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Financial Sustainability

Statement from Principal Woolf on federal budget

On behalf of Queen’s University, I thank the Government of Canada for its continuing support of science, innovation and post-secondary education in Canada. Universities such as Queen’s play a critical role in supporting Canada’s prosperity by creating a highly skilled workforce and fostering innovation and discovery.

I note the government’s commitment to cultivating an innovative economy, including through an investment of nearly $1 billion in innovation clusters. Research universities such as Queen’s serve as anchors to virtually all globally competitive innovative clusters and we look forward to working with the federal government more closely. And we look forward with interest to further details on the Canada 150 Research chairs program.

Budget 2017 also makes significant investments in improving access to post-secondary education and training for adult learners returning to school, part-time students, students with dependent children, veterans and Indigenous students. The government has also included a number of measures in the budget that will have a significant impact on women, including through creating more opportunities in the workforce and promoting inclusive economic growth.

Queen’s also welcomes the federal government’s additional investment of $221 million over five years to create 10,000 work-integrated learning opportunities through Mitacs, as well as the government’s commitment to work with the provinces, the private sector, and postsecondary institutions to support skills development.

We look forward to further details of these programs, and to the release of the much anticipated fundamental science review.

Daniel Woolf,
Principal and Vice-Chancellor
Queen’s University

Moving forward on benefits review

Work continues on the comprehensive review of Queen’s employee benefits plan, following successful education and consultation activities last fall.

The Multi-Employee Group Employee Benefits Committee, which is comprised of participants from university employee groups and the university’s benefits consultant, Mercer, co-ordinated the activities.

“We are pleased so many employees took the opportunity to ask questions at the sessions and provide feedback through the survey,” says Dan Bradshaw, Associate Vice-Principal (Human Resources). “This input will be invaluable to the committee.”

Queen’s Human Resources hosted nine employee education sessions between Oct. 19 and Nov. 2. Approximately 600 employees from various employee groups attended the sessions, where they learned more about the employee benefits plan and had the opportunity to ask questions.

The PowerPoint slides from the education sessions with audio narrative are available on the HR website for employees who wish to view them again and for those who were unable to attend. 

HR followed up the education sessions with an electronic survey, which was sent to all Queen’s employees who are eligible for insured benefits. The response rate was high, with nearly 50 per cent of individuals filling out the survey. Mercer, the university’s benefits consultant, is currently reviewing the responses, which will help inform the committee’s work.

More information about the employee benefits review is available on the HR website. Employees can send questions about the project to benefits.project@queensu.ca.

Reducing energy use an ongoing effort

The following article is the first in a monthly series focused on the work by Queen’s and Physical Plant Services to reduce energy consumption by the university. 

[Nathan Splinter]
Energy managment at Queen’s has been an ongoing effort for more than 20 years. Currently, Energy Manager Nathan Splinter is leading the effort to reduce energy comsumption at the university. (University Communications)

Each year Queen’s University spends about $18 million to $20 million on utilities, electricity prime among them.

Finding any way to reduce the final bill has a significant impact. Add to that the fact that most energy saving measures also reduce the environmental impact of the university, and it’s a win-win.

“Energy management has been a focus for Physical Plant Services (PPS) at Queen’s for more than 20 years”, explains Nathan Splinter, Energy Manager. 

However, with the cost of utilities climbing, there is more of an emphasis on the effort than ever.

Looking at it from an infrastructure angle, Queen’s is a massive, multifaceted facility, stretching over multiple campuses with a mix of buildings from cutting-edge modern to classic Victorian. Not surprisingly, PPS has a wide range of projects on the go, but all support a common theme – reducing the amount of energy that Queen’s uses. 

With new buildings this effort starts at the planning stage, Mr. Splinter says.

“We’ve engrained energy management into our building standards,” he says. “Queen’s has a set of building standards that incorporate an energy focus and that has enabled  the establishment of a good energy management reference point for buildings. The results can be seen in some of the university’s recent buildings including the School of Kinesiology and Health Sciences and Goodes Hall, which achieved Leadership in Energy and Engineering Design (LEED) recognition. The Integrated Learning Centre also received similar recognition with the Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method (BREEAM) certification.”

These new buildings are at the pinnacle of energy efficiency while some other existing buildings require retrofitting. 

A good example of this retrofit type of work occurred in Innovation Park recently. Mr. Splinter points out that $2.5 million was invested in upgrading the infrastructure of the sprawling building, including replacing all the lighting and chillers, resulting in reduced energy consumption. 

Lab ventilation was also improved by installing six high-plume exhaust fans, replacing 80 small independent stacks, resulting in better air quality and energy conservation.

Water consumption was another focus. 

“We reduced the water consumption from and 100-150 cubic meters a day to an average of about 5 cubic meters,” Mr. Splinter says. “This resulted in substantial cost savings for the facility.”

Each project requires a significant investment and the best technologies tend to be more expensive. However, by taking advantage of available incentives and grants the initial cost is reduced.  The savings on utility charges then pay for the initial expenditure in periods as short as four or five years.

“An average lighting project sees a 40 per cent to 60 per cent reduction in the electrical demand which is phenomenal,” Mr. Splinter says. “That’s the rationale for doing those type of projects. It’s a pretty exciting time. There are a lot of provincial grants to incentivize this type of work that we have been successful in securing.” 

To date Queen’s has received over $200,000 in grants to support energy conservation projects on campus.

Looking ahead, PPS is planning to introduce a new metering system that will allow them and the Queen’s community to monitor consumption for electricity, water, steam and natural gas in real time, providing valuable data immediately rather than waiting for the typical monthly reading.

“It’s essential to have enough data to do proper research and know what’s happening within our buildings,” Mr. Splinter says. “The metering project is really exciting and what we want to do as part of the project is create a public-facing dashboard so people can go online and see what they are currently consuming for water or what they are using for electricity.”

The end result will hopefully be greater awareness and knowledge about energy management, and that excites Mr. Splinter.

Supporting research infrastructure

Three Queen's-affiliated research facilities receive funding from Canada Foundation for Innovation.

Three Queen’s University-affiliated research facilities have received a combined $44.25 million in support from the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) under the Major Science Initiatives (MSI) Fund. The three Queen's-affiliated facilities accounted for 13.5 per cent of the $328.5 million in total MSI funding awarded in the 2017-2022 competition cycle. In addition, nearly 17 per cent of the facilities funded (three out of 18) are affiliated with Queen’s University.

“Today’s leading-edge research, particularly large-scale collaborative research projects, can be very expensive to undertake due to the extensive infrastructure needed and the indirect costs of maintaining facilities,” says Daniel Woolf, Principal of Queen’s University. “The funding announced today is critical to ensuring that these prominent research centres can continue to operate and remain competitive, while providing opportunities for researchers at Queen’s and across Canada to continue their groundbreaking research.”

The fund supports ongoing operations and maintenance costs for a select group of national research facilities which serve as hubs for collaboration and contribute to Canada’s reputation as a global leader in research and innovation. Through these facilities, researchers at Queen’s gain access to leading edge infrastructure – aiding them in addressing some of the most important issues facing society and probing the deepest mysteries of the universe.

The Canadian Cancer Trials Group has received a five-year, $8.68 million grant to support its Operations and Statistics Centre at Queen’s. CCTG is a cancer research cooperative that provides the expertise and infrastructure for researchers to conduct national and international phase I-III cancer clinical trials. From its centre at Queen's, CCTG has supported over 500 trials in over 40 countries, aimed at improving survival rates and quality of life for cancer patients around the world.

SNOLAB has received a three-year, $28.57 million grant from CFI, in support of the lab’s continued operation. Born out of the Queen’s-led Sudbury Neutrino Observatory – for which Arthur McDonald was named the co-recipient of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics – SNOLAB is one of only a handful of underground laboratories worldwide capable of supporting the current and future generations of subatomic and astroparticle physics experiments, seeking to unlock the mysteries of the universe. The work conducted as part of the SNO collaboration and subsequently at SNOLAB has led to groundbreaking results cementing Canada’s, and Queen’s, reputation as a world leader in the field.  Building on this history of success, Queen’s is home to Gilles Gerbier, the Canada Excellence Research Chair in Particle Astrophysics. SNOLAB continues to attract top-flight scientific collaborations, including the recently-announced Canadian Particle Astrophysics Research Centre (CPARC).

Recognized worldwide for their work advancing innovation in micro-nano technologies, CMC Microsystems has received a three-year, $7 million grant from CFI, with the option to apply for an additional two years. The funding will support researchers across Canada’s National Design Network by providing state-of-the-art commercial design tools, expertise and industrial connections for research and development in advanced smart technologies. The long-term goal is to foster Canadian leadership in advanced technology manufacturing and establish Canada as a global technology leader. Queen’s contracts with CMC to manage CFI funds granted to Queen’s as part of Canada’s National Design Network.

“Through the MSI program the Government of Canada clearly recognizes the importance of sustaining key research platforms, and supporting large-scale collaborations that are conducting leading-edge research with global impact,” says Steven Liss, Vice-Principal (Research).  “This support is crucial to the success of our leading research facilities as the funds enable our faculty, students, and post-doctoral fellows, as well as our collaborators to access state-of-the-art research infrastructure required to undertake their seminal research programs.”

Created in 1997, the Canada Foundation for Innovation makes financial contributions to Canada’s universities, colleges, research hospitals and non-profit research organizations to increase their capability to carry out high quality research. The foundation provides funding to eligible Canadian institutions, through a rigorous competitive and independent merit-review process, through a suite of funds. Funding is awarded based on the quality of the research proposed and its need for infrastructure, its contribution to strengthening the capacity for innovation and the potential benefits of the research to Canada.

For more information on the Canada Foundation for Innovation, or the Major Science Initiatives Fund, please visit the website.

Queen's to update responsible investing policy

Individuals and groups invited to submit feedback on revised policy. 

The university is in the process of updating its responsible investing policy following recommendations made by the Principal’s Advisory Committee on Divestment: Fossil Fuels in its October 2015 final report. The report highlighted interpretive difficulties in applying the existing policy, the Queen’s University Statement on Responsible Investing, which was approved in 2009. The purpose of the new policy and corresponding set of procedures is to set down the principles that govern responsible investing practices at the university, while recognizing and respecting the roles of the diverse stakeholders that make up the university community. 

An ad hoc committee of the Board has developed the draft of the revised policy and members of the Queen’s community are encouraged to provide feedback to help inform the revisions.

“As we saw during the recent discussion on divestment, there are many factors and viewpoints to consider when looking at our responsible investing policy and procedures,” says Don Raymond, Chair of the Board of Trustees and former chair of the Board’s Investment Committee. “We want to hear from Queen’s community members and ensure that their feedback is incorporated into the policy process.”

Draft procedures have also been proposed that provide a mechanism for the university to engage with its external investment managers on environmental, social, and governance factors, and that outline criteria for consideration when a special request is received from the university community.

“The proposed policy continues to provide an avenue for members of the Queen’s community to make special requests, such as the one that occasioned the recent consideration of divestment from fossil fuels by the Principal’s Advisory Committee, within the context of the university’s fiduciary responsibility,” says Mr. Raymond. “It also recognizes that the university can make an impact through several means not limited to divestment, including shareholder engagement activities and through its core mission as an educational and research institution.” 

The draft policy has been posted to the University Secretariat’s website. Comments can be sent to policies@queensu.ca. The deadline for submission is Jan. 20.  

 

Preventing a cyber attack

Cyber Security Awareness Month highlights need for web vigilance. 

October is Cyber Security Awareness Month, and Information Technology Services (ITS) is committed to ensuring Queen’s community members have the knowledge and tools they need to be vigilant online.

“IT security at Queen’s is everyone’s responsibility,” says Bo Wandschneider, Chief Information Officer and Associate Vice-Principal (Information Technology Services). “The university has implemented several measures to help protect our users from malicious attacks; however, everyone needs to remain vigilant against such attacks.”

Most cyber security threats are delivered to victims by email, through websites, or by exploiting a vulnerability in a computer’s software or hardware.

By following five guidelines, individuals can help reduce the risk of cyber threats:

  • Keep your operating system, applications, and anti-virus software up-to-date with the latest patches.
  • Run routine anti-virus scans and promptly remove viruses and infected files.
  • Be careful about what you are clicking on. Don’t open unexpected emails, attachments, or web links.
  • Encrypt computers and devices that contain, or may contain, sensitive data. 
  • Back up your files regularly in case they need to be recovered from an earlier version.  Saving your files on OneDrive or in your Windows File Service drive ensures your files are protected if your computer is affected. Store your files on one of Queen’s University’s secure file storage services.

“If you suspect that your computer may be infected with ransomware or any other type of malware, please contact the IT Support Centre immediately,” says Denise Ernst, Queen’s University Information Security Officer. “We  also encourage members of the Queen’s community to complete the Information Security Awareness Training course, and familiarize themselves with the security resources available to them.”

To learn more on how to protect yourself from becoming a victim of a cyberattack, and putting your identity and the university data at risk, visit the ITS website

A game-changing investment in innovation

Investment to support creation of Innovation and Wellness Centre, biomedical research facility renovations.

  • Member of Parliament Mark Gerretsen announces that Queen's will receive $31 million from the Government of Canada's Post-Secondary Institutions Strategic Infrastructure Fund on October 11, 2016. (Photo Credit: Bernard Clark)
    Member of Parliament Mark Gerretsen announces that Queen's will receive $31 million from the Government of Canada's Post-Secondary Institutions Strategic Infrastructure Fund on October 11, 2016. (Photo Credit: Bernard Clark)
  • Member of Provincial Parliament Sophie Kiwala announces that Queen's will receive to support two on-campus infrastructure projects, on October 11, 2016. (Photo Credit: Bernard Clark)
    Member of Provincial Parliament Sophie Kiwala announces that Queen's will receive to support two on-campus infrastructure projects, on October 11, 2016. (Photo Credit: Bernard Clark)
  • Principal Daniel Woolf discusses how the SIF-supported projects will improve the campus learning experience for Queen's students. October 11, 2016 (Photo Credit: Bernard Clark)
    Principal Daniel Woolf discusses how the SIF-supported projects will improve the campus learning experience for Queen's students. October 11, 2016 (Photo Credit: Bernard Clark)
  • Kimberly Woodhouse, Dean of the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Sciences, describes the new learning, innovation and research facilities that will be featured in the Innovation and Wellness Centre. October 11, 2016 (Photo Credit: Bernard Clark)
    Kimberly Woodhouse, Dean of the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Sciences, describes the new learning, innovation and research facilities that will be featured in the Innovation and Wellness Centre. October 11, 2016 (Photo Credit: Bernard Clark)
  • Rector Cam Yung discusses how students will benefit from the program offerings in the new Innovation and Wellness Centre. October 11, 2016 (Photo Credit: Bernard Clark)
    Rector Cam Yung discusses how students will benefit from the program offerings in the new Innovation and Wellness Centre. October 11, 2016 (Photo Credit: Bernard Clark)
  • Principal Woolf and Provost Benoit-Antoine Bacon tour the site of the Innovation and Wellness Centre. The new facility will be built on the location of the former Physical Education Centre - maintaining a number of elements of the old building's facade. October 11, 2016. (Photo Credit: Bernard Clark)
    Principal Woolf and Provost Benoit-Antoine Bacon tour the site of the Innovation and Wellness Centre. The new facility will be built on the location of the former Physical Education Centre - maintaining a number of elements of the old building's facade. October 11, 2016. (Photo Credit: Bernard Clark)
  • (From L-R) Rector Cam Yung, Dean Woodhouse, Principal Woolf, Provost Bacon and Mr. Gerretsen tour the Innovation and Wellness Centre site. October 11, 2016 (Photo Credit: Bernard Clark)
    (From L-R) Rector Cam Yung, Dean Woodhouse, Principal Woolf, Provost Bacon and Mr. Gerretsen tour the Innovation and Wellness Centre site. October 11, 2016 (Photo Credit: Bernard Clark)
  • (From L-R) Mr. Gerretsen, Principal Woolf, Rector Yung, Caroline Davis (Vice-Principal (Facilities, Properties, and Sustainability), Dean Woodhouse, Ms. Kiwala and Provost Bacon at the Strategic Infrastructure Fund announcement in Beanish-Munro Hall on October 11, 2016. (Photo Credit: Bernard Clark)
    (From L-R) Mr. Gerretsen, Principal Woolf, Rector Yung, Caroline Davis (Vice-Principal (Facilities, Properties, and Sustainability), Dean Woodhouse, Ms. Kiwala and Provost Bacon at the Strategic Infrastructure Fund announcement in Beanish-Munro Hall on October 11, 2016. (Photo Credit: Bernard Clark)

On Oct. 11, Queen’s announced that it had received a $31 million investment from the Government of Canada, under the Post-Secondary Institutions Strategic Investment Fund (SIF). The investment, in addition to a $4.9 million investment from the Government of Ontario and the contributions of a number of benefactors, will support two capital projects on campus– the creation of the Queen’s Innovation and Wellness Centre and a revitalization of on-campus biomedical research facilities.

[Innovation and Wellness Centre]
Architect's rendering of the Innovation and Wellness Centre, as seen from Union St. and Division St.

“We are incredibly grateful to the federal and provincial governments, as well as the countless generous donors who have made this investment in the future of Queen’s,” says Daniel Woolf, Principal and Vice-Chancellor. “The projects their investments support will enhance innovation programming at Queen’s and strengthen the university’s position in world-leading research. We look forward to continued future partnership with the government in strengthening innovation, research and economic development in Kingston and Canada as a whole.”

The Innovation and Wellness Centre, located on the site of the former Physical Education Centre, will feature expanded engineering facilities, makerspaces and experiential learning spaces funded by the SIF investment. The centre will be home to an Innovation Hub – centered around the successful Queen’s Innovation Connector – and state-of-the-art interdisciplinary laboratories. These facilities will increase opportunities for research, student design and learning, while also strengthening the university’s position in world-leading research. 

[Collaborative Learning Spaces]
The Innovation and Wellness Centre will bring collaborative and experiential learning spaces, state-of-the-art laboratories and mental health and wellness services together in one convenient location at the heart of campus.

The innovation and engineering facilities will be co-located with space for Student Wellness Services and the Chaplaincy. The wellness centre, funded entirely by philanthropic gifts, will also feature athletic and recreation facilities, the Queen’s University International Centre, and a new Exam Centre. The co-location of innovation and wellness services, a recommendation of the Principal’s Commission on Mental Health, will blend academic, recreational and other student life activities, and will emphasize to our students the important relationships that connect mental health, physical well-being and academic success. The project will also provide both a short-term and long-term economic stimulus to the Kingston community – through construction jobs and ongoing research and innovation, respectively.

“Today's investment from the Strategic Investment Fund is evidence of the Government's commitment to excellence in research, and understanding that we need to support our students, both in and out of the classroom,” says Mark Gerretsen, MP for Kingston and the Islands. “By investing in our educational facilities, universities and colleges across the country can foster the development of skilled and successful workers, who will help Canadian companies compete and grow in a global market.”

The SIF investment will also allow for the revitalization of campus biomedical research facilities that support research by a number of top-level research groups at Queen’s. The investment will strengthen Queen’s and Canada’s position in world-leading biomedical research – providing Queen’s researchers with the facilities necessary to expand their translational research in areas such as neurological, cardiovascular and cancer research.

“Improving post-secondary facilities is part of our government’s plan to build Ontario up, grow our economy and create jobs, so I’m incredibly pleased that we are able to work cooperatively with Queen’s University and our Federal counterparts,” says Sophie Kiwala, MPP for Kingston and the Islands. “Through this investment, we foster excellence, build our capacity to train the highly-skilled workforce of tomorrow, and to create knowledge and insights that will fuel discovery.”

“This is truly a game changing addition for the faculty and the university as a whole."  - Michael Norris (Sc’75), volunteer chair of the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Sciences fundraising campaign.

Nearly $37 million was donated by Faculty of Engineering and Applied Sciences alumni to support the innovation component of the revitalization project. Michael Norris (Sc’75), the volunteer chair of the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Sciences fundraising campaign said donors were inspired by the vision put forth by Dean Kim Woodhouse to promote entrepreneurialism within the faculty, and build on Queen’s standing as the premier engineering program in Canada.

“This is truly a game changing addition for the faculty and the university as a whole,” says Mr. Norris. “This campaign focused on reconnecting our alumni with the faculty and inspiring them with the vision put forth by Dean Woodhouse. This was a grassroots program that will hopefully have impact on the Queen’s community for generations to come.”

Kimberly Woodhouse, Dean of the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, says the new facility will play a vital role in the lives of students and the university as a whole.

“This generous funding from two levels of government, combined with the passionate support of dedicated Engineering alumni like Mike Norris, helps the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science remain a leader in engineering education and research,” says Dean Woodhouse.

The total cost of the two projects is approximately $119 million. In addition to the government funding announced today, Queen’s is contributing nearly $45.8 million towards the projects. Construction on the Innovation and Wellness Centre began in September and is expected to be completed in spring 2018. More information will be made available on the Queen’s Gazette website as the project progresses.

 

Learn more about employee benefits plan

Staff and faculty are encouraged to attend an education session to learn more about their employee benefits plan. The sessions are part of a comprehensive review of the Queen’s Employee Benefits Plan announced this past May.

Presented by Human Resources, the 90-minute sessions will take place over several weeks from Oct. 19 to Nov. 1. The content for the education sessions was developed in partnership with the Multi-Employee Group Employee Benefits Committee, which is comprised of participants from university employee groups, and the university’s benefits consultant, Mercer.

Employee Benefits Plan Education Sessions
* Wednesday, Oct. 19, 9:30-11 am, Jeffery Hall Room 126
* Thursday, Oct. 20, Noon-1:30 pm, Haynes Hall
* Tuesday, Oct. 25, 9:30-11 am, Kinesiology Building Room 101
* Tuesday, Oct. 25, 4-5:30 pm, Ellis Hall Room 327
* Tuesday, Nov. 1, Noon-1:30 pm, Jeffery Hall Room 127
* Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2:30-4 pm, Jeffery Hall Room 127

Following the education sessions, a confidential survey will be emailed in November to employees who are eligible to receive benefits. The survey will also be available in paper form for those who do not have access to a computer at work.

“I would encourage all faculty and staff to attend one of the sessions. Not only is it a great way to get a better understanding of the benefits plan, but it will help staff and faculty be better informed when it comes time to complete the survey,” says Dan Bradshaw, Interim Associate Vice-Principal (Human Resources). 

At each session, participants will receive an overview of Queen’s insured benefits plan for active members, including plan details and how they compare to the market. The sessions will also cover group insurance fundamentals, consumer tips, and broader trends in benefits.

Registration for the sessions is not mandatory; however, it is appreciated in order to ensure that all attendees can be accommodated. To register for an employee session, visit the Learning Catalogue

For more information, please email Diane Pointer diane.pointer@queensu.ca or call ext. 74173. Questions about the project can be sent to benefits.project@queensu.ca

Queen’s releases 2015-16 financial statements

University committed to supporting academic mission despite financial challenges. 

The university’s draft financial statements for 2015-16 are now available online, and will go before the Board of Trustees for approval at the Board’s Sept. 30 meeting.

The statements, which outline the university’s consolidated financial results for the fiscal year ending April 30, 2016, report a surplus of revenues over expenses of $39.5 million, even as the university continues to face a number of financial challenges.The surplus represents 4.5 per cent of the university’s total expenses.

“The university is committed to achieving long-term financial sustainability and maintaining our position as the quintessential balanced academy,” says Vice-Principal (Finance and Administration) Caroline Davis. “The operating fund surplus will provide important flexibility for future strategic priorities and a reserve for future pension payments. In addition, surpluses accrued by the faculties have been set aside in departmental reserves in support of academic priorities.”

The primary reasons for the surplus are actuarially defined pension expenses lower than pension contributions, significant utility savings, and an increase in tuition revenue.

Despite the surplus, the university continues to face a number of financial challenges, including low interest rates, an unsustainable pension plan with a $285-million solvency deficit, a $253-million deferred maintenance backlog, and reliance on government controlled grant support and tuition, all of which continue to be a part of the financial landscape.

“As has been the case in previous years, a significant portion of our surplus is non-cash and therefore not available for operations. We cannot count on continued surpluses in the years to come, and must prudently manage our reserves to help address our financial challenges,” says Vice-Principal Davis.

In May 2016, the Board of Trustees approved the 2016-17 operating budget, which is balanced after a $16.4 million drawdown of reserves.

2015-16 financial statements 

Work continues on employee benefits review

Learn more about your employee benefits plan at one of a series of education sessions hosted by Human Resources.

The 90-minute sessions, which will take place over several weeks beginning Wednesday, Oct. 19, are part of a comprehensive review of the university’s employee benefits plan announced last May.

These sessions will take staff and faculty through an overview of the Queen’s benefits plan, including plan details and how they compare to the market. The sessions will also cover group insurance fundamentals, consumer tips, and broader trends in benefits.

Dates and further information on how you can register for one of these sessions will be announced early in October. 

For more information, please contact Diane Pointer, Director, Total Compensation, diane.pointer@queensu.ca, ext. 74173. Those with questions about the project may submit them to benefits.project@queensu.ca

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