com

Enrichment Studies Unit (ESU)
ESU offers four camps during the week of August 11-16 that allow students to develop their leadership skills and apply their knowledge beyond the classroom:

  • Summer Enrichment Experience @ Queen’s (SEEQ) gives students in grades 8-12 the opportunity to take an academic course on campus, connect with like-minded peers and learn more about planning for post-secondary education. This program has both commuter and residence options.
  • The Leadership Training Program is offered in three levels to students in grades 7-10. This innovative program is for students who strive to become effective leaders in academic, extracurricular, and business situations, and includes a retreat to the Elbow Lake Environmental Education Centre.

To learn more and to register, visit esu.queensu.ca

Contact:
Enrichment Studies Unit
613-533-3181
esu@queensu.ca

Queen’s French Camp
The Queen’s French Camp is offered in 4–5 day sessions in June, July and August, and is open to children ages 4-9. The program allows students to learn and experience the French language and culture in a fun, interactive, recreational setting. No French experience is required.

Visit queensu.ca/french/queens-french-camp to learn more and to register.

Contact:
Department of French Studies
613-533-2090
frenchcamp@queensu.ca

Science Quest Camps
Queen’s Engineering Society is offering 7 different Science Quest camps in July and August for students in kindergarten to grade 8. Campers will have the opportunity to participate in a variety of science-based activities and learn about topics such as robots, music production and coding. There are also programs open just for girls, including Girls Quest and Girls Quest Tech.

For more information and to register, visit sciencequest.ca.

Contact:
Engineering Society
613-533-6870
info@sciencequest.ca

Math Quest
Math Quest is a residential mathematics camp for high school girls interested in math and science. The program runs Aug. 20-23 and focuses on problem solving, and includes hands-on activities led by female mathematicians, statisticians and physicists.

To learn more and the register, visit mast.queensu.ca/~mathquest.

Contact:
Department of Mathematics and Statistics
613-533-2432
mathquest@queensu.ca 

GIRLS Camp
GIRLS (Girls for Innovation, Research, Leadership & Science) Camp is a 5-day camp from July 22-26 concentrating on hands-on activities related to astronomy and physics. The program gives students going into grades 7, 8, and 9 the opportunity to explore the cosmos and carry out real science experiments with the close guidance of leading female scientists.

For more information and registration details, please visit physics.queensu.ca/girlscamp.

Contact:
Department of Physics, Engineering Physics & Astronomy
girlscamp@queensu.ca

Queen’s Summer Engineering Academy (QSEA)
Connections Engineering Outreach offers a variety of summer programs for students in grades 5 to 11. The programs provide participants with an introduction to the Queen’s Engineering experience in the form of the Queen’s Summer Engineering Academy (QSEA), QSEA Intermediate, or QSEA Junior.

Visit queensconnections.ca/qsea to register.

Contact:
Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science
eng.connections@queensu.ca

Arthur B. McDonald Institute at Queen’s University
McDonald Institute- Queen’s University Astroparticles & Research for Kingston Students (MI-QUARKS) is a free afternoon enrichment program for keen high school students, including students graduating this June, that explores what it’s like to be a scientist and physicist. The program will be held over 12 afternoon sessions between July 9 and August 15. Students will have the chance to learn from undergraduates and scientists at the McDonald Institute, and explore a variety of content and practices through hands-on activities. The goal of this program is to supplement the focus on scientific content in the classroom with the practical tools that are at the heart of actually doing science.

Visit https://mcdonaldinstitute.ca/mi-quarks/ for more information and how to register.

Contact:
Mark Richardson, Education and Outreach Officer at the Arthur B. McDonald Canadian Astroparticle Physics Research Institute
Mark.Richardson@mcdonaldinstitute.ca
Outreach@McDonaldInstitute.ca

Eco-Adventure Camp
Eco-Adventure offers educational day programming with unique weekly themes for campers aged 9 – 14. Participants will enjoy day camp in the great outdoors at the Elbow Lake Environmental Education Centre, a campus of the Queen’s Biology Station. There will also be a Leader in Training Week on July 2-5 for older campers, ages 15 to 18.

Free Family Night programming and optional cabin rentals will be available every Thursday evening at Elbow Lake. Family Night is open to everyone.

To learn more about programming at Elbow Lake, visit ecoadventurecamp.ca.

Contact:
613-533-6000 ext. 77058
director@ecoadventure.ca

ASUS Summer Camps
The Arts and Science Undergraduate Society (ASUS) runs one-week themed camps through July and August for children ages 4-8, that incorporate the Ontario Curriculum . This year’s themes include Summer in Space, Superhero Academy and Fairy Tales and Fables.

To register and to see a full list of offerings, visit asuscamps.com.

Contact:
Arts and Science Undergraduate Society
613-533-6258
camps@asus.queensu.ca

Barefoot Players Summer Theatre Camp
Barefoot Players offers three one-week sessions of theatre camp in July and August. Campers aged 6-12 will learn more about theatre, acting, dance and music from members of the Barefoot Players theatre troupe.

Visit sdm.queensu.ca/community/barefoot-players to learn more and to register.

Contact:
Dan School of Drama and Music
613-533-2066
barefoot.players@queensu.com

Explore Summer Camp
Explore Summer Camps give campers, in senior kindergarten to grade 8, the chance to engage in innovative science experiments, learn about different cultures and people, meet new friends, play games, and spend time exploring the outdoors. Programs focus on a different topic each week, from wildlife to space, and include a weekly field trip.

Learn more and register at queensu.ca/geographyandplanning/explore-camp.

Contact:
Department of Geography and Planning
613-533-6000 ext. 77214
explore.geography@queensu.ca

Agnes Etherington Art Centre Camps
The Agnes Etherington Art Centre offers two summer camp programs:

  • The Agnes Art Academy is for teens who are ready to take their art to the next level. The one-week course, which runs from July 2-5, includes creativity exercises, individual skill-building and group creations.
  • The Agnes Art Camps are five one-week art day camps for children aged 6–12. The program provides weekly themes, guided artmaking exercises and lots of time for creative play.

Visit agnes.queensu.ca/learn/summer-camps to find out more and to register.

Contact:
Agnes Etherington Art Centre
613-533-2190
aeacpa@queensu.ca

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