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Shaping the future of Ontario through policy

The Lieutenant Governor of Ontario and other policy experts visit the School of Policy Studies to kick off the winter speaker series.

  • The Honourable Elizabeth Dowdeswell, the Lieutenant Governor of Ontario, delivers the Donald Gow Memorial Lecture.
    The Honourable Elizabeth Dowdeswell, the Lieutenant Governor of Ontario, delivers the Donald Gow Memorial Lecture.
  • Master's of Public Administration students listen intently to the Lieutenant Governor's thoughts on a year of celebration and reflection of Canada's 150 year history.
    Master of Public Administration students listen intently to the Lieutenant Governor's thoughts on a year of celebration and reflection of Canada's 150 year history.
  • Steve Orsini, Secretary of the Cabinet, Head of the Ontario Public Service, and Clerk of the Executive Council, explores the areas of change that will affect the Ontario public service in the future during his lecture.
    Steve Orsini, Secretary of the Cabinet, Head of the Ontario Public Service, and Clerk of the Executive Council, explores the areas of change that will affect the Ontario public service in the future during his lecture.
  • Mr. Orsini shares his thoughts on the future of the Ontario public service with Master of Public Administration students, and others interested in public policy.
    Mr. Orsini shares his thoughts on the future of the Ontario public service with Master of Public Administration students, and others interested in public policy.

Two standout lectures by experts in the public service kicked off the School of Policy Studies winter 2018 Policy Speaker Series, and there are more to come throughout the winter term.

On Jan. 18, The Honourable Elizabeth Dowdeswell, the Lieutenant Governor of Ontario, delivered the Donald Gow Memorial Lecture to students, faculty, and staff.

The Lieutenant Governor reflected on her experience over the past year attending over 100 Canada 150 events, and her participation in the celebrations marking our country’s history and growth. She reflected on the call for reconciliation from Indigenous communities and discussed the opportunities and challenges facing Ontario in the future in an increasingly globalized and complex world.

“Ontarians have not only a lot to contribute to the world, but also a lot to learn from it – which is both an opportunity, and a responsibility,” said the Lieutenant Governor. “In a time of fake news and echo chambers, when there is a temptation to isolate ourselves, I think we must resist that urge. Ontarians, in my experience, are very good at building bridges, and we can lead by example.”

Steve Orsini, Secretary of the Cabinet, Head of the Ontario Public Service, and Clerk of the Executive Council, spoke Jan. 12 to a packed audience about transforming the Ontario Public Service to adapt to the future. Mr. Orsini focused on the continuing journey of the Ontario public service to become a more client-focused, innovative, efficient, and inclusive organization that is prepared for rapid change.

The Distinguished Lectures and Policy Speaker series will continue to bring eminent academics and public policy experts to Queen’s throughout the term. The speakers are:

  • Marian Campbell Jarvis, Assistant Secretary to the Cabinet, Social Development Policy
  • Kathy Brock, cross-appointed professor, School of Policy Studies and Department of Political Studies
  • Keith Banting, Stauffer Dunning Fellow in the School of Policy Studies and Professor Emeritus in the Department of Political Studies,
  • Marlene Brant Castellano, Professor Emeritus of Trent University, Native Studies Department
  • Natan Obed, President of the Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami and Canada’s National Inuit Leader – The Tom Courchene Distinguished Speaker Series
  • George Thomson, Senior Director – International of Canada’s National Judicial Institute
  • Stephen Poloz, Governor of the Bank of Canada – The David Dodge Lecture, presented this year by the Smith School of Business
  • Robert Wolfe, Professor Emeritus, School of Policy Studies – The J. Douglas Gibson Lecture
  • Shelly Jamieson, Chief Executive Officer of the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer
  • Tim McTiernan, visiting scholar in the School of Policy Studies and former president of the University of Ontario Institute of Technology.

The winter series will run 10 more lectures from Thursday, Feb. 1, to Thursday, March 29. For more information about the winter term lineup, see the Policy Speakers Series website.

Queen’s Engineering recognized for Indigenous outreach

The Queen’s Engineering Outreach office has received a national award for their efforts to engage with Indigenous youth.

A program which has brought class and community workshops, family events, clubs, and camp opportunities to tens of thousands of Indigenous youth across Canada is being recognized with a national education award.

The Queen’s Engineering Outreach team from the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science received the Actua Experience Award – Indigenous Youth in STEM. The award was presented at Actua’s annual awards night in Ottawa Thursday evening. The Canadian charity focuses on science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education among youth.

  • Quinte Mohawk School students program code into tablets, which control these robots as part of an after-school robotics club called Codemakers. (Supplied Photo)
    Quinte Mohawk School students program code into tablets, which control these robots as part of an after-school robotics club called Codemakers. (Supplied Photo)
  • EngWAY is a week-long program operated by the Aboriginal Access to Education group, and is run on the Queen's campus. (Supplied Photo)
    EngWAY is another program operated by the Aboriginal Access to Education group, and is run on the Queen's campus. (Supplied Photo)EngWAY is a week-long program operated by the Aboriginal Access to Education group, and is run on the Queen's campus. (Supplied Photo)
  • Through EngWAY, Indigenous youth in grades 7 and 8 come to live in residence and take engineering design courses related to Indigenous community issues. (Supplied Photo)
    Through EngWAY, Indigenous youth in grades 7 and 8 come to live in residence and take engineering design courses related to Indigenous community issues. (Supplied Photo)
  • The Queen's Engineering Outreach Team accepts their Actua Award. (Photo by Martin Lipman)
    The Queen's Engineering Outreach Team accepts their Actua Award. (Photo by Martin Lipman)

Engineering Outreach runs multiple programs designed to engage Indigenous youth through Aboriginal Access to Engineering (AAE), which was the primary focus of the award. Workshops in partner First Nation grade schools involve hands-on engineering design projects that complement the Ontario science curriculum, integrate robotics in math and language classes, and explore culturally-linked science topics, as examples.

On campus, AAE has hosted Engineering Week for Aboriginal Youth (EngWAY) since 2012. During EngWAY, Indigenous youth in middle school come to stay on campus and take engineering design courses related to Indigenous community issues. AAE also provides bursaries to the Queen’s Summer Engineering Academy for Indigenous high school students, and works in partnership with the student-directed Science Quest program to bring local Indigenous youth to their day camps. In addition, AAE produces a series of comic books about engineering disciplines, featuring Queen's students and graduates, with curriculum-linked plans to help teachers across Canada use them in class.

Outreach, combined with an Indigenous student success program within the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, has resulted in a significant increase of Indigenous students enrolling in Engineering programs at Queen's - from four self-identified students in 2011 to 37 students this academic year.

“Over the past five years, we have engaged more than 20,000 Indigenous youth, and we continue to broaden our outreach to Indigenous communities right across Canada,” says Melanie Howard, Director of Outreach and Aboriginal Access with the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science. “Through our unique model, we partner with teachers and schools to deliver tailored content which matches with math and science curriculum, while paying attention to Indigenous contributions and cultural linkages whenever possible.”

Actua is a network with 35 post-secondary members, including Queen’s. In granting an award to the Queen’s Engineering Outreach team, the selection committee was impressed by their dedication to the key components in Actua's Indigenous STEM outreach goals. In particular, Aboriginal Access to Engineering’s focus on long-term community engagement and high-quality content tied to Indigenous worldviews and STEM delivered by Indigenous instructors and role models were particularly noted.

“Congratulations to the Queen’s Engineering Outreach team on all their efforts, which have culminated in this meaningful award,” says Kevin Deluzio, Dean, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science. “This unique program, which is predominantly run by Indigenous professionals employed by Queen's, has successfully encouraged many Indigenous youth to stay in school and pursue post-secondary studies in the STEM fields. Thank you to Actua for this recognition of our important efforts to diversify the STEM field.”

To learn more about the Aboriginal Access to Engineering program, visit www.aboriginalaccess.ca

New Eyes on the Universe exhibit returns

The SNOLAB exhibit “Eyes on the Universe” has returned to Queen’s and this time it is being hosted by CPARC at Stirling Hall.

The exhibit, which debuted July 1, 2016 at Canada House in London before touring across Canada, features 40 panels the discoveries of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO), the recognition of this work with a Nobel Prize in Physics in 2015 for SNO Director Arthur McDonald, and the facilities and experiments of SNOLAB.

Video kiosks let visitors explore themes and offer a virtual tour of SNOLAB. A life-size “Virtual Art” presents information from Dr. McDonald about the work of SNO and SNOLAB and his perspective on the future. A diffusion cloud chamber also allows the public to see particle tracts in real time, making the invisible visible.

The awarding of the Nobel Prize to Arthur McDonald and Japanese physicist Takaaki Kajita is featured through images from Nobel Week in Stockholm and a display of the Nobel Medal, citation and artwork. Exhibit artifacts include unique detector components developed especially for SNO, as well as a scale model of the SNO detector.

The exhibit is open to the public Monday to Friday, 9:30 am to 4:30 pm, at the CPARC Visitor Centre, Stirling Hall, Room 302, until Friday, Feb. 23. Admission is free. For information on tour bookings, contact Nathalie Ouellette at 613-533-6000 ext. 74781.

Strengthening Indigenous voices

Kanonhsyonne (Janice Hill) accepted the new role of Director, Indigenous Initiatives in October. 

Kanonhsyonne (Janice Hill) accepted the new role of Director, Indigenous Initiatives in October. The Gazette caught up with her to find out more about her priorities for the year ahead.

Kanonhsyonne (Janice Hill). (Supplied Photo)
Kanonhsyonne (Janice Hill). (Supplied Photo)

Since transitioning to your new role, what have you been working on?

To start, we have been working on a vision, mission, and values for the Office of Indigenous Initiatives. At the same time, we have been discussing a second vision statement which would capture Queen’s commitment to Indigenous communities. The purpose of these statements is to ensure we are working together in right relations with the Anishinaabe and Haudenosaunee peoples.

For now, the Office of Indigenous Initiatives is just me with support from the Provost’s Office. I am preparing to hire additional staff, and also working to form an implementation roundtable and team who will assist with the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Task Force report recommendations.

As I plan for the year ahead, I am keeping in mind both Haudenosaunee and Anishinaabe cultural values, working to marry them together to create cohesive plans which reflect both.

I am happy to say that students still come to see me, seeking advice and help with some aspect of their life on campus. I help them work their way through the system here. Housing is one difficult topic, as Indigenous students often don’t receive enough funding to afford a place to live in Kingston on top of tuition and other living expenses.

We are also working to identify potential space on campus to complement Four Directions. The ‘two-eyed seeing’ space would incorporate both western and Indigenous perspectives and ideally incorporate inside and outdoors space, allowing for smudging. We would use this for teaching, learning, and gathering.

This would also be space for ceremony and for sharing – not just ideas but also food. Food is important in our cultures. When we eat together, we relate to each other on a different level and it makes us like family. Food is part of the gifts that we were given. We honour it and we bring that into everything we do.

 

How do we make Queen’s a place that is more welcoming of and respecting of Indigenous values?

Kanonhsyonne (Jan Hill) speaks at a ceremony unveiling the Queen's Remembers Indigenous plinth, located on McGibbon Walk. (University Communications)
Kanonhsyonne (Janice Hill) speaks at a ceremony unveiling the Queen's Remembers Indigenous plinth, located on McGibbon Walk. (University Communications)

At first glance, this includes projects like art and statues and plinths which help to raise attention to Indigenous matters. At a deeper level, it is about looking at policy and governance, and seeking ways to incorporate Indigenous voice.

It is about considering how we think about things – knowledge, methodologies, and research and how we conduct it, especially with Indigenous communities. The aim is to create an understanding on every level – how we relate to each other, what our values are, and how we communicate. Try walking in someone's moccasins for a mile.

The Haudenosaunee values of having a good mind, walking in peace; and the Anishinaabe values of trust, humility, courage, bravery, and wisdom, among others, are important to consider in our relationship building. It is important we conduct ourselves according to these things and reflect those values in the way we relate to each other, our students, and our community.

 

What are the next steps for truth and reconciliation at Queen’s?

As I said, we will be forming an implementation team to support the execution of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Task Force as well as some of the national recommendations.

Part of that group’s work will be an environmental scan so we know what is underway and identify gaps. There is a lot of work already underway and I think we can help ensure it is done efficiently and done well.

As part of my work with the Ontario Council on Articulation and Transfer, I am working with colleagues to try to build seamless transitions for Indigenous students between colleges, universities, and Aboriginal institutes.

We are also looking at how to provide more ‘wrap-around’ services for students from application to graduation. This would include academic, social, cultural, and spiritual support. It’s a bit of an expansion from the level of support we provide today at Queen’s.

We are also working with Advancement to build a strategy for philanthropic initiatives which will support the work of implementing the Task Force recommendations across all facets of the university.

 

What are some recent accomplishments that you are most proud of?

Learn more about Kanonhsyonne (Janice Hill):
First Director of Indigenous Initiatives appointed

Leader of Four Directions, Clan Mother, and mentor to many

Aboriginal leaders, mental health advocate among QUAA award recipients

Unveiling the plinth recognizing the impact Indigenous Peoples have had on Queen’s was pretty amazing.

I am proud to have received the Distinguished Service Award in November. I will also be receiving the Alumni Association Mentorship award in March, but I am even more excited about Marlene Brant-Castellano (Arts’55, LLD’91) receiving the Alumni Achievement Award at the same time.

We also recently held a workshop in partnership with the Aboriginal Council of Queen’s University (ACQU), the School of Graduate Studies, and the Four Directions Aboriginal Student Centre (FDASC) about conducting research with Indigenous communities. The response was very positive, with over 80 people attending – and not only students and faculty from the humanities and social sciences, but from the applied sciences as well.

At the end of the event, people told us they wanted more…so there will be follow-up events. 

Senate committee vacancies are now posted

The University Secretariat is inviting all faculty, staff, and students to put their names forward for membership on Senate committees. 

The Senate has five standing committees and also appoints members to a range of other committees at Queen’s. Details about all existing vacancies are listed on the vacancies page

  • Committee terms are usually for two years, with the number of meetings per year depending on the particular committee's area of responsibility.
  • Most terms will start Sept. 1, but any exceptions are listed next to the committee name on the vacancies page.

Senate committees discuss issues of broad interest to the academic community and make recommendations on policy and practice that are essential to the university's operations and evolution. Committee work allows members to directly affect the way Queen's functions as a teaching and research institution, and as a community of scholars, students, and staff.

The application deadline is Feb. 9.

Contact senate@queensu.ca if you have any questions.

New campus food app launched

Features for faculty, staff and students include hours, menus and prizes.

There are many food options on campus for faculty, staff and students, and Queen’s Hospitality Services is making it easier to access information about what’s open when, and what’s on the menu.

Queen's Food App
The Queen’s Hospitality Services App is available for both iphone and android devices.

The new Queen’s Hospitality Services App is launching this month for both iphone and android.

It will feature daily specials, menus, contests, hours of operation, a list of locations connected to Google maps, events, a rewards program, a feedback mechanism and contact information for the executive chef and the in-house dietician.

“Everyone is always on their phone,” says Kimberly Gascoigne, Sodexo Marketing Manager, Hospitality Services. “We asked students what they would want in an app that could help them more easily access all the offerings on campus that fit their schedule and diet. We hope faculty, staff and students will find it useful and let us know what they think so we can continually enhance it.”

Coming soon to the app – mobile pre-ordering for meal plan holders at select locations to avoid any lines.

Learn more: http://dining.queensu.ca/carousel/hospitality-services-app

Gaels beat Gee-Gees for first time in nearly a decade

Jaz Bains puts up a shot in men's basketball
Jaz Bains of the Queen's Gaels men's basketball team puts up a jump shot. The Gaels beat the Ottawa Gee-Gees 84-66 on Saturday. (Photo by Ian MacAlpine)

A quick roundup of Gaels teams and athletes in competition over the weekend:

MEN’S BASKETBALL

The Queen's Gaels (9-5) upset the No. 7 Ottawa Gee-Gees (11-3) in an electrifying 84-66 victory at the  ARC. The win is the first for the Gaels in 17 meetings with the Gee-Gees dating back to Feb. 8, 2008.

The Gaels took over in the second half after Ottawa had a 40-35 lead at the break. The first five minutes of the second half saw the Gaels go on a 17-4 run while dominating the boards.

Mike Shoveller finished with 22 points, 11 rebounds , three blocks and four assists for a big night while Jaz Bains added 17 points five assists.

On Friday, the Gaels fell 97-68 to the No.1 Carleton Ravens (13-0) at the ARC.

The Ravens opened with a 9-0 run but the Gaels battled back for a 20-17 lead at the end of the first quarter.

However, the Ravens are the top team in the country for a reason and regained control of the game. Shoveller led the scoring for the Gaels with 13 points and Bains had 10 points.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

The No. 7 Gaels (11-3) were upset 61-53 by the Ottawa Gee-Gees (9-5) on Sunday to cap off a tough weekend.

The Gee-Gees went on a 13-0 run in the first quarter to take control of the game and closed out the first half up 35-21. The Gaels would stay within reach but could never fully close the gap in the second half.

Andrea Priamo had 12 points and Abby Dixon had 11.

On Friday, the Gaels tumbled 49-39 against the No. 4 Carleton Ravens (12-0) 49-39 in a low scoring defensive affair that was a rematch of last year's OUA Critelli Cup and U SPORTS bronze medal games.

The Gaels got off to a slow start and trailed 16-4 after the first quarter. They closed the gap to 24-17 at the half but the stingy Carleton defence held on for the win.

Marianne Alarie scored 11 points and Veronika Lavergne and Emma Ritcey each finished with eight points.

MEN’S HOCKEY

The Queen's Gaels (11-6-3) dropped a 4-2 decision to the No. 8 Concordia Stingers (14-3-3) in Montreal on Saturday.

Concordia took the early lead with a pair of goals in the first before Alex Row responded for the Gaels to cut the lead to 2-1. Eric Ming then tied it up in the second period with his fourth of the season but Concordia would net the winner in the third period and add an empty-netter. Kevin Bailie made 32 saves for the Gaels.

On Friday the Gaels were blanked 3-0 by the No.  5 McGill Redmen. The Redmen outshot the Gaels 45-18 with Bailie keeping it close for much of the game. McGill would score twice in the second and add another in the third.

WOMEN’S HOCKEY

The No. 8 Queen's Gaels (9-3-1-3) dropped a tough 4-3 overtime decision to the Ryerson Rams (4-5-4-2) on Saturday.

Amber Healey opened the scoring for the Gaels with a power-play marker in the first period, and then Katrina Manoukarakis added a second to put Queen’s up 2-1 before the first intermission. Hailey Wilson put the Gaels up 3-1 in the second period but the Rams would respond with goals in the second and third period before netting the winner in overtime. Mackenzy Arsenault made 29 saves for the Gaels.

On Friday, the Gaels dominated the Brock Badgers (7-4-3-2) for a 3-0 win. Stephanie Pascal made 24 saves for the shutout while Manoukarakis, Jessica Wakefield and Addi Halladay scored for the Gaels.

WOMEN’S VOLLEYBALL

The Queen's Gaels (7-3) were victorious Sunday, sweeping the Nipissing Lakers (6-3) 25-14, 25-21 and 25-23.

The Gaels controlled the match with Shannon Neville leading the attack with 16 kills and an ace while Sierra Hardy finished with 29 assists.

On Saturday the Gaels lost a tough five-setter to the York Lions (6-2) 25-23, 25-20, 21-25, 22-25 and 12-15.

After winning a pair of close sets, the Lions roared back to claim the win on home court. Julia Wiercigroch led with 17 kills, one ace and four blocks.

MEN’S VOLLEYBALL

The Queen’s Gaels (4-5) were defeated by the Nipissing Lakers (5-4) in four sets 20-25, 25-18, 20-25 and 24-26.

In a tight matchup the Lakers were able to find an edge in the final two sets for the win.  Markus Trence finished with 16 kills and a block while Thomas Ellison had 35 assists.

On Saturday, the Gaels fell in five sets to a strong York Lions (7-1) team 26-24, 14-25, 25-21, 23-25, and 7-15. After the Gaels went up two sets to one the Lions were able to tie it up and claim the final set easily.

Jack Peckham had a strong game with 10 kills and seven blocks while Trence added 10 kills of his own.

Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities affect your devices

Over the past few weeks, international cybersecurity researchers announced they had discovered two significant hardware vulnerabilities called Meltdown and Spectre. The vulnerabilities affect Intel, AMD, ARM and other chips used in all modern devices.

How does this affect me?

Most devices - from smartphones to hardware in data centres - may be vulnerable to some extent. Both Meltdown and Spectre consist of attacks against modern CPU microprocessors that can result in unauthorized code reading data it should not have access to. Vendors are working on (or have already released) patches to mitigate the issue.  

How can I protect myself?

Updates for systems managed by ITS will begin next Tuesday, Jan. 16. Additional updates will follow. Please install updates as you are alerted.

Be vigilant in checking for updates and patches over the coming weeks, and update as soon as they become available. Also ensure your anti-virus software remains up-to-date. Please spread the word with your colleagues, friends, and family.

For more information about Meltdown and Spectre, you can visit: http://www.techradar.com/how-to/how-to-protect-against-the-meltdown-and-spectre-cpu-security-flaws

 

 

QICSI opens up to the community

The annual Summer Initiative entrepreneurship bootcamp is now allowing non-student ventures the opportunity to be mentored by Queen’s.

New ventures seeking support in Kingston have a new resource available to help them get their businesses launched. The annual Queen’s Innovation Centre Summer Initiative (QICSI) program is being expanded, with a new stream being added to welcome community ventures to the program.

An entrepreneur looks at a board full of possibilities.
An entrepreneur looks at a board full of possibilities. (Supplied Photo)

Traditionally, QICSI supports only Queen’s students through its summer bootcamp by linking them with seed funding, a stipend, and intensive training and mentorship to further their venture. This year, QICSI will also open up new spots for community ventures who will also receive funding and support to help their business.

Community ventures participating in QICSI 2018:

Focus Forward for Indigenous Youth: Collaborates with Indigenous communities across Canada, empowering youth through locally developed trades-based education to strengthen Individuals’ and communities’ futures.
AquaSwift: A water analytics company focused on providing water organizations and rural homeowners an effective way to track and monitor their water levels. 
Firefi Loyalty: A lower cost alternative to expensive loyalty programs that actually rewards you for spending money at the places you love.
CTRLGate: A security startup that focuses on community management software for gated communities, tracking each visitor and service worker entering and exiting a community while providing reporting tools in the event of an incident. 
Illumirnate: A portable environmental solution to current medical systems that provide oxygen. 
PhysioNow: A mobile interactive application for the treatment of back pain as an alternative to in-clinic physiotherapy to address the disparities that exist among chronic pain patients and empower these patients.

“This is the natural evolution for us – taking the QICSI model and expanding it out to include the community,” says Greg Bavington (Sc’85), Executive Director of the Dunin-Deshpande Queen’s Innovation Centre (DDQIC). “Queen’s is a key driver in Kingston’s innovation ecosystem, and using what we have to help more ventures succeed is another way we are demonstrating our leadership and expertise.”

In addition to the Queen’s student teams who join the bootcamp, six local ventures qualified for a place in QICSI 2018 after their strong performance in the Fall Pitch Competition. Next, these companies will interview with the DDQIC before a final decision is made. One of the competitors includes Focus Forward for Indigenous Youth – a not-for-profit which previously received funding from the DDQIC.

In addition to expanding the bootcamp, the DDQIC is supporting a number of community ventures and Queen’s student ventures who are simply seeking funding. Recently, the centre gave $30,000 to five local ventures who applied for support through the Fall Regional Pitch Competition. The companies funded include startups like Savori, Lukabox, and Spectrum Academy, and QICSI alumni Monetta Technologies and Lowegistics Agrictulture.

“The new funding allows us to expand our alpha test and hire a software development intern over the 2018 summer,” says Thiago De Oliveira (Sci’17), one of the original co-founders of Monetta. “We are scheduled to release the second prototype sometime in the next three months and have sent an early version out to the 64 alpha teams that have signed up before the end of the year.”

Similar to the Fall Pitch Competition, the DDQIC will also be hosting a Winter Pitch Competition where funding will be available to local ventures seeking support.

The 2018 QICSI bootcamp will begin in May. For more information on QICSI and Winter Pitch Competition timelines, visit queensu.ca/innovationcentre

Want to learn more about QICSI? Watch this short video:

Innovation and Wellness Centre website launched

As construction continues on the IWC, stay up to date and learn more about the project through this new website.

A website has been launched to provide updates and information about the Innovation and Wellness Centre project. 

The website, queensu.ca/connect/innovationandwellness, features background information on the project, renderings and photos, and all news stories about the IWC. The site will be used to support the communications efforts leading up to the centre's Fall 2018 opening.

The Innovation and Wellness Centre will be a place where every aspect of campus life intersects. It will be a place where students from all programs come to access wellness services and learn about entrepreneurship supports on campus, and it will also be a place that supports leading-edge engineering education and research.

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