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Exploring career options

  • Will Cunningham, ED'16, of Trinity College School, hugs Elspeth Morgan, Career and Recruitment Advisor for the Faculty of Education, at the Options Career Fair.
    Will Cunningham, ED'16, of Trinity College School, hugs Elspeth Morgan, Career and Recruitment Advisor for the Faculty of Education, at the Options Career Fair.
  • Teacher candidates were able to meet recruiters from 52 organizations at the Options Career Fair hosted by the Faculty of Education on Tuesday, Jan. 10.
    Teacher candidates were able to meet recruiters from 52 organizations at the Options Career Fair hosted by the Faculty of Education on Tuesday, Jan. 10.
  • A teacher candidate speaks with a recruiter from one of the 52 organizations that took part in the Options Career Fair on Tuesday, Jan. 10.
    A teacher candidate speaks with a recruiter from one of the 52 organizations that took part in the Options Career Fair on Tuesday, Jan. 10.

Teacher candidates were able to make some valuable connections for the future at the Options Career Fair, held Tuesday at Duncan McArthur Hall.

The annual event brings together potential employers such as school boards, schools and camps as well as several international organizations.

Teacher candidates were able to gather information, meet one on one with a variety of organizations and get some career support from Queen’s partners.

This year’s event drew 52 organizations, up from an average of 40, a potentially positive sign for the job market.

“As a career advisor and as an employment advisor, it really heartens me that there is this many organizations coming and wanting to recruit and hire our graduates, which means something because it has been such a tight job market,” says Elspeth Morgan, Career and Recruitment Advisor for the Faculty of Education. “But now I say to them, ‘Look, we have all these people here, they aren’t here because they don’t want to hire graduates.’”

One such graduate is Will Cunningham, a faculty intern at Trinity College School in Port Hope, who returned to the Queen’s with the goal of helping teacher candidates make the connection that he did at last year’s event.

“At this time last year I had no idea what I was going to do. It was because of this Options Career Fair that I made contact with TCS,” he says. Afterwards he applied and was able to land his first teaching job. “The other reason I came back is that the Education Career Services department at Queen’s is so fantastic.”

Among the organizations in attendance was the Toronto District School Board (TDSB), Canada’s biggest school board. Sam Iskandar, principal of Silverthorn Secondary School and Reika Fuentes, Ed’94, vice-principal of Bloor Collegiate, were busy answering a number of questions from teacher candidates about what the TDSB is looking for.

“A number of people have asked ‘What are you looking for?’ and honestly we are looking for people who connect with kids, people who love what they do,” Mr. Iskandar says. “They ask us should I take anything in particular and we tell them take any subject that they enjoy teaching. You don’t want to be teaching something you don’t enjoy. When you do something you enjoy the kids love it, you’re very effective and the kids benefit huge.”

The Faculty of Education is hosting the annual Teaching Overseas Recruiting Fair (TORF) Jan. 27-29. More information is available online.

Ramping up accessibility

[Duncan McArthur Hall ramp]
A new concrete ramp with a 3.6 per cent slope now leads to the front entrance of Duncan McArthur Hall. The ramp provides ease of use for all persons, including people who require the use of an assistive mobility aid.

The university officially unveiled a number of accessibility improvements at Duncan McArthur Hall during a ribbon-cutting ceremony on Oct. 5.

[Jill Scott and Dave Stewart]
Jill Scott, Vice-Provost (Teaching and Learning), and Dave Stewart, a volunteer who attended the event on behalf of Kingston and the Islands MP Mark Gerretsen, cut the ribbon to mark the completion of the accessibility upgrades at Duncan McArthur Hall. The project received support from the Enabling Accessibility Fund, which is administered by Employment and Social Development Canada.

“Queen’s is committed to improving our buildings and grounds, in order to ensure the full participation of persons with disabilities,” says Teri Shearer, Queen’s Deputy Provost. “I would like to thank the Government of Canada for its support of these upgrades, which will benefit not only students, staff, and faculty, but the broader public who access Duncan McArthur Hall for various community events, performances, and activities.”

The project was made possible with funds from Queen’s and the Enabling Accessibility Fund, which is administered by Employment and Social Development Canada. 

This past summer, Queen’s undertook a number of upgrades to the exterior of Duncan McArthur Hall, which houses Queen’s Faculty of Education. The building includes an auditorium and gymnasium that the community can book for performances and events. The improvements include: 

•    A new concrete accessible ramp leading to the building’s front entrance.
•    Two new accessible picnic table platforms.
•    Redesign of the parking ticket machine dispenser to remove barriers.
•    The installation of several curb cuts that allow persons with disabilities to cross the street in a safe and barrier-free manner.

“It is not uncommon these days to see people are often more disabled by the society they live in than their disability itself. Disabilities exist not because of a person’s body and diagnosis, but because their broader environments are not accessible. The ability to access education, both physically and mentally, is not only an issue of basic human rights, but also one of basic humanity,” says Mark Gerretsen, Member of Parliament for Kingston and the Islands. “This new, inclusive environment will allow people of different physical abilities to share space and activities, and ultimately make this environment accessible to all.”

David Grightmire, a community representative who sits on the Queen’s Built Environment Working Group, speaks during the event on Oct. 5.

The improvements are part of Queen's ongoing efforts to enhance accessibility on campus. Queen’s is currently conducting an accessibility audit of the university’s built environment. The information gathered during the audit will help Queen’s identify and remove further barriers across campus.

“The successful implementation of these outdoor accessibility features has not only removed barriers, but has greatly improved the accessible journey sequence to the building and grounds,” says Yvonne Holland, Director, Queen’s Campus Planning and Development. 

“In all of our programs, we value and teach accessibility and inclusivity for all learners,” adds Rebecca Luce-Kapler, Dean, Queen’s Faculty of Education. “We feel it’s important that these values are reflected in the environment where our programs are delivered.”

 

 

5 things to ease the onQ transition

Queen’s new learning management system, onQ, is now fully implemented across campus. IT Services (ITS) and the Centre for Teaching and Learning (CTL) offer numerous supports and encourage instructors to take advantage of the drop-in sessions, workshops, and mobile help unit.

Selina Idlas, onQ Educational Support in the CTL, Margaret Hickling, Solutions Specialist in ITS, and Jacey Carnegie, onQ Transition Lead in ITS, are members of the support team available to help faculty members adjust to the new learning management system.
  1. The new onQ Support website has been developed to support students, instructors, TAs, and support staff in their use of onQ. The site features step-by-step instructions, FAQs, and videos on creating and using onQ courses, as well as links to training workshops and various methods of support.
  1. 24/7 help is available: The university is running a pilot of the End User Support (EUS) feature. Help is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, by email, chat, or phone. The EUS is operated by staff familiar with all functionality within the D2L or Desire2Learn “Brightspace” platform on which onQ is built. Full details on the support website
  1. Daily drop-ins – now through Sept. 23: The daily drop-ins are held in B205, Mackintosh-Corry Hall (main floor, across from cafeteria) from 10-11 am. Staff are available to answer your onQ questions. These sessions provide you with one-on-one support.
  1. Weekly workshops: These 1.5-hour training sessions cover the basics of setting up a course in onQ and give you the necessary tools to get started in the system.
  1. The Mobile Unit in the Faculty of Arts and Science: This team of students is available to work one-on-one with Arts and Science instructors in their own offices to assist with various administrative tasks within their onQ courses. The students can help with tasks such as: formatting content, setting up the Grade Book, creating Discussions/Topics, uploading videos and files, creating Groups, posting News Items, and creating Rubrics. For more information on the new onQ Mobile Unit, visit the onQ Support website.

September is here and classes have started. Be sure to sign up for onQ Training or stop by a drop-in for help with your onQ course.

 

 

Reaching out to youth at-risk

Part three in a series on innovative approaches to teaching and learning.

When the final project in FOCI 291 –Teaching At-Risk Adolescents and Young Adults – was assigned, Sarah Oldenburger (Ed’16) saw an opportunity to use the project to make a difference for a cause near and dear to her – youth housing. Partnering with staff at RISE@one4nine, she worked with the youth residents to develop program and service offerings designed to help them build towards the next phases of their lives.

“I’m really interested in housing for youth,” Oldenburger says. “There’s only one youth shelter in Kingston and there’s not a lot of other places where youth can go if they’re in need. Youth housing is something I'm personally interested in so I wanted to spend some time in community-based housing so I could contribute to the well-being of youth in those spaces.”

Over the course of several months, she conducted a series of informal interviews with youth at RISE@one4nine. These interviews were used to gather input on programming and support systems that clients felt would be of most use in helping them transition to independent living. Oldenburger said that building rapport with the youth was essential in creating an environment of trust where they felt comfortable opening up about their needs.

While the class has concluded, Oldenburger says she intends to remain involved with RISE, in order to see the programs proposed through her project brought to completion.

“I feel a sense of duty to carry out these projects,” she explains. “I’ll be staying in Kingston and giving as much to this project and this organization as I can, given whatever time and resources I have available. It’s a really cool organization and there’s a great need.”

Each year, students in the Faculty of Education’s FOCI 291 course are tasked with designing community development projects aimed at providing support to students at-risk due to challenges outside of the classroom – such as physical or mental illness or family circumstances. The course comprises half of the Bachelor of Education At-Risk Adolescents and Young Adults concentration – one of a number of concentrations in the Bachelor of Education program, which allows interested candidates the opportunity to specialize in a particular aspect of teaching.

 

Celebrating National Aboriginal Day

Aboriginal Teacher Education Program members take part in National Aboriginal Day celebration.

  • Paul Carl, administrative assistant for the Aboriginal Teacher Education Program (ATEP), speaks during the National Aboriginal Day ceremony at Kingston's City Hall.
    Paul Carl, administrative assistant for the Aboriginal Teacher Education Program (ATEP), speaks during the National Aboriginal Day ceremony at Kingston's City Hall.
  • Laura Maracle of the Four Directions Aboriginal Student Centre and a member of the organizing committee for Kingston National Aboriginal Day ceremony, takes part in a performance.
    Laura Maracle of the Four Directions Aboriginal Student Centre and a member of the organizing committee for Kingston National Aboriginal Day ceremony, takes part in a performance.
  • Paul Carl, administrative assistant for the Aboriginal Teacher Education Program (ATEP), leads the smudging ceremony at the start of the National Aboriginal Day ceremony at Kingston's City Hall.
    Paul Carl, administrative assistant for the Aboriginal Teacher Education Program (ATEP), leads the smudging ceremony at the start of the National Aboriginal Day ceremony at Kingston's City Hall.
  • Aboriginal Student Success Strategist Laura Maracle, a member of the organizing committee, speaks during the Kingston National Aboriginal Day ceremony at City Hall.
    Aboriginal Student Success Strategist Laura Maracle, a member of the organizing committee, speaks during the Kingston National Aboriginal Day ceremony at City Hall.

As Kingstonians gathered today at City Hall for the annual National Aboriginal Day celebrations, members of the Faculty of Education encouraged all members of the Queen’s community to join and recognize the important contributions of Aboriginal peoples.

That same thread of learning through shared experience is interwoven throughout the Faculty of Education, where the Aboriginal Teacher Education Program (ATEP) offers a wide range of services to support Aboriginal teacher candidates, while also providing the opportunity for non-ATEP enrolled candidates, graduate students, faculty and staff to learn about Aboriginal practices, culture and education.

“I think one of the exciting things about the activities our faculty holds and attends is the increasing level of knowledge about Aboriginal culture our students – Aboriginal and allies alike – are able to gain as the year unfolds,” says Kate Freeman, the program manager for ATEP. “There’s a lot of peer learning that can go on and sharing that happens as well.”

Currently, all teacher candidates receive instruction in Native Studies and Aboriginal education. The faculty also works to infuse other curriculum areas with aspects of Indigenous education – to encourage students to think of Aboriginal education in a broader context and to seek out other opportunities to include Aboriginal content in their classrooms.

The ATEP office also hosts a weekly smudging ceremony and operates a sacred medicine garden. The ATEP resource centre is also made available for students who may need to smudge or speak with an Elder if they’re in distress, and it offers Aboriginal education resources to all students and faculty at the Faculty of Education. Throughout the academic year the program hosts events that support and educate about Aboriginal education, such as guest speakers, Q&A’s or campus events such as Orange Shirt Day in recognition of residential school survivors or a drum circle to mark the Truth and Reconciliation Commission report.

“Someone asked me one time why the celebration is held at City Hall, on the concrete in Springer Market Square. I said because we can,” says Paul Carl, Administrative Assistant at ATEP. “We can smudge, we can have our sacred fire there, we can celebrate and enjoy ourselves and that connection between the community us. For me it’s because we can.”

Launched in 1991, ATEP is one of the longest-running and most comprehensive programs of its kind in Ontario. The program aims to provide support for teacher candidates and to improve knowledge and understanding of issues in Aboriginal education. For more information on ATEP, please visit the website.

McNutt an 'inspiration' – in research, activism & spirit

Overcoming physical challenges, James McNutt receives second master’s degree, his fourth degree overall.

“The power of language,” James McNutt says, is the thread looping its way through all of his work.

To explain, he quotes English poet John Milton: “The mind is its own place, and in itself can make a heaven of hell, a hell of heaven.”

James McNutt (M.Ed.'16) celebrates after successfully defending his master's thesis this spring. Mr. McNutt has been active on campus regarding accessibility issues, and he won the Steve Cutway Accessibility Award this past year. (Supplied photo)

“I think he’s saying that just by thinking, you make it so. I would argue it’s beyond thinking – it’s writing, and putting it into language,” says Mr. McNutt (M.Ed.’16). “That’s what creates impressions and meaning.”

Creating impressions and meaning through the written word has been a big focus of the Queen’s scholar’s life. Mr. McNutt, who has cerebral palsy and has worked through significant physical challenges during his lifetime, successfully defended his second master’s thesis this spring. The Education degree delving into the curriculum of the Queen’s medical school between 1880 and 1910, is his third Queen’s degree, and his fourth degree overall (he has a master’s in history from the University of Toronto).

And not only is he intent on creating meaningful written works himself, but he’s always curious about what various different written materials contain and how they inform those reading them.

“I love the late 19th to early 20th century. It’s my favourite period, because they still have the old ideals but they are learning how to be modern,” says Mr. McNutt. “I love looking at the old publications and the way they used language. The Victorians really knew how to write a sentence.”

A novel approach to studying university history

For his most recent master’s, supervised by Theodore Christou (Education) and Jacalyn Duffin (History of Medicine), Mr. McNutt studied medical teaching at Queen’s by looking at the textbooks of the time. “I used the textbooks as a surrogate for curriculum, because from 1880-1910, there are no notes and syllabi to look at. I did look at a few diaries, but there are not many.”

It’s a novel approach, as far as he knows, to studying university life and teaching. “When looking at the history of a university, the focus is usually on the facilities and buildings, and the financials. There’s a little about the professors, but the histories usually don’t talk about what was taught. It’s hard to get at what was taught,” says Mr. McNutt.

Specifically, in this thesis, Mr. McNutt wanted to examine how science and gender played into the curriculum at that time. Queen’s had opened a women’s medical college in 1883 after disgruntled male students forced women out of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons, Kingston, an early incarnation of Queen's Faculty of Medicine. The women’s college closed in 1894 due to insufficient enrolment and women were not admitted again to Queen’s medical studies until 1943. Mr. McNutt, in his research, compared the textbooks of the women’s college with the ones used strictly by male students.

“The only tentative conclusion I was able to make was that the women’s textbooks, in general, were longer and more detailed than the men’s books,” says Mr. McNutt. “In my thesis, I speculate that the instructors may have wanted to place more emphasis on the textbooks, rather than in-class instruction. I was able to find a diary from a female student, who wrote that her instructor only provided 15 minutes of in-class lecture.”

On the science side, he looked at innovation and technological changes – the X-ray, in particular, and its limitations – at that time. He discussed his findings on uses of the X-ray at the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences in Calgary earlier this month.

“I was very successful with the science part, and not so much the gender question,” he explains. “For the gender part, I would need more eyewitness accounts of how they were taught. That was a challenge for me, because I had to let the literature tell me what it wanted to tell me, instead of looking for what I wanted.”

An inspiration to the Queen’s community

Milton’s quote about making a heaven of hell, and a hell of heaven, is undoubtedly a philosophy that permeates Mr. McNutt’s entire life.

“James is an inspiration to all of us – the entire Queen’s community of faculty, staff and students,” says Dr. Duffin. “Over the last two years, he has bravely contended with illness. The fact that he worked through that and got on with it to produce an excellent thesis – and one about the history of Queen’s at that – is an incredible achievement.”

Duncan McDowall, University Historian  and Adjunct Professor (History), sat on Mr. McNutt’s examination committee, and echoes Dr. Duffin’s comments.

“Mr. McNutt is an impressive person. He goes beyond all expectations. He writes very well, and produced a very good thesis,” says Dr. McDowall. “In addition, he has a tremendous spirit, and confronts any and every challenge head-on.”

In addition to his studies, Mr. McNutt has worked hard on accessibility issues on campus. This past year, he was awarded the Steve Cutway Accessibility Award for his “Accessibility Audit,” a project that used video to share and bring to light accessibility challenges on campus.

“I’ve been really grateful to be recognized. My hope now is that it motivates people to act and continue making change,” he says.

And what’s next for Mr. McNutt?

He is taking a break, especially after much preparation for the conference in Calgary. But, indeed, he is “shopping around for PhDs.”

Queen’s to adopt new academic tool

After extensive consultation and discussions among a variety of groups, Queen’s University has decided to acquire a campus-wide licence for Turnitin, an academic tool that will support student learning and faculty development.

“I am pleased that Queen’s is joining other Ontario institutions that have benefitted from Turnitin,” says Jill Scott, Vice-Provost (Teaching and Learning). “The software, available for the fall 2016 term, will provide numerous learning opportunities for both faculty and students.” While the tool is sometimes understood as plagiarism detection software, Dr. Scott says Queen’s will promote it as a formative and developmental opportunity. “Turnitin will help students gain a deeper understanding of academic citation practices while safeguarding academic integrity.”

“Turnitin will enable Queen’s to adopt an educational approach by encouraging students to check for potential issues before submitting their assignments,” says Peter Wolf, Associate Vice-Provost (Teaching and Learning). “In this way, students can learn about ways to ensure they are submitting original work. Over time, supports will be developed for faculty, graduate students and undergraduate students on using Turnitin as an educational tool.”

Representatives from the Office of the Vice-Provost (Teaching and Learning), IT Services and the Queen’s University Faculty Association evaluated the software and recommended its adoption across the university. Ten Ontario universities, including the University of Toronto, McMaster, Western and Ryerson, currently hold a licence for Turnitin. Smith School of Business and the School of Kinesiology, Queen’s Economics Department and the Department of Psychology have been using Turnitin under an opt-in arrangement.

“We saw the opportunity to take Turnitin from an opt-in service that only a few on campus were using to a full, campus-wide application. This is another way ITS is looking to improve and bolster the best experience possible for our Queen’s community,” says Bo Wandschneider, Chief Information Officer and Associate Vice-Principal (Information Technology Services).

Strengthening self-image

Part two in a series on innovative approaches to teaching and learning.

Each year, students in the Faculty of Education’s FOCI 291 course are tasked with designing community development projects aimed at providing support to students at-risk due to challenges outside of the classroom – such as physical or mental illness or family circumstances. For Jessica Longchamps (Ed’16), this project created an opportunity to address the issue of body image and self-esteem in students and young adults.

Jessica Longchamps (Ed’16), created a workshop to address the issue of body image and self-esteem in students and young adults as part of her Teaching At-risk Adolescents and Young Adults program focus course. (Supplied Photo)

“Body image is something I identify as being much like mental wellness – everyone has a body image, whether it is positive or negative depends on the person and their own experiences,” says Ms. Longchamps. “A lot of people think of body image as only being something we’re concerned about at a young age but it is something that affects us at any age.”

As part of this course, teacher candidates are tasked with developing programs to improve their students' success academically, behaviourally and socially by providing life skills training, extra-curricular activities or by filling gaps in existing school programs. The course comprises one half of the Faculty of Education’s At-Risk Adolescents and Young Adults concentration – one of a number of concentrations in the Bachelor of Education program which allows interested candidates the opportunity to specialize in a particular aspect of teaching.

For her project, Ms. Longchamps designed a workshop for teachers, fellow candidates and members of the public to learn more about how to recognize signs that a student may be facing body image, eating disorders or self-esteem challenges, as well as means to offer support and connect them with specialists. In addition, she developed a program which connects students who are at-risk of developing eating disorders or have self-esteem or body image issues with a local support group in her hometown of Ottawa.

Ms. Longchamps says the motivation behind the project was to assist those who struggle with self-image challenges. The general lack of information about body image disorders, as well as the lingering public perception that self-esteem and positive self-image are a “choice,” further motivated her to do more to educate the public.

“I’ve noticed, in my peers and family, that when people don’t take the time to address their body image concerns that they had from their adolescent years, it translates up with them,” explains Ms. Longchamps. “I think that, collectively, we are each other’s best weapons in terms of supporting one another and building each other up.”

A second workshop is planned for this summer in Kingston. Ms. Longchamps is open to the idea of continuing to expand the workshop series to a wider audience, should demand exist, but says the lessons she has learned from designing the program will stay with her into her own classroom.

“Obviously, it’s important to teach curriculum,” says Ms. Longchamps. “However, if our students are struggling with mental or physical wellness, then they’re not able to learn to the best of their abilities.”

Math conference returns to birthplace

As the Canadian Mathematics Educators Study Group (CMESG) marks its 40th annual conference it is returning to where it all began – Queen’s University.

The event is being co-chaired by Jamie Pyper (Education) and Peter Taylor (Mathematics and Statistics), one of the founding fathers of the group back in 1977.

Peter Taylor (Mathematics and Statistics) is the co-chair of the Canadian Mathematics Educators Study Group, along with Jamie Pyper (Education). (University Communications)

For Dr. Taylor it has been interesting to see how the conference has grown and changed over the years, with the original 30 attendees now over 150 from a diverse range of backgrounds, including graduate students. The conference is more interactive and discussion oriented, utilizing working groups rather than large lectures and presentations.

Dr. Taylor will lead the way in taking an alternative approach at the conference. He is giving one of the four plenary talks during the conference, but it will be anything but traditional. “Instead of giving a talk I’m going to try something more like dramatic storytelling, and I’m going to be getting a critical piece of help along the way,” he says. “That fits with what the conference is trying to do now – find a new way to move forward. Everyone talks about the curriculum of the 21st century. We need to do something different and to do that you need to try different things. So, it’s in that innovative sense that I’m doing this. That’s really important for me.”

The CMESG’s first conference was held at Queen’s in 1977 in response to a Science Council of Canada report that said there were fundamental problems with the way math was being taught in our schools. While teaching methods have changed in the four decades since, Dr. Taylor says that many of the problems continue today.

“It’s interesting that these problems, or updated versions of them, have become increasingly important. You can see it in the media about how kids are taught and what they are learning, are they getting the right skills. There’s more public awareness and energy in this debate than ever,” he says. “It’s even become somewhat urgent. We’ve got to get this right. The world is entering into a new kind of culture, and our kids have to be ready for it.”

“Innovation is key,” he says, “and education within the STEM disciplines plays a vital role. Recent studies show that early education in areas such as spatial reasoning and coding has a positive effect.”

“We are recognizing increasingly through research, and much of this is Canadian, early intervention of some of these mathematical ideas is critical,” Dr. Taylor says. “What you do with kids at the pre-school, kindergarten and Grade 1 stage, can make an enormous difference at Grade 6.”

The 40th CMESG starts Friday, June 3 and continue to Tuesday, June 7 with most events being held at the BioSciences Complex. More information can be found at cmesg.org.

Delegation from Guangdong visits Queen's

A delegation from Guangdong University of Foreign Studies (GDUFS), led by President Zhong Weihe, front, third from left, visited Queen’s University on Tuesday, to meet with their Queen’s counterparts. (University Communications)

A delegation from Guangdong University of Foreign Studies (GDUFS) visited Queen’s University on Tuesday, to meet with their Queen’s counterparts.

Queen's In the World

The delegation, headed by President Zhong Weihe, met with representatives of the Faculty of Education and the Faculty of Arts and Science to explore areas of cooperation between Queen’s and GDUFS, including research collaboration and student and faculty mobility.

Currently, the university, located in southern China, has a Memorandum of Understanding and Graduate Student Exchange Agreement with the Faculty of Education.

The delegation also toured Queen’s campus as well as the Isabel Bader Centre for the Performing Arts.

In photo, front from left: Cai Hong, Director of International Office, GDUFS; Hugh Horton, Associate Dean (International), Faculty of Arts and Science; Zhong Weihe, President, GDUFS; Rebecca Luce-Kapler, Dean, Faculty of Education; and Liying Cheng, Teaching English as a Second/Foreign Language, Faculty of Education. Middle row: Zhao Junfeng, Dean of School of Interpreting and Translation Studies; Zhiyao Zhang, Director, China Liaison Office; Barbara Yates, Associate Director, International, Office of the Associate Vice-Principal (International); Craig Walker, Director, Dan School of Drama and Music; Robin Cox, Director, School of English, Faculty of Education; and Jenny Corlett, Associate Director (International Initiatives), Faculty of Arts and Science. Back row: Wang Weiqiang, Associate Professor, School of English for International Business, GDUFS, and Visiting Scholar at Queen’s; Xie Wenxin, Director of Human Resources Division, GDUFS; Donato Santeramo, Head, Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures; and Don Klinger, Associate Dean Graduate Studies & Research, Faculty of Education.

Queen’s launched its Comprehensive International Plan in August 2015 to support its internationalization efforts. The plan’s goals include strengthening Queen’s international research engagement and creating more opportunities for student mobility through programs like academic exchange programs. The plan also aims to attract high-quality international students to Queen’s and to increase international educational opportunities on the Queen’s campus.

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