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Weather watch for Friday, Dec. 15

The current forecast is for inclement weather on Friday, Dec. 15.

Queen’s University will communicate any weather cancellation through our website notification system and social media.

For information regarding the process visit the Inclement Weather page on the Environmental Health and Safety website.

Feedback sought for review of principalship

Principal Patrick Deane will complete his current term as Principal and Vice-Chancellor of Queen’s University at the end of June 2024. Principal Deane has indicated he wishes to be considered for a second term. Per Queen’s policy, a Joint Board-Senate Committee to Review the Principalship has been established to advise the Board of Trustees on the reappointment of the Principal.

Those interested in participating in the review can share their feedback on the present state and future development of the university and of the principalship by filling out a survey developed by the Joint Committee. 

The survey must be completed by Jan. 20 at noon.

Please note that the university does not permit anonymous responses in these circumstances.

Those who do not wish to complete the survey can send an email with feedback on the present state and future development of the university and of the principalship in confidence to trustees@queensu.ca.

The review process is confidential, and all submissions will be held in confidence by the Joint Committee. 

Queen’s is committed to an inclusive campus community with accessible goods, services, and facilities that respect the dignity and independence of persons with disabilities. If you would prefer to share your feedback in a format other than those currently offered, please reach out to trustees@queensu.ca for assistance.

2022: The year in research

We are celebrating the milestones and accomplishments of Queen’s research community over the past 12 months.

From January to December, our researchers, students, and staff enjoyed being back to in-person events, celebrating funding for groundbreaking projects, and connecting to our community beyond campus. As we approach the end of year, let’s take time to review some of the highlights from 2022.

Memorable moments

As Canada gradually reopened after pandemic shutdowns, we had the chance to once again hold on campus events to celebrate research and innovation. In July, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Ontario’s Minister of Economic Development, Job Creation, and Trade Vic Fedeli, and other dignitaries came to Queen’s to announce a $1.5 billion investment in an EV battery facility in Eastern Ontario that will create hundreds of jobs and partnership opportunities for the university, and boost Ontario’s economy. The podium party also took the opportunity to interact with Queen’s researchers and students.

[Group photo of Prime Minister Trudeau, Minister Champagne, and Queen's researchers]
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Minister François-Philippe Champagne meet with Kevin Deluzio, Dean of Engineering and Applied Science, and Queen's researchers at Ingenuity Labs Research Institute.

In November, Queen's hosted the Honourable François-Philippe Champagne, Minister of Innovation, Science and Industry. He met with students, senior leadership, and members of the research community. The same week, Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council’s (SSHRC) president Ted Hewitt visited the campus to meet with Queen's senior leadership and early career researchers, including scholars in Indigenous and Black Studies research.

Support for groundbreaking research

Cathleen Crudden (Chemistry) kicked-off 2022 with $24 million in support from Canada’s New Frontiers in Research Fund to advance research on molecular coatings designed to significantly extend the lifespan of vital metals.

In August, the Canada Foundation for Innovation’s Major Science Initiatives Fund also announced key support for two research facilities affiliated with Queen’s. Combined, SNOLAB – Canada’s deep clean astroparticle research laboratory – and the Canadian Cancer Trials Group (CCTG) Operations and Statistics Centre were granted $122 million, representing around 20 per cent of the total funding announced to support Canada’s major research infrastructure. Vice-Principal (Research) Nancy Ross travelled 2 km underground to host the announcement, which included Minister Champagne and Mona Nemer, Canada’s Chief Science Advisor.

[Photo of Queen's researchers and government officials travel to SNOLAB]
Dr. Nancy Ross accompanies Queen's Emeritus Professor and Nobel Laureate Arthur McDonald, Minister François-Philippe Champagne, local Members of Parliament, and SNOLAB administration on their way to the facility 2 km underground.

Other funding that will support Queen’s future research include:

[Art of Research photo Aging with Oasis by Riley Malvern]
Queen's Art of Research photo contest winner: Aging with Oasis by Riley Malvern, Staff (Health Services and Policy Research Institute), Kingston, Ontario.

Several Queen’s researchers were also recognized with prestigious awards and prizes. John McGarry (Political Studies) was the 2022 laureate for the Pearson Peace Medal, an award designated by the United Nations Association of Canada to recognize a Canadian who has made outstanding contributions to peace and prosperity around the world.

Nobel Laureate and Professor Emeritus Arthur McDonald (Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy) received the inaugural Canadian Association of Physicists Fellowship for lifetime achievement. Kerry Rowe (Civil Engineering) was awarded the inaugural NSERC Donna Strickland Prize for Societal Impact of Natural Sciences and Engineering Research, which recognizes outstanding research that has led to exceptional benefits for Canadian society, the environment, and the economy. Early-career researcher Farnaz Heidar-Zadeh (Chemistry) earned Ontario’s Polanyi Prize for her research advancing innovative computational molecular design techniques.

Other recognitions included fellowships from of the Royal Society of Canada and the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences. Faculty members were also appointed or reappointed as Canada Research Chairs, the UNESCO Chair in Arts and Learning, and as the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIFAR) Chair of Artificial Intelligence. Queen’s students and postdoctoral fellows received Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarships and Banting Postdoctoral Fellowships, two of the most prestigious national awards for future researchers. Internally, three researchers received the Queen’s Prizes for Excellence in Research, which are granted to early-career researchers who have demonstrated significant contributions to their fields.

[Clockwise: Fateme Babaha, Mackenzie Collins, Jessica Hallenbeck, Joshua Kofsky, Sandra Smeltzer, Jodi-Mae John, Michael P.A. Murphy, Chloe Halpenny.]
Queen's 2022 Vanier Scholars and Banting Fellows [clockwise] Fateme Babaha, Mackenzie Collins, Jessica Hallenbeck, Joshua Kofsky, Sandra Smeltzer, Jodi-Mae John, Michael P.A. Murphy, Chloe Halpenny.

In the news

The Gazette published dozens of research profiles and stories that highlight some of the groundbreaking research undertaken by faculty and students. Our community is addressing some of the world’s most pressing challenges, like climate change, with programs on carbon dioxide conversion technology and sustainable finance.

Queen’s experts are responding to challenges worsened by the COVID-19 pandemic, like health professionals’ mental health struggles, and working to create new technological solutions for human problems, including robots that can improve human mobility. They are also advancing the field of neuromorphic computers and figuring out new ways to manage obesity.

We continued our partnership with The Conversation Canada, an online news platform that pairs academic experts with experienced journalists to write informed content that can be shared and repurposed by media outlets worldwide. Over spring and fall, Queen’s hosted members of their editorial team for four workshops for researchers and graduate students.

This year, 69 Queen’s researchers published 76 articles and garnered over 1.7 million reads on The Conversation. Some of our most read articles covered topics like the impacts of housework imbalance in women’s sexual desire, the power of routines, the relationships between eating rhythms and mental health, and the causes for lung damage in COVID-19.

[Art of Research photo: The Tiniest Tree of Life by Dr. Elahe Alizadeh]
Queen's Art of Research photo contest winner: The Tiniest Tree of Life by Dr. Elahe Alizadeh, Staff (Queen's CardioPulmonary Unit [QCPU]), Queen's University.

Mobilizing research

At Queen’s, we believe inspiring new generations of researchers, gearing research processes towards more equitable and inclusive ones, and bringing together the academy and our community is as important as doing outstanding research. We are proud of our efforts to support Black Excellence in STEMM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and medicine/health) and women’s participation and leadership in Engineering.

In 2022, our annual photo contest, Art of Research, was reimagined to focus on the UN Sustainable Development Goals and placed a spotlight on the intrinsic connection between research and social impact.

Our researchers and students have also been working to bring their expertise to the public via outreach events, art installations, short presentations, and connecting with the global community to discuss urgent matters like the crisis in Ukraine – in April, we hosted a panel discussion about the origins and the impact of the conflict featuring experts in political studies and law.

[Art of Research photo: Polar Bear Denning by Scott Arlidge]
Queen's Art of Research photo contest winner: Polar Bear Denning by Scott Arlidge, Graduate Student (School of Environmental Studies), Coral Harbour, Nunavut.

 

Building on an exceptional year

Nancy Ross, Vice-Principal (Research), sits down with the Gazette to discuss her first sixteen months at Queen’s and share her vision for the future.

[Photo of Dr. Nancy Ross]
Dr. Nancy Ross began her term as Vice-Principal (Research) in August 2021. She is also a faculty member in the Department of Public Health Sciences.

It’s been a little over a year since Nancy Ross joined Queen’s University as Vice-Principal (Research). A former Canada Research Chair and research administrator at McGill University, and Queen’s alumna (Artsci’90, MA’92), Dr. Ross is an award-winning expert in population health. As a member of Queen’s leadership team, she oversees the Vice-Principal Research portfolio and works with internal and external stakeholders to advance the university’s research mission.

From Nobel Prize-winning discovery to enhancing the student learning experience, research is a driving force behind Queen’s impact. It is also the foundation for our future, and prominent in two strategic goals of the Queen’s Strategy. In this interview with the Gazette, Dr. Ross reflects on the past year, breakthrough research achievements, and her plans to support the research community in working to solve the world’s greatest challenges.

What have you learned about the Queen’s research community in your time here? 

I've learned that our research community is creative, resilient, and very committed. 

This year was particular in a lot of ways. We all know about COVID-19, but the other thing that happened in the research ecosystem was an exceptional confluence of funding opportunities open to Queen’s. We were successful in positioning Queen’s to receive significant investments from the Major Science Initiatives Fund and the Canada First Research Excellence Fund, opportunities that do not come along every day.

In advancing these initiatives, I learned a lot about the Queen’s research community, its talented people, and our areas of tremendous global strength. I have also learned we have some new and burgeoning areas of excellence that we can continue to support and grow.

How did the COVID-19 pandemic affect the Canadian research landscape?

The pandemic put research and its importance on centre stage for Canadians and the world. Our federal government responded with research investment, for example in the manufacturing of vaccines, which has put new resources into the system that will make us better prepared as a country for future health crises.

Luckily, some research was considered essential during the strictest shutdowns, and we are grateful to those who kept the Queen’s labs going during those times. In fact, investments in technology and research ended up helping society in very unpredictable ways. Queen’s researchers were champions in applying their research knowledge to address pandemic issues – from designing easy-to-build ventilators to supporting wastewater surveillance to serving as experts in media in order to help our communities better understand COVID-19.

[Photo of Dr. Nancy Ross delivering a speech at a podium]
In July, Dr. Ross acted as emcee for a funding announcement by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Ontario’s Minister of Economic Development, Job Creation, and Trade Vic Fedeli  for a $1.5 billion investment in an EV battery facility in Eastern Ontario that will create hundreds of jobs and partnership opportunities for the university, and boost Ontario’s economy.

What is your vision for Queen’s research and how will you support the community in realizing these goals?

Queen’s is already an important research university in Canada: we are a member of the U15 Group of Canada’s most research-intensive universities. We are also built on a history of people and teams who have had extraordinarily important research careers and international standing, including a Nobel Prize in the not-so-distant past.

To keep this momentum, we need to create the conditions for long and rewarding research careers at Queen’s. This means understanding when time is needed to focus on research and making sure that students are incentivized to come here and work in rich training environments, because the most satisfying part of a research career is preparing the next generation. I hope we can provide lots of opportunities for this to happen. 

I also think we need to capitalize on the fact that we have strength in almost every area of the academy. When I think about the challenges facing the world, such as working towards a low-carbon future or cancer treatment and care, we already can bring people together to look at these issues in a holistic way – from technology to policy. This is not the same case for all institutions. We will certainly work to create the conditions for this interdisciplinary work to play out for the benefit of our research community, our students, but also for the country.    

Considering that one of the goals of the Queen’s Strategy is focused on integrating research and student experience, could you elaborate more on the role of research in fostering these training environments?

When I think about the future of Queen’s and the students who come here to learn from and interact with leading-edge researchers, I see the teacher-scholar model as adding tremendous value for the student experience. Also, in my own research group and, in many others around the university, I know that having a diversity of viewpoints from scholars at all levels really provides the best experience for everybody. It can take also research in new and surprising directions, because these new ideas have an opportunity to come through.

I feel like when you are a researcher in the classroom, you gravitate towards integrating what you know and do every day, and this is research. We hope that with more opportunities to pursue research at the undergraduate level, students will be inspired by these interactions and perhaps continue to graduate studies.  

From Cathleen Crudden’s $24M New Frontiers in Research Fund grant to significant renewal funding for the Canadian Cancer Trials Group (CCTG) and SNOLAB, this has been a significant year for Queen’s research. What has been the most memorable moment for you?

It has been a very exciting year for developments in global consensus on scientific need and knowledge. I will say that participating in August’s Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) Major Science Initiatives announcement, 2 km underground at SNOLAB, was simultaneously a thrilling and terrifying experience. It served as a great opportunity to interact with the Minister of Innovation, Science, and Industry, François-Philippe Champagne, the President of the CFI, Dr. Roseann O'Reilly Runte, and Dr. Mona Nemer, Canada’s Chief Science Advisor.

With $122M in funding for CCTG and SNOLAB, Queen’s was at the forefront of this funding award, receiving the largest share in Canada. I think all of us can be proud of our role in these major research infrastructure projects, which are clearly very important, not only to Canada, but to the world.

Like all those involved in these projects, many Queen’s researchers are at the forefront of their fields, pushing boundaries and helping to address significant global challenges. As an institution, we can be very excited about what the future holds and I’m looking forward to seeing what the next year will bring!

[Group photo at SNOLAB]
Dr. Nancy Ross accompanies Queen's Emeritus Professor and Nobel Laureate Arthur McDonald, Minister François-Philippe Champagne, local Members of Parliament, and SNOLAB administration on a tour of the facility during the CFI Major Science Initiatives Fund announcement.

Learn more about Queen's University's 2022 Year in Research.

CFRC 101.9 FM Radio Queen’s University is seeking new board members

The Radio Queen’s University Board of Directors invites applications from members of the Queen’s and Kingston communities to fill four board positions, two commencing February 2023, two more commencing May 2023. From among these board positions, the appointment of board president and treasurer are hoped to be selected.

ABOUT US

CFRC’s mandate is to provide innovative and alternative radio programming that enriches and challenges the academic and cultural life of Queen’s University and Kingston communities, and to provide members with the opportunity to participate and gain skills and experience in the collective operation of a radio station whose programming and practices are not constrained by demands for profit.

CFRC’s mission is to empower and celebrate the diversity of Kingston and Queen’s through innovative, noncommercial, community-oriented radio programming and broadcast learning opportunities.

BOARD MEMBER ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES 

The board has both a legal and fiduciary responsibility to carry out the mission and mandate of Radio Queen’s University (RQU) and ensure that the financial activities of the organization are both legal and in accordance with the government’s requirements. 

Board member responsibilities include:

  • Monitoring implementation and progress of RQU’s Strategic Plan and organizational policies with the overall goal of leading RQU toward prosperity and sustainability
  • Chairing, or participating in Board Committees such as Human Resources; Finance; Marketing and Fundraising; Governance; and Accessibility
  • Supporting and nurturing opportunities for board recruitment and development
  • Reviewing agenda, minutes, and other supporting materials prior to committee and board meetings
  • Approving annual budgets and audit reports
  • Representing RQU to stakeholders and acting as an ambassador for our radio station and its value in and for the community

Key Skills and Assets

The preference is to appoint board members with one or more of the following qualifications:

  • Financial experience including budget development and forecasting, risk management, performance and sustainability tracking, internal controls, and reportage
  • Knowledge of Human Resources procedures and best practices
  • Strategic planning and implementation
  • Experience with governance and/or operations preferably in a non-profit context
  • Experience with fund development, brand positioning and/or public engagement and relationship building
  • Industry and regulatory experience and/or knowledge

CFRC 101.9 FM Radio Queen’s University actively encourages applications from individuals with historical or contemporary barriers to equity including, but not limited to Indigenous persons, persons with visible or invisible disabilities, and members of groups that experience systemic oppression and discrimination due to race, ancestry, gender, colour, sexual orientation, gender identity, spiritual beliefs or place of origin.

If you are interested in contributing your expertise and have a passion for community radio and community-building, please apply with a CV and cover letter detailing your relevant experience and interest in strengthening our organization by Sunday, Jan. 8 at 5 pm to

Attn: Radio Queen’s University Governance Committee
Email: governance@cfrc.ca

Teaming up for the community

Queen’s students are helping a local organization reduce food insecurity and spread cheer this holiday season.

A Gaels truck loaded with donated food items


 

Queen’s students and staff members recently filled a pickup truck to the brim with food and household staples and delivered them to Martha’s Table, a local non-profit organization that addresses food insecurity in the Kingston community. The haul of more than 1,600 items and $1,700 in monetary donations had been collected through the annual donation drive organized by the Varsity Leadership Council (VLC), the committee comprised of and representing students involved in varsity athletics. Student-athletes from across all sports participated in collecting the items and were assisted along the way by the university and the broader Queen’s community.

“One of the goals of VLC is to help build a strong relationship between students and the Kingston community, and our annual drive for Martha’s Table is an important way for us to give back,” says Miles Brackenbury, Co-President, VLC. “Working with Martha’s Table, we identified the items most in need and focused on securing significant donations of non-perishable food items and household staples like toilet paper and laundry detergent. This initiative was truly a community effort, with student-athletes, coaches, staff, and the general student body working together for a good cause.”

Queen's Athletics & Recreation (A&R) contributed to the donation drive by organizing a series of drop-in fitness classes that were free with a food bank donation. Staff members from A&R’s Facilities team also supported the initiative by helping deliver the donations to Martha’s Table.

Martha’s Table provides community members in need with nutritious meals and a gathering space where they can find social support. It has been serving Kingston since 1997.

“This donation has become part of our holiday tradition,” says Ronda Candy, Executive Director of Martha’s Table. “We are always inspired by the students’ efforts on behalf of the community. The donation is exceptionally large and really makes an impact in our food budget and meal-planning process. There are also always treats to give away, like cookies and chocolates, that our guests truly appreciate.”

Some student-athletes also took the drive as an opportunity to spread holiday cheer. While out collecting donations, the Track and Field Team and the Cross Country Team sang carols for members of the Kingston community.

More outreach planned for the new year

VLC has plans for continuing to make an impact in the community in the new year as well.

“We look forward to continuing to build community partnerships into the second term, as we will be working with Pathways to Education to set up school visits from varsity teams, alongside additional fundraisers for local causes,” says Brackenbury. “We are so grateful for all the community support we receive in our athletic endeavors, so giving back to the community is one way we express that gratitude.”

Student impact on the community

This donation makes up part of Queen’s social and economic impact on the Kingston community and surrounding area, which has been measured in a study conducted by Deloitte. That study found that Queen’s students, faculty, and staff annually raise more than $1 million to support local causes. It also found that Queen’s students work thousands of volunteer hours for local causes.

Learn more about the community and economic impact of Queen’s students and read the full study on the Queen’s Economic and Community Impact website.

Building Community Together

This story is part of an ongoing series highlighting how students across Queen’s are building community together through meaningful volunteer and fundraising efforts.

For the Record – Dec. 8, 2022

For the Record provides postings of appointment, committee, grant, award, and other notices set out by collective agreements and university policies and processes. It is the university’s primary vehicle for sharing this information with our community.

Submit For the Record information for posting to Gazette editor Andrew Carroll.

COMMITTEES

Selection Committee appointed for Head, Department of Philosophy

Christine Sypnowich’s term as Head of the Department of Philosophy is scheduled to end on June 30, 2023. 

The Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) Teri Shearer has appointed a selection committee to advise on the appointment of the next head of the department.

The selection committee membership is: 

Elected Members

  • Josh Mozersky, Professor, Department of Philosophy
  • Dalitso Ruwe, Assistant Professor, Department of Philosophy
  • Udo Schuklenk, Professor, Department of Philosophy
  • Daryn Lehoux, Professor, Department of Philosophy
  • Jon Miller, Professor, Department of Philosophy

Appointed Members

  • Jonathan Rose, Cognate Faculty, Professor, Head, Department of Political Studies
  • Jen McLaren, Graduate Assistant, Department of Philosophy
  • Kerem Onel, Undergraduate Student, Department of Philosophy
  • Sofie Vladd, Graduate Student, Department of Philosophy
  • Chris DeLuca, Associate Dean, School of Graduate Studies and Postdoctoral Affairs
  • Lynda Jessup (Chair), Vice-Dean, Faculty of Arts and Science
  • Chrystalla Frantzeskos (Recording Secretary), Assistant to the Vice Dean and Associate Deans, Faculty of Arts and Science

Pursuant to Articles 41.3 and 41.3.6 of the Collective Agreement between Queen’s University Faculty Association and Queen’s University at Kingston, comments on the present state and future prospects of the Department of Philosophy can be sent by Jan. 13, 2023. Submission of names of possible candidates for the headship are also invited.

Send all comments, in confidence, to the attention of Chrystalla Frantzeskos, chrystalla.frantzeskos@queensu.ca. All letters will be reviewed by the selection committee and will become part of the record of decision-making.

At the request of either the department members or the committee, a meeting can be arranged between the department and the committee to ascertain the department’s views on the qualities of a head. Once a short list has been established, it will be distributed to members of the department for further input on the merits of the respective candidate(s).

Selection Committee appointed for Director, School of Kinesiology and Health Studies

Samantha King’s term as Acting Director of the School of Kinesiology and Health Studies is scheduled to end on June 30, 2023.

The Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) Teri Shearer has appointed a selection committee to advise on the appointment of the next director of the department.

The selection committee membership is: 

Elected Members

  • Elijah Bisung, Assistant Professor, School of Kinesiology and Health Studies
  • Lucie Levesque, Professor, School of Kinesiology and Health Studies
  • Gerome Manson, Assistant Professor, School of Kinesiology and Health Studies
  • Bob Ross, Professor, School of Kinesiology and Health Studies
  • Courtney Szto, Assistant Professor, School of Kinesiology and Health Studies

Appointed Members

  • Sam McKegney, Cognate Faculty, Professor, Head, Department of English
  • Anna van der Meulen, Department Manager & Undergraduate Chair, School of Kinesiology and Health Studies
  • Anosha Waqar, Undergraduate Student, School of Kinesiology and Health Studies
  • Lindsay Lew, Graduate Student, School of Kinesiology and Health Studies
  • Tara MacDonald, Associate Dean, School of Graduate Studies and Postdoctoral Affairs
  • Lynda Jessup (Chair), Vice-Dean, Faculty of Arts and Science
  • Chrystalla Frantzeskos (Recording Secretary), Assistant to the Vice Dean and Associate Deans, Faculty of Arts and Science

Pursuant to Articles 41.3 and 41.3.6 of the Collective Agreement between Queen’s University Faculty Association and Queen’s University at Kingston, comments on the present state and future prospects of the School of Kinesiology and Health Studies can be sent by Jan. 13, 2023. Submission of names of possible candidates for the directorship are also invited.

Send all comments, in confidence, to the attention of Chrystalla Frantzeskos, chrystalla.frantzeskos@queensu.ca. All letters will be reviewed by the selection committee and will become part of the record of decision-making.

At the request of either the department members or the committee, a meeting can be arranged between the department and the committee to ascertain the department’s views on the qualities of a director. Once a short list has been established, it will be distributed to members of the department for further input on the merits of the respective candidate(s).

Selection Committee appointed for the Head, Department of Civil Engineering

Ian Moore’s term as Head of the Department of Civil Engineering ends June 30, 2023. In accordance with Article 41 of the Collective Agreement between Queen’s University Faculty Association and Queen’s University, a selection committee has been formed to assist Provost and Vice Principal (Academic) Teri Shearer, in the selection of a Head of the Department of Civil Engineering. The membership of the committee is as follows:

 Elected Members:

  • Ryan Mulligan, Professor
  • Andy Take, Professor
  • Josh Woods, Assistant Professor
  • Sarah Jane Payne, Assistant Professor
  • Kevin Mumford, Associate Professor
  • Michael Cunningham, Cognate Faculty
  • Graeme Boyd, Department Manager
  • David Kozma, Undergraduate student
  • Laura Meteer, Graduate Student
  • Tara MacDonald, Associate Dean, School of Graduate Studies.
  • Kevin J. Deluzio, Dean, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science
  • Christa Camirand, Director, Human Resources, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science
  • Jacqueline Hill, Staffing Officer, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science

Members of the university community are invited to comment on the present state and future prospects of the Department of Civil Engineering and to submit names of potential candidates for the headship to Kevin J. Deluzio, Dean (Chair), c/o Jacqueline Hill (jlh15@queensu.ca), Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science by Jan. 13, 2023. Self-nominations will also be accepted. All letters will be reviewed by the selection committee and will become a part of the record of decision making.

Sustainable Living Series: Individual Sustainability

This session of the Sustainable Living Series will be led by Ange Defosse, Owner/Operator of Harlowe Green. The session will provide a discussion and review of the mindset changes that are required for long term individual approaches to sustainability in the home, in personal care products, and in individual contexts within today's consumer-driven society.

The session will take place online on Dec. 8, from 2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Learn more and register on the HR Learning Catalogue.

Naming the Albert Street Residence

Consultations are underway to select a permanent name for the new Albert Street Residence.

The name will reflect the nature and purpose of the building as a residence, using a word or words in an Indigenous language. 

This approach reflects institutional commitments to commemorate Indigenous history, and advance equity, diversity, inclusion, Indigeneity, and Truth and Reconciliation on our campus and across our community. It further aligns with the values outlined in the University Strategy.

A working group, comprising students, faculty and staff, is providing advice and guiding the process to develop a proposal under the university’s Naming Policy, and associated procedure for Service and Commemorative Naming.

The working group has identified the following themes for the name, that include:  

  • Community 
  • Belonging 
  • Welcoming / Comfort 
  • Unity 
  • Home
  • Physical Space – e.g. lodge, nest 

Additional considerations for the name include its short form(s), the potential for more than one Indigenous language to be integrated, and its relevance and meaning to local Indigenous communities.

Campus community members’ ideas and input are invited via email to: edhouse@queensu.ca before December 23.  

Outreach and focus groups are being facilitated with residence students who identify as Indigenous, students at Four Directions Indigenous Student Centre, the university’s Elders Advisory Circle, the Office of Indigenous Initiatives, and the Indigenous Caucus of the University’s Indigenous Council.

Recommendations will be made to the university’s Senior Leadership Team, with final review and approval by the Board of Trustees anticipated in March 2023.

More information: https://www.queensu.ca/residences/help-name-albert-street-residence

Principal's Holiday Reception returns as in-person event

The Principal’s Holiday Reception brought Queen’s employees together on Wednesday, Dec. 7, to reconnect with colleagues from across the university, and try out some tasty treats in the main gym of the Athletics and Recreation Centre.

It marked a return to an in-person format for the event for the first time since 2019 due to the pandemic.

Attendees were able to submit a ballot for a gingerbread house draw and to donate non-perishable food items for the AMS food bank.

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