Queen's Gazette | Queen's University

Search form

Campus Community

Queen’s University Task Force on Street Parties holds first meeting

The Queen’s University Task Force on Street Parties held its first meeting on June 6.

Struck by Principal and Vice-Chancellor Patrick Deane, the task force builds on Queen’s existing partnerships with the City of Kingston and community partners and provides a forum to develop new and innovative approaches to address unsanctioned street parties.

In its first meeting, the task force agreed upon its mandate and key principles. The task force will consult with Queen's students, community members, and other interested and affected members of the Queen's and Kingston communities, and report back to the public in the fall of 2022 with recommendations and an implementation strategy.

Chaired by Principal Deane, the task force is made up of 24 representatives, 13 of whom are community partner representatives from the municipality, healthcare, emergency response, other area post-secondary institutions, community groups and law enforcement, and 11 university student and staff representatives.

More information detailing the work and membership of the committee is available on the Principal’s website. The information will continue to be updated as work progresses.

Nicholas Mosey appointed as Deputy Provost (Academic Operations and Inclusion)

Nick Mosey
Nicholas Mosey has been appointed as Deputy Provost (Academic Operations and Inclusion).

Nicholas Mosey, Associate Dean (Research) in the Faculty of Arts and Science (FAS), has been appointed as Deputy Provost (Academic Operations and Inclusion), effective July 1, 2022. Dr. Mosey will hold this position on an interim basis while Deputy Provost Teri Shearer serves as Interim Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic).

In this role, Dr. Mosey will work closely with the senior leadership team at Queen’s to advance the university’s academic, operational, and budgetary goals, including overseeing academic appointments, directing the Office of Planning and Budgeting, and chairing several senior university committees. He will also advance the university’s commitment to diversity and inclusion in partnership with several units across campus, including the Human Rights and Equity Office and the Office of Indigenous Initiatives.

“Dr. Mosey will bring his keen ability to build relationships across multiple departments to the Office of the Provost,” says Mark Green, Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic). “Dr. Mosey demonstrates a leadership style that is inclusive and thoughtful. We look forward to welcoming him to the office and are thankful for his willingness to accept this new role.”

Dr. Mosey was appointed to his current position in 2018, a year after serving as the Acting Associate Dean (Graduate Studies and Research, Science) for the Faculty of Arts and Science. As Associate Dean (Research), Dr. Mosey facilitates the intensification of research within the Faculty of Arts and Science in addition to coordinating and guiding strategic research activities. He also supports researchers in securing funding and obtaining research awards.

Dr. Mosey joined Queen’s Department of Chemistry in 2008 as an Assistant Professor, later earning a tenured position in 2014. He was promoted to full Professor in 2019. Dr. Mosey served as his department’s Graduate Coordinator, first-year Chemistry Coordinator, and Associate Chair of the Faculty’s Graduate Council, among other roles.

Dr. Mosey earned his BSc and PhD from the University of Western Ontario and completed his Post-Doctoral Fellowship at Princeton University in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering.

Implementing the Scarborough Charter at Queen’s

Scarborough Charter
Four committees have been formed at Queen's University to help advance specific targets within each of the four categories that fall under the Scarborough Charter.

In November 2021, Queen’s University became a founding signatory of the Scarborough Charter on Anti-Black Racism and Black Inclusion in Canadian Higher Education. Signing this document commits the university to specific goals and targets to work towards eliminating anti-Black racism across the institution and to promote Black representation and flourishing. More than 50 universities and colleges across Canada have now signed the Scarborough Charter.

To help direct this work at Queen’s, four committees have been formed to help advance specific targets within each of the four categories that fall under the charter. For each, two committee co-chairs from faculty and staff have been appointed. These committees work in conjunction with the Principal’s Declaration of Commitment to Address Systemic Racism Implementation Group that was formed two years ago.

“The Scarborough Charter document is ambitious but more importantly, it is more than just a signature. It commits us to change and evolution, to making progress at Queen’s to eradicate anti-Black racism and confront some of the systemic barriers that have been in our way,” says Stephanie Simpson, Associate Vice-Principal, Human Rights, Equity and Inclusion.

The Scarborough Charter committees and co-chairs are working in these specific areas of focus:

  • Black Community Representation and Inclusion – Co-chairs: Martha Munezhi and Lon Knox
  • Research – Co-chairs: Katherine McKittrick and Betsy Donald
  • Teaching, Learning, and Student Success – Co-chairs: Corinna Fitzgerald and Lavonne Hood
  • Community Engagement – Co-chairs: Yinka Adegbusi and Heather Cole

Over the summer, the committees will conduct an inventory of the current environment and initiatives already underway that speak to the specific goals laid out in the document. After that, the working groups will consult with the university community in the fall to find new ways to implement the goals and make progress on our commitments.

“We are embracing the goals set out in the Scarborough Charter to seek new paths at Queen’s to eliminate anti-Black racism, support Black flourishing and ultimately work towards a more just, equitable and civil society,” says Patrick Deane, Principal and Vice-Chancellor.

You can learn about updates on this work and next steps through the Principal’s Office website.

New AMS executive looking to amplify student voices

Serving a one-year term, the recently elected AMS executive team unveils their plans to promote positive change at the university.

AMS executive: Vice-President (University Affairs) Callum Robertson; Vice-President (Operations) Tina Hu; President Eric Sikich
Vice-President (University Affairs) Callum Robertson, Vice-President (Operations) Tina Hu, and President Eric Sikich are the executive of the Alma Mater Society (AMS) for 2022-23. (Supplied Photo) 

Serving the needs 18,000 students and overseeing the oldest student association in Canada and its 13 services is a significant responsibility. However, this year’s executive team of the Queen’s Alma Matter Society (AMS) is embracing the challenge of advocating, representing, and uniting students across campus. 

The team consists of President Eric Sikich (ArtSci ’22), Vice-President (Operations) Tina Hu (ArtSci ’22), and Vice-President (University Affairs) Callum Robertson (ArtSci ’23) and they were elected with 90.7 per cent of the vote. 

Experience in student government

As Vice-President (University Affairs), Robertson was motivated to run in the AMS election by his experience working in various positions in student government

“I've been very lucky to have served in a number of positions throughout my university degree. Each year I've seen the passionate work being done by students to make Queen's into the vibrant community it is today and realized to continue working with and helping other students, I'd need to expand my responsibilities and scope,” Robertson says. “What truly made me run for a position in the AMS was the opportunity to uplift the voices and ideas of the undergraduate student body."

As Vice-President (Operations), Hu manages a team of nine distinct services with more than 275 employees. Along with managing the day-to-day operations of the services, she oversees the society's consolidated operating budget, strategy, and marketing plans.

“The role is incredibly exciting as an opportunity to build and lead strong teams whose impact and service are felt all throughout the Queen's community,” says Hu.

Sikich was also motivated to run for AMS president due to the strong relationships and positive experience during his time working for the Arts and Science Undergraduate Society (ASUS).

“What made me want to run for the AMS is the vibrant and passionate student community at Queen's,” Sikich says “Over the past four years, Queen's University has provided me with the opportunity to develop in my personal and professional life in ways I could not have imagined. Queen's has helped me grow as a person, and find a place in my community.”

Pillars of change

Together, Sikich, Hu, and Robertson campaigned and developed a platform focused on community building, student engagement and trust, transparency and communication, and advocacy.

“We aim to achieve our goals by building positive relations with university stakeholders, while continuing to bring student issues to the forefront of all conversations, even if difficult,” Sikich says. “Unlike many other years, we have a prime opportunity to jump start student engagement and, subsequently, the student voice with the mass return to campus.”

Throughout the year, the executive team aims to continuously consult student voices around campus to hear how needs are changing, and how they can be addressed. Through marketing initiatives and weekly programming, the executive team hopes to engage new students with AMS services, governance, and extra-curriculars for a necessary revitalization of the student association.

“We have a desire to ensure all Queen's students are supported so they can succeed, and we will constantly work toward achieving that goal,” Sikich says. “We are extremely excited for the coming year and are proud to have been elected as the next AMS executive team.”   

Learn more about the executive team by visiting the AMS website.

 

 

 

 

New rector committed to strengthening ties with community

As rector, Owen Crawford-Lem represents all undergraduate and graduate students during a two-year term.

Rector Owen Crawford-Lem speaks from the podium during the convocation ceremony on Friday, May 27.
Owen Crawford-Lem, the 38th rector of Queen's University, speaks from the podium during the convocation ceremony on Friday, May 27. (Queen's University)

As the 38th rector in Queen’s history, Owen Crawford-Lem is prepared to advocate on behalf of students and continue to strengthen the relationship between the university and the Kingston community. 

Crawford-Lem grew up in Toronto and has just completed his third year of an undergraduate medial degree in political science and sociology, while also finishing a certificate in business.

Crawford-Lem competed against five other candidates this spring and will now serve as the representative of all Queen’s University undergraduate and graduate students to the institution in matters pertaining to education during a two-year term. In addition, the rector serves on governing bodies, including the board of trustees, senate, and various other committees. The rector also participates in many ceremonial functions, including convocations and the conferring of awards.

Having been involved in the Arts and Science Undergraduate Society’s (ASUS) marketing office during his first year, Crawford-Lem is familiar with the responsibilities of balancing academic and extracurricular activities, as well as the leadership required to engage and promote dialogue with students.

The Gazette recently sat down with Crawford-Lem to discuss his past experiences and future plans as the rector.

Why did you decide to run for the position of rector?  

I was looking to get more involved in Queen’s and different opportunities had come up here and there, and then I heard about the rector role. It had been vacant for a year or so, and I had read an article written by the AMS suggesting that the rector is one of the most underused assets at Queen’s. So, I started setting up meetings and talking to student leaders around campus as well as administrators and the senior leadership team, and I was excited as it sounded like the office had room to grow and opportunity to re-evaluate its mandate in serving students.

What do you hope to achieve during your time as rector?

I’ve noticed a communication disconnect between students and the administration of the university, as well as many issues that are external to the university and extend into the community.

I've been lucky enough to have had a really great experience here and I want to make sure that everyone's able to have a great experience and that starts with student advocacy. It means making sure that student concerns are heard, whether big or small, and making a campus that is as inclusive as possible and one that everyone can be welcomed home to.

Housing for instance is a reoccurring theme, which I feel would benefit from more student voices.

Additionally, sexual violence prevention and response was a significant part of my platform and continues to be a topic which is extremely important, particularly the growing need to involve more men on campus. I’d like to be someone who students can come and talk to and to connect people with the resources that they need.

What has been the most rewarding part about being rector so far?

Meeting new people. I've been afforded a unique opportunity to really learn about the school in the deepest way possible. That means meeting with student governments like the AMS and the SGPS, and senior leadership who are laying out an incredible framework for the university, and it's something that I think all of us can find a little bit of buy-in. I think it’s great meeting with and speaking to students who come by here, they pop in, they say hi. It's been really fun so far and it's a great learning experience and I hope it continues for the next two years.

Learn more about the office of the rector.

Queen’s celebrates Pride Month

A range of resources and activities are available at the university and through the City of Kingston.

Pride Progress flag flies with Stauffer Library in the background
The Pride Progress flag was raised at the corner of Union Street and University Avenue on Wednesday, June 1 in recognition of Pride Month. (University Communications)

The arrival of June marks the start of Pride Month, a time to honour and support members of the LGBTQ2S+ community, while also reflecting on the long, difficult history that has led to this month.

Throughout June, Queen’s University will highlight several resources available to our students, staff, and faculty and point to several events taking place in Kingston this month.

To kick things off, Queen’s is raising the Progress Pride flag on the flagpole adjacent to the John Deutsch Student Centre (JDUC) for the entire month.

The Progress Pride flag provides an opportunity to recognize the unique intersections of identity that exist within LGBTQ2S+ communities. This updated version of the Pride flag was designed by Daniel Quasar in 2018 to visually represent individual identities and how they intersect with one another, recognizing the interconnected struggles.

“Pride Month is a significant time for members of the LGBTQ2S+ community as it provides a sincere opportunity to learn and have meaningful dialogue on what it means to be Queer in today’s society,” says Teri Shearer, Deputy Provost (Academic Operations and Inclusion). “I’m proud of the work being done at Queen’s and happy to say there are many resources here designed to support our students, staff, and faculty throughout the year.”

Some of those programs include the Positive Space Campaign, Levana Gender Advocacy Centre, Queen’s University Association for Queer Employees, and the Provost's Action Group for Gender and Sexual Diversity. A list of resources can be found on the Inclusive Queen’s page. Learn more about the Progress Pride flag on the Yellow House website.

Continue to visit Queen’s social media platforms as we highlight organizations around campus, including the Yellow House and Queen's Queer Alumni Chapter throughout the month of June. Don’t forget to mark your calendars for the Pride Parade on Princess Street, which takes place June 18 starting at 11 a.m.

New Staff Senator at Large elected

The result of the election for the staff senator at large position is now official.

Karalyn McRae will serve a one-year term as a member of University Senate effective Sept. 1, 2022 to Aug. 31, 2023.

More information about University Senate is available on the Secretariat and Legal Counsel website.

For the Record, June 2, 2022

For the Record provides postings of appointment, committee, grant, award, and other notices set out by collective agreements and university policies and processes. It is the university’s primary vehicle for sharing this information with our community.

Submit For the Record information for posting to Gazette editor Andrew Carroll.

COMMITTEES

Headship Search Committee - Department of Medicine

Dr. Stephen Archer’s second term as Head of the Department of Medicine will end on June 30, 2023, and a search committee is to be established to make a recommendation to the board chairs of the participating hospitals and the provost of Queen’s University on its future leadership. The search committee, which is being established in accordance with the senate document governing the Appointment of Clinical/Academic Department Heads is to be comprised of:

  • The chief of staff (or delegate) of each participating hospital
  • One representative of each participating hospital selected by its board
  • One member selected by the Department of Medicine
  • One head of a clinical department, selected by the chiefs of staff of the participating hospitals and the dean
  • The dean of the Faculty of Health Sciences (or vice-dean)
  • Two members of the faculty, one of whom shall be from the Department of Medicine, appointed by the dean
  • Two learners, one of whom shall be enrolled in a graduate, or post-graduate medical program, to be selected by the respective groups

Following approval of the composition of the committee, the membership will be announced in the Queen's Gazette and the appropriate hospital circulars.

At this time, nominations to the Headship Search Committee are invited. Additionally, faculty, staff, students, residents and all other members of the hospital and university communities, are invited to submit their comments, in writing, on the present state and future prospects of the Department of Medicine, as well as the names of possible candidates for the headship and the reasons for supporting each nominee. Written submissions are to be completed, via Microsoft Forms. Any questions or concerns may be directed to the Faculty Staffing Office at fhsstaffing@queensu.ca. Responses received will remain confidential and will be shared only with the members of the review committee. Anonymous submissions will not be considered.

Headship Search Committee - Department of Pediatrics

Dr. Robert Connelly’s second term as Head of the Department of Pediatrics will end on June 30, 2023, and a search committee is to be established to make a recommendation to the board chairs of the participating hospitals and the provost of Queen’s University on its future leadership. The search committee, which is being established in accordance with the senate document governing the Appointment of Clinical/Academic Department Heads is to be comprised of:

  • The chief of staff (or delegate) of each participating hospital
  • One representative of each participating hospital selected by its board
  • One member selected by the Department of Pediatrics
  • One head of a clinical department, selected by the chiefs of staff of the participating hospitals and the dean
  • The dean of the Faculty of Health Sciences (or vice-dean)
  • Two members of the faculty, one of whom shall be from the Department of Pediatrics, appointed by the dean
  • Two learners, one of whom shall be enrolled in a graduate, or post-graduate medical program, to be selected by the respective groups.

Following approval of the composition of the committee, the membership will be announced in the Queen's Gazette and the appropriate hospital circulars.

At this time, nominations to the Headship Search Committee are invited. Additionally, faculty, staff, students, residents and all other members of the hospital and university communities, are invited to submit their comments, in writing, on the present state and future prospects of the Department of Pediatrics, as well as the names of possible candidates for the headship and the reasons for supporting each nominee. Written submissions are to be completed, via Microsoft Forms. Any questions or concerns may be directed to the Faculty Staffing Office at fhsstaffing@queensu.ca. Responses received will remain confidential and will be shared only with the members of the review committee. Anonymous submissions will not be considered.

Headship Search Committee - Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology

Dr. Graeme Smith’s second term as head of the Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology will end on June 30, 2023, and a search committee is to be established to make a recommendation to the board chairs of the participating hospitals and the provost of Queen’s University on its future leadership. The search committee, which is being established in accordance with the senate document governing the Appointment of Clinical/Academic Department Heads is to be comprised of:

  • The chief of staff (or delegate) of each participating hospital
  • One representative of each participating hospital selected by its board
  • One member selected by the Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology
  • One head of a clinical department, selected by the Chiefs of Staff of the participating hospitals and the dean
  • The dean of the Faculty of Health Sciences (or vice-dean)
  • Two members of the faculty, one of whom shall be from the Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, appointed by the dean
  • Two learners, one of whom shall be enrolled in a graduate, or post-graduate medical program, to be selected by the respective groups

Following approval of the composition of the committee, the membership will be announced in the Queen's Gazette and the appropriate hospital circulars.

At this time, nominations to the Headship Search Committee are invited. Additionally, faculty, staff, students, residents and all other members of the hospital and university communities, are invited to submit their comments, in writing, on the present state and future prospects of the Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, as well as the names of possible candidates for the headship and the reasons for supporting each nominee. Written submissions are to be completed, via Microsoft Forms. Any questions or concerns may be directed to the Faculty Staffing Office at fhsstaffing@queensu.ca. Responses received will remain confidential and will be shared only with the members of the review committee. Anonymous submissions will not be considered.

Renewal, Tenure, Promotion Applications

Under the terms of the Collective Agreement between Queen’s and Queen’s University Faculty Association (QUFA) for faculty, librarians and archivists, Aug. 15, 2022 is the deadline for regular faculty to apply for renewal, tenure or promotion; librarians and archivists to apply for renewal, continuing appointment or promotion; and adjuncts to apply for promotion. Members must notify their unit head of their intent to apply for renewal, tenure, continuing appointment, or promotion by July 1. Articles that refer to these procedures: Article 24 – Employment Equity; Article 30 – Renewal, Tenure and Promotion for Tenure-Track and Tenured Faculty; Article 31 – Renewal, Continuing Appointment and Promotion for Librarian and Archivist Members; Article 32.6 Promotion for Adjunct Faculty.

Staff & Faculty Summer BBQ set for June 8

The annual Queen's Staff & Faculty Summer BBQ will return on Wednesday, June 8.

This year’s event will be held at Agnes Benidickson Field (behind Grant Hall) from 11:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. Hospitality Services will provide the meal with members of the Senior Leadership Team hand to help serve up the food and to personally thank staff and faculty for their service and commitment to Queen’s. A large tent will be set up in case of rain. 

For employees travelling to campus for the BBQ, parking restrictions on surface lots will not be enforced between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. on June 8

MENU
Hamburgers with assorted condiments & toppings (Gluten-free options available)
Eggplant Parmesan – vegetarian option (*also offered without breading and/or cheese)
Coleslaw (Gluten-free)
Pasta Salad
Dessert: Lemon Raspberry cake with streusel topping

Queen’s community invited to join Commuter Challenge

Commuter ChallengeQueen’s University and the City of Kingston are once again taking part in the Commuter Challenge, a friendly competition between Canadian cities and workplaces to encourage Canadians to take active and sustainable forms of transportation. The challenge rewards walking, cycling, carpooling/ride share, taking transit, and telecommuting. 

The Commuter Challenge ties in with the Queen’s Alternative Transportation Working Group’s goals and objectives to enhance the accessibility, efficiency, and sustainability of transportation at Queen’s. The program will also enhance the culture around sustainability and alternative transportation at the university. This will in turn help to achieve the carbon reductions targeted by the Queen’s University Climate Action Plan.  

The contest takes place from June 5-11 and the Queen’s community can take part by registering via the unique team link, and then logging their sustainable transportation throughout the week. 

Participants walk, run, cycle, carpool or take public transit to work and then log these trips at CommuterChallenge.ca. Each kilometre traveled is tallied on the website, as workplaces and cities go head-to-head in a friendly contest to decrease CO2 emissions. Queen’s last participated in 2019 due to the pandemic with 423 participants, 200 more participants than the year before. In 2019, Queen’s had avoided 5,016 kg of CO2 emissions and saved 2,341 litres of fuel. 

Facilities has two videos, created by StudioQ, to promote transit use and the Transpass Program. The City of Kingston will provide a free month for everyone trying transit. Why not give it a try during the week of the Commuter Challenge?

Roll In Breakfast

Roll-in-Breakfast Information

Queen’s will host a Roll-In Breakfast on Tuesday, May 31 in front of the JDUC, at the corner of University Avenue and Union Street, from 7:30 to 9:30 am. Free breakfast and coffee will be available for all individuals who cycle to work as part of Cycle Week (May 29-June 4), organized by Cycle Kingston. 

Watch the Queen's Facilities and City of Kingston Twitter feeds for city-wide events taking place in support of Cycling Week and Commuter Challenge week.

For more information on alternative forms of transportation, please visit the Commuter Services Site.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Campus Community