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Bringing Indigenous stories to the stage

[Tanya Talaga]
This year's speaker for the MacClement lecture is Tanya Talaga, award-winning journalist and author of Seven Fallen Feathers. (Supplied Photo)

Award-winning journalist and author Tanya Talaga is this year’s speaker for the MacClement Lecture, hosted by the Faculty of Education.

Talaga will speak on Indigenous education, health, and the responsibility for all of us to take an active role in reconciliation.  The event will take place Thursday, Sept. 26 at 5 pm at Duncan MacArthur Hall

The First Ojibway woman to deliver the CBC Massey Lectures, Talaga is an acclaimed storyteller. Her book Seven Fallen Feathers, a national bestseller that introduced seven Indigenous high school students who mysteriously died in Thunder Bay, won the 2018 RBC Taylor Prize.

In her powerful keynotes, Talaga shares Indigenous stories from across Canada and the world, humanizing the legacy of cultural genocide and sharing her hope for a more inclusive and equitable future. 

“I am so looking forward to hearing Tanya Talaga speak. Her book, Seven Fallen Feathers, should be read by every adult (full stop),” says Elder-in-Residence for the Faculty of Education Deb St. Amant. “I am thankful that she listened to the Elders who wanted her to write about this important topic. She has an incredible gift for telling the truths of Indigenous experience.”

The lecture is free to attend and open to the public. More information is available on the Faculty of Education website.

The MacClement Lectureship was established in 1985 by friends and family in memory of William T. MacClement, a former professor of biology at Queen’s who helped establish a successful summer school at the university.

For the past 20 years, Talaga has worked as a journalist, and now columnist, for The Toronto Star. She has authored two books – All Our Relations: Finding The Path Forward and Seven Fallen Feathers. In addition to the RBC Taylor Prize, Seven Fallen Feathers also won the Shaughnessy Cohen Prize for Political Writing, and the First Nation Communities Read: Young Adult/Adult Award. It was also a finalist for the Hilary Weston Writers’ Trust Nonfiction Prize and the BC National Award for Nonfiction, and was named CBC’s Nonfiction Book of the Year and a Globe and Mail Top 100 Book.

(This article has been updated to correct the date to Thursday, Sept. 26)

Sustainability Week running Sept. 29 - Oct. 3

Sustainability Week at Queen’s is just around the corner, starting on Sunday, Sept. 29 and ending on Thursday, Oct. 3. Now in its eighth year, Sustainability Week will feature five days of events that aim to engage and inspire members of the university community to be more conscious of the environment and to be proactive in reducing their carbon footprint.

Each of the five days will feature events and activities which focus on a specific theme: Explore, Act, Inspire, Eat, and Engage.  Sustainability Week brings together Queen’s staff, faculty, students and Kingston businesses to host a variety of events throughout the week that highlight different aspects of sustainability and discuss how we as individuals and as a community are tackling climate change.

More than 40 collaborating partners are working together to make Sustainability Week possible, from Kingston businesses and organizations to Queen’s student groups and the university administration.

No matter what area of their lives people want to become greener in, Sustainability Week has something for them. There are a variety of workshops that will teach people practical skills they can learn to become more sustainable in everyday life, including clothing repair, eco parenting, and making reusable beeswax wraps.

The program also offers opportunities to build community and learn new ways of thinking about the environment. There will be several documentary screenings, a speaker series, an activism workshop, a group hike, a trivia contest, and many other opportunities for people to connect with the green community on campus and in Kingston.

For the full schedule of events, visit the Sustainability Week website.

Saint Mary's of the Lake resurfacing of east parking lot

 

Queen’s is currently resurfacing the parking lot on the east side of its property along Union Street that was the former Saint Mary’s of the Lake Hospital. Work is expected to wrap up by the end of the week.

The lot is being resurfaced in order to improve parking and is in keeping with the University’s stated intent to use the available parking area when the purchase was announced last December. Queen’s University purchased the St. Mary’s of the Lake property from Providence Care on Nov. 30, 2017.

Nominations sought for 2019 Special Recognition for Staff Award

Don't be late – nominate!

Do you know a staff member or team that goes above and beyond to make Queen’s University a great place to work and study?

Nominations for the 2019 Special Recognition for Staff Award are now being accepted. The deadline to submit a nomination is Tuesday, Oct. 15.

The Special Recognition for Staff Award recognizes staff members who consistently provide outstanding contributions during their workday, directly or indirectly, to the learning and working environment at Queen's University at a level significantly beyond what is usually expected (e.g. improving the workplace efficiency, quality of worklife, customer service, problem-solving, etc.)

Information and nomination forms are available on the Queen’s Human Resources website.

 

 

Keeping reconciliation at the forefront

A quote from Justice Murray Sinclair now adorns the walls of the Queen's Faculty of Law building thanks to the support of Law'18.

Murray Sinclair quote
The Queen’s Law atrium now features a short but powerful quote by Senator Murray Sinclair, Chief Commissioner of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, thanks to a class gift by Law’18. (University Communications)

“The road we travel is equal in importance to the destination we seek. There are no shortcuts. When it comes to truth and reconciliation we are forced to go the distance.”

These are the words of Senator Murray Sinclair, expressed during his 2009-2015 tenure as Chief Commissioner of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada. These words are also one of the first things people will see when they enter the Queen’s Faculty of Law building, thanks to Law’18.

For their graduating class gift to the school, Law’18 classmates funded the design, production, and installation of the quote in silver lettering on the east wall of the building’s front entrance. 

“Exhibiting the words of Justice Murray Sinclair in the atrium will provide a daily reminder to law students that the journey of reconciliation is far from over, and that they have an important role to play in maintaining its momentum,” says Katrina Crocker, Law’18 Class President. “Additionally, the plaque – located inside a building branded with the name of Canada's first prime minister – will help to achieve a greater balance in that relationship.”

Crocker and the other seven Law’18 council members had put out an open call for classmates to submit ideas for a gift that would allow their graduating class to leave behind something meaningful to the Queen’s Law community.

“After reviewing a handful of proposals, the eight student council members selected the Sinclair quote submission in the interest of advancing reconciliation with Indigenous populations and generating a deeper awareness of the harms for which we are brought to reconcile,” Crocker says. “This short but powerful quote will speak to everyone who reads it and it honours Murray Sinclair’s work with the truth and reconciliation process.”

Sinclair, who served the justice system in Manitoba for over 25 years, was the first Indigenous judge appointed in that province and the second in Canada. He was appointed to the Senate in 2016. 

Law’18 raised a total of $6,900, mainly through social events over their three years in law school. They anticipate they’ll be contributing leftover funds from their class gift campaign to another important cause, the Law ThankQ Fund Bursary.  

Watch how the Sinclair quote was installed in the Queen’s Law atrium.

This latest piece adds to the reconciliation efforts at the Faculty of Law.

On Sept. 28, 2018, a permanent art installation in the Gowling WLG Atrium, paying tribute to Indigenous Peoples.

The piece – Words That Are Lasting – was created by Hannah Claus, a visual artist of English and Kanien'kehÁ:ka / Mohawk ancestries and a member of the Tyendinaga Mohawks of the Bay of Quinte, and features the recreations of seven wampum belts suspended from the Gowling WLG Atrium ceiling. 

This article was originally published on the Queen's Faculty of Law website.

For the Record: Sept. 12, 2019

For the Record provides postings of appointment, committee, grant, award, and other notices set out by collective agreements and university policies and processes. It is the university’s primary vehicle for sharing this information with our community.

The next issue of For the Record will be published Thursday, Sept. 26. The deadline for submitting information is Tuesday, Sept. 24. For the Record is published bi-weekly throughout the academic year and monthly during the summer.

Submit For the Record information for posting to Gazette Editor Andrew Carroll.

APPOINTMENTS

Successful applications for Renewal/Tenure/Promotion 2019

Reappointment/Renewal
Joseph Abunassar, Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology
Amy Acker, Department of Paediatrics
Shamel Addas, Smith School of Business
Ramana Appireddy, Department of Medicine, Division of Neurology
Thomas Barthelmé, Department of Mathematics and Statistics
Pamela Beach, Faculty of Education
Gianluigi Bisleri, Department of Surgery
Michael Blennerhassett, Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology
Mark Bona, Department of Ophthalmology
Suzanne Bridge, Department of Critical Care Medicine
Peggy DeJong, Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology
Genevieve Digby, Department of Medicine, Division of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
Anne Duffy, Department of Psychiatry
Lenora Duhn, School of Nursing
Amir Elmekkawi, Department of Paediatrics
Jay Engel, Department of Surgery
Nora Fayed, School of Rehabilitation Therapy
Harriet Feilotter, Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine
Jennifer Flemming, Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology
Jason Gallivan, Departments of Biomedical & Molecular Sciences and Psychology
Jocelyn Garland, Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology
Katie Goldie, School of Nursing
Karen Grewal, Department of Paediatrics
Javier Adrian Gutierrez, Department of Paediatrics
Christopher Haley, Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine
Andrew Hall, Department of Emergency Medicine
Paul Heffernan, Department of Medicine, Division of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
Richard Henry, Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine
Nicolas Hudon, Department of Chemical Engineering
Felicia Iftene, Department of Psychiatry
Eduard Iliescu, Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology
Jason Izard, Department of Urology
Melanie Jaeger, Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine
Albert Jin, Department of Medicine, Division of Neurology
Cherie Jones-Hiscock, Department of Psychiatry
Pavlo Kalyta, Smith School of Business
Lisa Kelly, Faculty of Law
Lisa Kerr, Faculty of Law
Muhammad Nasar Sayeed Khan, Department of Psychiatry
Vinay Kukreti, Department of Paediatrics
James Landine, Department of Emergency Medicine
Guang Li, Smith School of Business
Peter MacPherson, Department of Paediatrics
Laura Marcotte, Department of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine
Jorge Martinez-Cajas, Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases
Thomas McGregor, Department of Urology
Catherine McLellan, Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology
David Messenger, Department of Emergency Medicine
Laura Milne, Department of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine
Glenio Mizubuti, Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine
Jacqueline Monaghan, Department of Biology
Benvon Moran, Department of Medicine, Division of Dermatology
Sharday Mosurinjohn, School of Religion
Terrence O’Brien, Department of Emergency Medicine
Mark Ormiston, Departments of Biomedical & Molecular Sciences, Medicine and Surgery
Archana Patel, Department of Psychiatry
Stuart Reid, Department of Medicine, Division of Neurology
Colleen Renihan, Dan School of Drama and Music
Neil Renwick, Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine
Taras Reshetukha, Department of Psychiatry
Stacy Ridi, Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine
Mark Ropeleski, Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology
David Ruggles, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Mahmoud Sakran, Department of Paediatrics
Anupam Sehgal, Department of Paediatrics
Claudio Soares, Department of Psychiatry
Siddhartha Srivastava, Department of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine
Kevin Stamplecoskie, Department of Chemistry
Victoria Sytsma, Department of Sociology
Amar Thakrar, Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology
Sonal Varma, Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine
Gustavo Vazquez, Department of Psychiatry
Ashley Waddington, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Nishardi Waidyaratne-Wijeratne, Department of Psychiatry
Ami Wang, Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine
Jue Wang, Smith School of Business
Shayna Watson, Department of Family Medicine
Jeffrey Yach, Department of Surgery
Keren Zaiontz, Department of Film and Media

Reappointment and Promotion to Associate Professor
David Maslove, Department of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine

Reappointment and Promotion to Professor
Bingshu Chen, Department of Public Health Sciences
Karen Yeates, Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology

Tenure
Damon Dagnon, Department of Emergency Medicine

Tenure and Promotion to Associate Professor
Heather Aldersey, School of Rehabilitation Therapy
Frances Bonier, Department of Biology
Jacob Brower, Smith School of Business
Pierre Chaigneau, Smith School of Business
Heidi Cramm, School of Rehabilitation Therapy
Colleen Davison, Department of Public Health Sciences
Carlos Escobedo, Department of Chemical Engineering
Ahmad Ghahreman, Robert M. Buchan Department of Mining
Bahman Gharesifard, Department of Mathematics and Statistics
Gail Henderson, Faculty of Law
Rosaleen Hill, Department of Art History and Art Conservation
Yu Hou, Smith School of Business
Lindsay Morcom, Faculty of Education
Dylan Robinson, Faculty of Arts and Science
Yi Ning Strube, Department of Ophthalmology
Tandy Thomas, Smith School of Business
Ning Zhang, Smith School of Business

Tenure and Promotion to Professor
Rachel Holden, Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology

Promotion to Assistant Professor
Dianne Baird, Dan School of Drama and Music
Megan Edgelow, School of Rehabilitation Therapy
Susanne Murphy, School of Rehabilitation Therapy
Wendy Powley, School of Computing

Promotion to Associate Professor  
Yuka Asai, Department of Medicine, Division of Dermatology
Jennifer Carpenter, Department of Emergency Medicine
Timothy Hanna, Department of Oncology
Mila Kolar, Department of Surgery
Ron Levy, Department of Surgery
Lysa Boisse Lomax, Department of Medicine, Division of Neurology
Aamer Mahmud, Department of Oncology
Darrin Payne, Department of Surgery
Michael Rauh, Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine
Andrew Robinson, Department of Oncology
Stephen Steele, Department of Urology
Naji Touma, Department of Urology

Promotion to Professor
Gunnar Blohm, Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences
Alexander Braun, Department of Geological Sciences and Geological Engineering
Shehla Burney, Faculty of Education
Theodore Christou, Faculty of Education
Zsuzsa Csergő, Department of Political Studies
Sandra den Otter, Department of History
Bradley Diak, Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering
Aristides Docoslis, Department of Chemical Engineering
Yves Filion, Department of Civil Engineering
Georgia Fotopoulos, Department of Geological Sciences and Geological Engineering
Oded Haklai, Department of Political Studies
Lawrence Hookey, Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology
Il Yong Kim, Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering
Melissa Lafreniere, Department of Geography and Planning
Amy Latimer-Cheung, School of Kinesiology and Health Studies
Steven Lehrer, School of Policy Studies
Rosemary Lysaght, School of Rehabilitation Therapy
Colin MacDougall, Department of Civil Engineering
Katherine McKittrick, Department of Gender Studies
Nicholas Mosey, Department of Chemistry
Beverley Mullings, Department of Geography and Planning
Dorit Naaman, Department of Film and Media
Kip Pegley, Dan School of Drama and Music
Lynnette Purda, Smith School of Business
Leslie Ritchie, Department of English
Armand Ruffo, Department of English
Julie Salverson, Dan School of Drama and Music
Margaret Walker, Dan School of Drama and Music
Awet Weldemichael, Department of History
Cristiana Zaccagnino, Departments of Classics and Languages, Literatures & Cultures

SUCCESSFUL CANDIDATES
Congratulations to the following individuals who were the successful candidates in recent job competitions.

Job Title: Assistant Coach, Women's Volleyball
Department: Athletics and Recreation
Competition: J0819-0323
Successful Candidate: Natasha Spaling

Job Title: Senior Web Developer
Department: Faculty of Health Science, Elentra Consortium
Competition: J0619-1065
Successful Candidate: Bilal Hassan

Job Title: Personal Counsellor - Athletics and Recreation (USW Local 2010)
Department: Student Wellness Services
Competition: J0719-0409
Successful Candidate: Becky Haist (Student Counselling Services)

Job Title: Manager, Security Operations Centre
Department: Information Technology Services
Competition: J0119-0352
Successful Candidate: Ian Lewis

Job Title: Systems Developer (USW Local 2010)
Department: Information Technology Services
Competition: J0419-0934
Successful Candidate: Atif Rahman

Job Title: Department Coordinator and Assistant to Head (USW Local 2010)
Department: Psychology
Competition: J0719-0061
Successful Candidate: Sue Burrows (Biology)

Job Title: Research Grants Financial Administrator (USW Local 2010)
Department: Deans Office, Faculty of Arts and Science
Competition: J0619-0329
Successful Candidate: Amanda Fulker (School of Rehabilitation Therapy)

Job Title: Career Counsellor (USW Local 2010)
Department: Career Services
Competition: J0619-0664
Successful Candidate: Carli Fink

Job Title: Executive Director, Finance and Administration
Department: Office of Vice-Principal (Research)
Competition: J0519-0323
Successful Candidate: Nicole Hunniford (Planning and Budget)

Job Title: Instructor (USW Local 2010)
Department: Queen's School of English
Competition: J0719_0752
Successful Candidate: David Wills, Carrie-Ann Barr, Lloyd Balme, Justine Macdonald, Steven McWilliams, Amie Pilgrim

Job Title: Manager, Budget
Department: Office of Planning and Budget
Competition: J0519-1088
Successful Candidate: Stan Xiao

Job Title: Administrative, Recruitment and Events Coordinator (USW Local 2010)
Department: Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science
Competition: J0519-1095
Successful Candidate: Kendy Sandy

Job Title: Office Assistant (USW Local 2010)
Department: Psychology
Competition: J0319-0385
Successful Candidate: Anja Wilke

Job Title: Associate Director, Curriculum Development and Instructional Design
Department: Continuing and Distance Studies
Competition: J1218-0240
Successful Candidate: Wanda Beyer

Job Title: Graphic Designer (CUPE 254)
Department: University Relations
Competition: J0719-0928
Successful Candidate: Shelley Weir

Job Title: Software Developer: Modelling Galaxies
Department: Physics
Competition: J519-0544
Successful Candidate: Nathan Deg

Job Title: Administrative Assistant
Department: Office of Advancement
Competition: J0719-1179
Successful Candidate: Robert Morgan

Job Title: Review Counsel - Queen's Legal Aid
Department: Faculty of Law
Competition: J0719-0095
Successful Candidate: Justin Turner

Job Title: Information Security Analyst (USW Local 2010)
Department: Information Technology Services
Competition: J0319-0561
Successful Candidate: Bo Chen

Job Title: Systems Developer (USW Local 2010)
Department: Information Technology Services
Competition: J0419-0934
Successful Candidate: Atif Rahman

Job Title: Department Coordinator and Assistant (USW Local 2010)
Department: Psychology
Competition: J0719-0061
Successful Candidate: Susanne Burrows (Biology)

Job Title: Research Grants Financial Administrator (USW Local 2010)
Department: Dean's Office, Faculty of Arts and Science
Competition: J0619-0329
Successful Candidate: Amanda Fulker (School of Rehabilitation Therapy)

Job Title: Program Coordinator & Academic Advisor (USW Local 2010)
Department: School of Nursing
Competition: J0419-1177
Successful Candidate: Shelly West (Awards)

Job Title: Ehtics Coordinator (USW Local 2010)
Department: University Research Services
Competition: J0619-0856
Successful Candidate: Aline Costa Da Silva Asselstine (Medicine)

Job Title: Marketing & Communications Coordinator (USW Local 2010)
Department: Faculty of Health Science Office Operations
Competition: J0619-0084
Successful Candidate: Elizabeth Cooper (Art History)

Job Title: Receptionist (USW Local 2010)
Department: Clinical Education Centre
Competition: J0519-0153
Successful Candidate: Hayley Morgenstern

A new workshop inspires the campus community to embrace sustainability

Sustainability @ Queen's is a workshop in the HR Learning Catalogue that highlights opportunities to help create a culture of sustainability on campus and beyond.

Photo of Nathan Splinter leading workshop participants on a sustainability tour of campus
Nathan Splinter leads workshop participants on a sustainability tour of campus. (University Communications)

As Queen’s works towards its goal of becoming carbon neutral by 2040, it needs the help of the broader campus community. To help educate people on how they can help the university achieve this ambitious goal, the Office of the Vice-Principal (Finance and Administration) has started offering the Sustainability @ Queen’s workshop this year. This workshop will next be offered on Oct. 1, as part of the university’s Sustainability Week program, and Queen’s community members can now register to participate in it through the HR Learning Catalogue.

This half-day workshop has been offered four times since January 2019, and it was run most recently on July 9. Participants in the course learn a variety of strategies to help them adopt more sustainable practices, including how to recycle properly on campus and utilize the organic waste program.

“Creating a culture of sustainability is a priority at Queen’s,” says Donna Janiec, Vice-Principal (Finance and Administration). “The Sustainability @ Queen’s module creates awareness among staff and faculty of the sustainability initiatives currently underway, offers information on how to promote green practices on campus, and solicits ideas from participants on what can be done in the future.”

During the workshop, Nathan Splinter, Manager, Energy and Sustainability with Physical Plant Services (PPS), explains large infrastructural changes that have been undertaken by the university.

To help illustrate the university’s sustainability efforts, Splinter takes participants on a tour of a campus location that showcases some of these changes. In the most recent workshop, for instance, Splinter brought participants to the mechanical penthouse at the top of Stauffer Library, where he showed them how the heating and cooling system there has recently been made more efficient.

In addition to Splinter’s portion of the workshop, there is typically at least one guest speaker from a different part of the university who offers new ways to think about sustainability. Past speakers have addressed topics such as sustainable procurement and Indigenous approaches to the environment.

Sustainability @ Queen’s will be offered again on Oct. 1 and Feb. 4, 2020. Registration is now available through the HR Learning Catalogue

Orientation concludes with weekend events

  • Students at Ontario Hall
    A group of first-year students get their photo taken at Ontario Hall shortly after they received their tams. (Photo by Bernard Clark / Queen's University)
  • Weekend orientation students
    An orientation leader reconnects with her first-year students as orientation events restarted over the weekend. (Photo by Bernard Clark / Queen's University)
  • A group of first-year Arts and Science students get their photo taken with their orientation leaders.
    A group of first-year Arts and Science students get their photo taken with their orientation leaders. (Photo by Bernard Clark / Queen's University)
  • First-year students from the Faculty of Arts and Science receive their tams
    First-year students from the Faculty of Arts and Science fill Grant Hall as they receive their tams, a Queen's University tradition. (Photo by Bernard Clark / Queen's University)
  • First-year students from the Faculty of Arts and Science do the Oil Thigh
    First-year students from the Faculty of Arts and Science and their orientation leaders perform the Oil Thigh. (Photo by Bernard Clark / Queen's University)
  • Members of Queen's Bands perform outside Grant Hall
    Members of Queen's Bands perform outside Grant Hall for incoming first-year students. (Photo by Bernard Clark / Queen's University)

Following their first two days of classes, Queen’s University’s Class of 2023 took part in their final orientation week events over the weekend.

A number of orientation activities were held Friday evening and throughout the weekend, including a special concert, tours of the Athletics and Recreation Centre and Stauffer Library, while the students also received their tams, traditional Scottish-style hats that are handed out to all first-year undergraduate students at Queen’s.

Other events included a Conflict Management Workshop and Academic Skills Workshops run by Peer Learning Assistants from Student Academic Success Services.

Sunday also marked Welcome to Kingston Day, the official orientation to the Kingston campus for students who spent their first year studying at the Bader International Study Centre.

Learn more about the Class of 2023.

Health Sciences creates a brand-new orientation

The first on-campus health sciences students have arrived on campus, and have already made new orientation traditions.

Photo of Health Sciences orientation event
First-year Bachelor of Health Sciences students celebrating orientation week.

Queen’s is known for its colourful and proud orientation week. Each faculty or program has its own set of colours, chants, and traditions that welcome new students to the university every fall. But one group of students this year is experiencing a brand-new orientation: the incoming Bachelor of Health Sciences (BHSc) students.

The BHSc launched as an online program in 2016, and this fall has started offering a full-time on-campus program as well. The program received over 4,000 applications for its first cohort and has admitted approximately 125 students. Housed in the Faculty of Health Sciences (FHS), the BHSc is a course of study that prepares undergraduate students to pursue a career in health professions, such as medicine, physical therapy, and pharmacy.

As it prepared for this new group of students, FHS needed to create a new orientation to usher them into life at Queen’s.

This situation, however, presented an obstacle. Normally, faculty orientations at Queen’s are led by upper-year students in those programs. Each orientation has an orientation chair, a student who oversees the organization of all activities. But, as a new program, the on-campus BHSc did not have any upper-year students to choose from to be their orientation chair.

To fill this role, the program put out a call to upper year students interested in leading this initiative. Elle Mackenzie, a fourth-year Life Sciences student who had served as an executive for the NEWTS orientation in 2018, was selected and has provided exemplary leadership.  While her prior experience had taught Mackenzie about the work that goes into organizing a series of events, the BHSc posed a new challenge: figuring out how to build an orientation from scratch.

Early on, Mackenzie ran into questions that no one at Queen’s had needed to ask for over a decade. How do you set up a bank account for an orientation group? How do you order tams with a new colour scheme? What name do you choose for orientation leaders?

As Mackenzie started to deal with these issues, she found that she had a large support network to rely on. The members of the Orientation Roundtable, the group that coordinates orientation activities across the university, were especially helpful. She also had the help of administrators in the BHSc program as well as the rest of the team of student organizers, which includes the Health Sciences Executive Committee and the orientation leaders.   

Working together, the Health Sciences Orientation team has developed a program that introduces new health sciences students to academics, social life, and community outreach at Queen’s. The new orientation also mixes some traditional Queen’s events, like coverall painting, with innovative activities. Let’s Get Scrambled, for example, mixed the students into different teams to take part in a game of capture the flag where the flags are eggs.

To introduce students to the innovative format of classes in the BHSc program, the orientation featured a mock lecture. The on-campus Bachelor of Health Sciences program is taught in an innovative flipped classroom format, in which students are asked to actively engage with concepts in class. The mock lecture, then, was an opportunity for students to get used to the kinds of activities they will be doing in their courses.

Getting involved in the Queen’s spirit of community outreach, the new health sciences students also ran a charity fashion show for Supporting Diabetes Canada. The students brought clothes from home to donate for a fashion show, in which they mixed and matched all the garments to create entertaining outfits, which they then modeled for the group. Representatives from Supporting Diabetes Canada attended the fashion show, taught the students about their organization, and then accepted the donated garments after the event.

Despite all the work that they have put into this year’s program, the organizers have also been keeping in mind that the Health Sciences Orientation will need room to evolve as students from the BHSc program gradually take it over in the coming years.

“We wanted to give health sciences students a solid foundation to build on, but we also wanted to make them feel a sense of ownership over their orientation,” says Mackenzie. “I think we’re all looking forward to seeing how these students put their own stamp on things in the future.”

Land donation gives Queen’s access to unique ecosystem

Family commemorates the 100th anniversary of their grandmother’s graduation.

Larry McKeown (MA’86) and his sister, Anna Kelly (Artsci’81, BEd’81), donated land in honour of their grandmother, Kathleen McKeown (Arts 1916).  

Students and researchers have access to ecologically important land and a wider range of plants, animals, and insects for field studies, thanks to the generosity of a Queen’s family.

Larry McKeown (MA’86), and his sister, Anna Kelly (Artsci’81, BEd’81), donated an 18-hectare tract of the Bayview Bog that has been in their family for decades. The land, located along Taylor Kidd Boulevard about 20 minutes west of the Queen’s campus, was donated to honour their grandmother, Kathleen McKeown (nee Ralph), who graduated in 1916 and was a popular member of the Queen’s community.

Biology professor Vicki Friesen is excited the university has access to the land because fieldwork and hands-on learning is an essential part of the Queen’s student experience.

“When students get out in the field, the light in their eyes changes,” says Dr. Friesen. “It’s awesome to see. They learn more by studying organisms and their interactions in nature, rather than pictures and words in a book.  Once you see the plants and animals, they become more real and important.”

Despite the name, the Bayview Bog is actually a type of wetland known as a fen. Only a small amount of water drains out, which makes it very wet and nutrient-poor, so the land is often home to rare plants, insects, and small animals. Fens require thousands of years to develop and cannot be easily restored once destroyed. Fens are also important to reduce the effects of climate change because wetlands absorb large amounts of carbon dioxide.

“A fen is completely different from a forest or a river ecosystem,” says Dr. Friesen. “So Queen’s students now have better access to see and study a wider range of plants and animals out in the wild.”

The McKeowns originally wanted to donate the property directly to Queen’s to commemorate the 100th anniversary of their grandmother’s graduation. But because it was ecologically sensitive land, it was placed under the stewardship of the Cataraqui Region Conservation Authority (CRCA). A partnership between Queen’s and the CRCA allows students and researchers access to the land.

The Bayview Bog is one of several outdoor areas available to Queen’s students and researchers. The most well-known is the Queen’s University Biological Station (QUBS) which opened in 1944 on the shores of Lake Opinicon, 50 kilometres north of Kingston. It has expanded to more than 3,400 hectares and is now one of the top scientific field stations in Canada.   

This article originally appeared on the Queen's Alumni website.

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