FAQ

Question

Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, French Baccalaureate, A-level, Cambridge Pre-U and CEGEP Transfer Credits

Answer

The Faculty of Arts and Science grants credit for some Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, French Baccalaureate, A-level, Cambridge Pre-U and CEGEP Transfer courses. A maximum of 18.0 units may be granted. For complete information, please contact Undergraduate Admission.

Question

Am I going to be allowed to return next year if I did not do well in my courses this year?

Answer

If your grade point average on the courses you have taken is less than 1.60, you will be placed on Academic Probation. In order to graduate with any degree, a student must have a minimum grade point average of 1.60, so Academic Probation acts as a warning to students that they must improve their overall performance in order to be eligible to graduate in the future.

Enough failed courses overall (or, failed course(s) while you are already on Academic Probation) could result in a requirement to withdraw.

A student could be automatically required to withdraw for one year (RTW1) if his ir her cumulative GPA is 0.70 or less (A course that has been dropped on SOLUS does not count as a failure or as a course attempt.)  After the year has lapsed. the student would be eligible to return to studies by completing a Return to Studies Form. Upon return, the student is on academic probation and must raise his or her GPA to 1.60. 

A student could also be required to withdraw for one year if he or she is currently on academic probation and fails to raise his or her GPA to 1.60.

A student could be required to withdraw for a minimum of three years if he or she was at any time required to withdraw for one year and fails to raise his or her GPA to at least 1.60. 

Learn more about RTW1 in the Academic Regulations Section of the Arts and Science Calendar.

An academic advisor in the Faculty of Arts and Science can help you with your academic plan if you have questions or concerns about Academic Probation or a Requirement to Withdraw and how these sanctions affect your path to the successful completion of your degree.

Question

Are correspondence courses counted the same as on-campus courses?

Answer

Queen's correspondence courses are counted the same as an on-campus course. Courses with the same number and title cover the same material whether they are offered on-campus or by correspondence, they have the same weight and impact on your transcript, and count the same towards your required credits for graduation.

For more information on correspondence or distance courses and a list of courses offered, please see the Continuing and Distance Studies Website.

Question

Are distance courses easier than on-campus courses?

Answer

Distance courses cover the same material as the on-campus versions of the same course. Some students may find that not having the structure of in-class lectures or tutorials is difficult to adapt to, while others may prefer the independent method of learning.

As with on-campus courses, you can expect to spend at least 15 hours per week studying and preparing assignments for a 12-week 3.0 unit or 24-week 6.0 unit distance course. There are no lectures to attend, although online courses may require you to participate in real-time online activities.

For further information on expected workload, please see the Continuing and Distance Studies website.

Question

Can I add a course if SOLUS says it's full?

Answer

You are unable to add a course on SOLUS if it is full.

Although a course is full right now students are still making changes so a space could open up. Our best advice to you is to keep trying.

Question

Can I come back to Queen's to take more courses after I've graduated?

Answer

Yes; any student who has graduated from Queen's with an undergraduate degree can choose to come back to Queen's to take more courses.

Most students who take courses after graduating are not intending to complete a second undergraduate degree, but would like to take additional courses either for interest, to increase their overall average, or to obtain some required courses for a desired post-graduate program or career. This is called registering as a post-degree student. Please contact the Student Services office if this is the option you would like to pursue.

You will need to check to make sure your program choice is academically viable and has capacity. 

Learn more about second degree programs at Queen's. 

Question

Can I do two degrees at the same time? Can I do a dual degree?

Answer

If you would like to pursue two different degree plans in the same Arts and Science degree, there are a few ways to do this. You may be able to do a medial plan in the two concentrations you are interested in. A medial is an honours-level plan that is slightly less intensive than a major, and it must be paired with another medial in a different area of study, allowing for a balanced and complementary honours degree with focus in two different subjects. Alternatively, you may be interested in combining a minor (a non-honours plan) or a major in either the Arts or the Sciences. For a list of possible plans, please see the Degree Programs at a Glance section of the Arts and Science Course Calendar.

You can pursue a second Arts and Science degree in a significantly different plan - note that completing two separate honours degrees requires a minimum of sixty (60) additional units, to an overall total of 174 or 180 units, depending on the type of the two honours degrees you are interested in. In most cases, pursuing a second undergraduate degree will not make a significant enough difference in your eligibility for your future pursuits to warrant the extra two or three years of study it takes to achieve the second degree. For further information, please see the Second Degree section of the Arts and Science Course Calendar.

If you are interested in a Dual Degree, which allows students to complete degrees from two different Faculties or Schools concurrently at Queen’s University, please see the Dual Degree section of the Arts and Science Course Calendar.

Question

Can I drop a course after the deadline if I'm failing the course?

Answer

You are not able to drop a course from your transcript after the final drop deadline. However, if you have experienced documentable extenuating circumstances (circumstances beyond your control) which negatively affected your academic performance, you can submit an Appeal to the Associate Deans (Studies) to request that the course be dropped from your academic record. The decision to grant or deny this request is made by the Associate Deans (Studies). Please see the pages on Academic Appeals for more information.

Question

Can I get off probation this year if my grades are better?

Answer

If you have been placed on Academic Probation, you are required to raise your GPA to at least 1.60 the following year to be released from academic probation. At the end of the academic year, if you have failed to raise your GPA to 1.60, you could be required to withdraw for one year.

If you have been previously required to withdraw for one year and you fail to raise your GPA to 1.60, at the end of the academic year you could be required to withdraw for a minimum of three years.

Note that students will be reassessed to determine if they are eligible for release from Academic Probation only after they have completed a minimum of 18.0 credit units.

An academic advisor in the Faculty of Arts and Science can help you with your academic plan if you have questions or concerns about Academic Probation and how it affects your path to the successful completion of your degree.

Question

Can I have a failing grade removed from my transcript?

Answer

You are not able to drop a course from your transcript after the final drop deadline. However, if you have experienced documentable extenuating circumstances (circumstances beyond your control) which negatively affected your academic performance, you can submit an Appeal to the Associate Deans (Studies) to request that the course be dropped from your academic record. The decision to grant or deny this request is made by the Associate Deans (Studies). Please see the pages on Academic Appeals for more information.

Note that if the course(s) in question were completed more than 21 days before the submission of your appeal, you will first be required to appeal the 21-day deadline for appeal submission, explaining and documenting why you did not appeal within the deadlines and why you are electing to appeal now.

Question

Can I just drop a course anytime or do I have to do it by a particular date?

Answer

For each course, there are two drop deadlines of which you should be aware. The first deadline is the date the course must be dropped on SOLUS to receive a full refund of the course fee (this is called the Financial Drop deadline). The second deadline is the last date to be able to drop the course on SOLUS (this is the Academic Drop Deadline); once this deadline has passed, you will not be able to drop the course.

If you drop a course after the Financial deadline but before the Academic deadline, you will receive a partial refund; the earlier the date, the more the refund. Contact the Office of the University Registrar for details on fee refunds.

Please see the Academic Calendar Dates section of the Arts and Science Calendar for more information on these deadline dates.

Question

Can I still hand in work from a course I didn't finish last year?

Answer

Students with incomplete work may simply receive a final mark. Alternatively, they may receive a temporary final mark followed by IN provided that:

  • the student requests an incomplete grade (prior to granting such a request, the instructor may require a written appeal and/or medical certificate or other documentation that demonstrates extenuating circumstances)
  • the student has written the final examination in a course for which a final examination was required
  • the instructor agrees to accept the outstanding work.

Instructors shall indicate to the student, in writing, the last acceptable date for the receipt of late work.  See Information for Instructors, for more information.

IN grades are only valid for one term (for example, if an IN grade is assigned at the end of the Winter term, the student will have until the end of the Summer term to submit the outstanding work).

If the outstanding work is not submitted by the end of the subsequent term, the IN grade will lapse to an F (Failure) and will be included in the student's grade point average.

If there are extenuating circumstances that cause the student to need more time to submit the oustanding work, the student must submit an appeal to the Associate Dean Studies requesting an extension of the IN grade.

Question

Can I switch course sections if the one I'm in isn't working for me?

Answer

Yes, you can switch course sections as long as the one you want to switch into isn't full. Do not just start attending a new course section without first changing the section officially on SOLUS.

During the Open Enrolment period, you can make a course section change to a lecture, lab or tutorial on SOLUS. First, make sure there is room in the section you want to switch into then use the "swap" feature to make the change.  Do not drop the course then re-add it with the new section.  Changes on SOLUS are made in real-time so other students simultaneously adding the could result in you losing your spot altogether.

Note that some departments do not allow section changes in certain lectures and/or labs/tutorials without first obtaining permission from the department office (if this is the case, you willl need to request a permission number to make the swap on SOLUS).

If your only option appears to be to switch into a full section, you must go to the department that offers the course to request the Undergraduate Chair's permission. If he or she is willing to allow you to be enrolled in a section that is already full, you will be issued a permission number so you can add it on SOLUS.

Question

Can I take a Commerce or Engineering course?

Answer

Yes, students in the Faculty of Arts and Science can take certain Applied Science courses that are listed in the Arts and Science calendar, provided they meet any required prerequisites. Similarly, Arts and Science students can also take courses from the School of Business which are also noted in the Arts and Science Calendar. Courses that are not cross-listed in the Calendar are not available for registration or for credit transfer by Arts and Science Students.

Up to a maximum of 24.0 non-Arts and Science credit units can be taken over the course of an Arts and Science degree. In any given term or session, the majority of courses being taken by an Arts and Science student should be from the courses offered by the Faculty of Arts and Science. First-year students cannot take courses external to the Faculty of Arts and Science until the Winter term, and then only by special permission.

Question

Can I take a course at another university?

Answer

To take a course at another university and have the credit transferred back to your Queen's transcript, you must fill out a Letter of Permission application form [PDF], available for download at the Arts and Science website. If the course you wish to take is offered by a Canadian (domestic) institution, this application goes to the Student Services Office. If the course is offered by an international institution, you must fill out an International Letter of Permission application form [PDF] and submit it to the International Programs Office.

Your form must be completed and submitted along with printouts of the course descriptions (from the host institution's website) and the administrative fee for the application. You must be an Arts and Science student in good academic standing to be eligible to apply for a Letter of Permission. Guidelines for both the domestic and international procedures are available on the Faculty of Arts and Science webpage.

Please note that this form is only used to apply for the Letter of Permission and Queen's does not apply to the host university on your behalf. After you have received a Letter of Permission indicating that you may take the requested courses for credit transfer, you must apply directly to the host university for admission as a visiting student, using your Letter of Permission as your basis for admission. From that point forward, all dates, deadlines, fees and regulations pertaining to your registration in the course and your completion of the course are between you and the host university. When you complete the course, you must arrange for the host university to mail your official transcript directly to the office that issued you the Letter of Permission.

If this is the last course you need for graduation, be aware of the deadline date by which our office must receive your official transcript in order to confirm your eligibility to graduate. See the Sessional Dates section in the current Faculty of Arts and Science Calendar for more information.

Question

Can I take a course if I do not have the prerequisite?

Answer

In most instances a stated prerequisite for a course is mandatory. However, in some cases the Undergraduate Chair of the department offering the course may be willing to allow a student to take a course without the necessary prerequisite. If the Undergraduate Chair is willing to grant permission, he or she will issue you a permission number which you must enter in the appropriate box on SOLUS when adding the course.

Note that it is up to the instructor and Undergraduate Chair to make this decision, and they are under no obligation to allow a student to register if they feel the student does not have the adequate background to succeed in the course. They may be able to offer suggestions on what courses (at the university or even possibly at the high school level) should be taken to meet prerequisite requirements.

Question

Can I take a double major?

Answer

No. It is not possible to take more than one major in the same degree.

You may be able to do a medial degree in the two concentrations you are interested in. A medial is an honours-level concentration that is slightly less intensive than a major, and it must be paired with another medial in a different area of study, allowing for a balanced and complementary honours degree with concentrations in two different subjects. For a list of possible combinations, please see the Degree Programs at a Glance section of the Arts and Science Course Calendar.

You can pursue a second degree in a significantly different area of concentration - note that completing two separate honours degrees requires a minimum of sixty (60.0) additional units, to an overall total of 174.0 or 180.0 units, depending on the type of the two honours degrees you are interested in. In most cases, pursuing a second undergraduate degree will not make a significant enough difference in your eligibility for your future pursuits to warrant the extra two or three years of study it takes to achieve the second degree. For further information, please see the Second Degree section of the Arts and Science Course website.

You might be able to take a Dual Degree which allows students to complete degrees from two different Faculties or Schools concurrently at Queen’s University, subject to certain regulations. For further information, please see the Dual Degree section of the Arts and Science Course website.

Question

Can I take a major and a minor degree at the same time?

Answer

Yes, it is possible to take a major concentration and a minor or a general concentration at the same time, depending on the type of degree you are interested in. A minor is a non-honours concentration in the Arts, while a general is a non-honours concentration in the sciences.

See the Arts and Science Calendar's Degree Programs at a Glance for more information and for a list of possible combinations for your degree.

Question

Can I take a year off school?

Answer

Students may wish to take a year off school for a variety of reasons. There are no forms to fill out to do this. However, if you are in receipt of a scholarship or bursary, you may wish to speak to Student Awards to arrange a deferral of the funding until you return.

When you are ready to take classes again, please notify the Faculty of Arts and Science Office by submitting a Return to Studies Form [PDF].

Remember that you need to receive a Letter of Permission from the Faculty in order to take any courses at another post-secondary institution while you are away from Queen's. For more information download the application for a Letter of Permission [PDF] to take courses at a Canadian university or college. For international institutions, click here [PDF].

Question

Can I write my exam again if I was really sick when I wrote it and got a low grade?

Answer

The Faculty of Arts and Science does not allow rewrites of final exams.

Depending on the circumstances, particularly if the course is required for your program and you must obtain a higher mark in order to maintain your status in the program, you may either choose to repeat the course in a future academic session, or to look into the possibility of taking an equivalent transferrable credit as a visiting student on a Letter of Permission at another university. For more information on these options and to determine what the best course will be for you, speak with your department and with an academic advisor in the Faculty of Arts and Science Student Services Office.

If you did complete all of the course work including the final exam, and achieved a passing grade, but due to illness or other extenuating circumstances beyond your control, earned a substantially lower grade than might have been expected, you can choose to appeal in writing to the Associate Dean (Studies) for Credit standing (CR). A medical certificate or other documentation that demonstrates extenuating circumstances should be provided with the letter of appeal, as well as a letter from the instructor of the course supporting your request for CR standing. If the appeal is granted, the notation CR will be entered as the final grade in the course; no number grade will appear for the course. Students may appeal for credit standing no later than 21 days after being assigned a final grade in the course.

Please note that Credit standing is normally intended for final grades that are between 50 and 60 percent. and to recognize genuinely extenuating circumstances. If your average is quite high but you have received a grade in one course in the 60s or 70s, please be aware that it does not make your transcript look "better" to have the grade replaced with CR.

Question

Do AP credits count as required courses for my program?

Answer

For a list of the AP credits that are transferrable to your Queen's transcript and which will allow you to substitute the AP credit for an equivalent course unit, please consult the Admissions website. When you apply to Queen's, the Admission Office assesses the AP credits or other transferrable credits that you may have. If you have some credits that were not assessed at the time of admission, you must contact the Admission Office to arrange to have them retroactively assessed and transferred.

NOTE   that any courses transferred from another institution, whether taken prior or during studies at Queen's, are noted on the transcript as credits transferred. Any mark obtained in a transferred course is not included on the Queen's transcript and does not count into the grade point average (GPA), though the course will count towards degree and/or plan requirements.

Question

Do I get kicked out of Queen's for failing a course?

Answer

In all likelihood, no. There are very few cases in which a student would be required to withdraw for failing one course.

Progression reports are ran through the Faculty Office each spring once final grades are available and students' records are asessed to ensure that they are meeting satisfactory academic thresholds, enabling them to graduate.  Academic progress is assessed on students' overall GPA.  Students are only assessed if they have attempted at least 18.0 units since their last assessment.

A student could be automatically required to withdraw for one year (RTW1) if his ir her cumulative GPA is 0.70 or less (A course that has been dropped on SOLUS does not count as a failure or as a course attempt.)  After the year has lapsed, the student would be eligible to return to studies by completing a Return to Studies Form. Upon return, the student is on academic probation and must raise his or her GPA to 1.60. 

A student could also be required to withdraw for one year if he or she is currently on academic probation and fails to raise his or her GPA to 1.60.

A student could be required to withdraw for a minimum of three years if he or she was at any time required to withdraw for one year and fails to raise his or her GPA to at least 1.60. 

Learn more about RTW1 in the Academic Regulations Section of the Arts and Science Calendar.

Students admitted under the Non-Degree Student Regulation must successfully complete 6.0 units in order to be able to meet the conditions of their admission and continue their studies. Should 3.0 or 6.0 units be failed during this probationary standing, the student will be deemed ineligible to proceed.

Question

Do I have to major or minor in a specific subject or can I just get a general Arts or Science degree?

Answer

You must pick a plan. The Faculty of Arts and Science does not grant undeclared or unspecified degrees. In fact, if you are a returning student and do not have a valid plan listed on SOLUS, you will not be able to participate in course selection.

Note that all incoming first-year students do not have a concentration - if you are a new first-year student, you do not have to select a plan until you begin the registration process for your second year of study. After your second year, you do not have to declare a plan as you will have already selected your plan after your first year.

See the Building your Degree page for more information.

Question

Do I pay per course or is there a flat yearly fee?

Answer

There is no flat yearly fee for Arts and Science courses. Students pay for each course.

For more information on course fees and other supplementary fees, please consult the Registrar's Website

Question

Do my grades from my former school affect my Queen's average?

Answer

Grades from your previous university are considered for your admission to Queen’s and will determine if your courses transfer, but they are not included in your Queen’s GPA. Your “year” level will be based on the number of credits transferred and will not necessarily be the same number of credits that you completed at your previous university.

Question

Does Queen's Faculty of Arts and Science have co-ops?

Answer

The Faculty offers one co-operative education program in Biochemistry.   The Biochemistry Co-op normally takes 5 years to complete.  Students in other disciplines have opportunities for an 8 to 12-month internship after their third year.

Question

Does Queen's have a double major?

Answer

Arts and Science has a medial program that is analogous to a “double major” at many other post-secondary institutions.

Question

Does Queen's offer any co-op placement or internship programs?

Answer

For information on internships and co-op programs, please contact Career Services in Gordon Hall or have a look at their website.

Question

How can I change from a Science program to an Arts program or from an Arts Program to a Science Program?

Answer

This is possible; however, it would be best to discuss your options with an academic advisor. Each student's background and goals are different, and there may be restrictions on accessing certain courses or programs that you need to be aware of. Contact the Student Services Office to schedule an advising appointment, and seek advice from the department(s) you are interested in pursuing as well.

Question

How can I check if I am registered in the right courses for my degree?

Answer

To check if you are registered in the correct courses for your plan, first run an Academic Advisement Report (AAR) on SOLUS.  Your AAR will list what plan requirements you have fulfilled and what is still needed. You may also check your Degree Plan in the Arts and Science Calendar for details on courses required for your plan.

If you require further assistance, you can speak to a departmental advisor in your program/plan. They can help you determine which courses are necessary, and which optional courses might be best for you. You can also speak to an academic advisor in the Student Services Office for more general assistance with course and program planning.

Question

How can I find a tutor to help me with my course?

Answer

ASUS Peer Tutoring, formerly known as Mindfind, is a new and improved service that partners upper year tutors with those looking for a tutor in a variety of Arts and Science courses. Tutors are trained and paid $15/hour, making this both the highest paying undergraduate job on campus and the cheapest way to be privately tutored in Kingston. There are also bursaries available to students with financial need and first year students can sign up to tutor for local high school students. Interested in becoming a tutee or tutor? Visit www.queensASUS.com for applications or visit the ASUS Core (183 University). For more information, please contact the Directors at apt@asus.queensu.ca or the Academics Commissioner, at academics@asus.queensu.ca.

Question

How can I find out when my exam is?

Answer

Find out more about exams here.

Question

How can I get a form filled out for my Registered Education Savings Plan?

Answer

You can print a "Enrolment Verification" certificate directly from your SOLUS account. The Student Services Office has made arrangements with numerous institutions which administer educational savings plans to enable students to use this certificate as proof of enrolment.

If, for some reason, the institution you are dealing with will not accept this certificate, the Student Services Office at F200 Mac-Corry Hall may be able to complete the forms for you. An administrative fee for document preparation applies, and must be paid at the time the request is made to the Student Services Office to complete/prepare the necessary form.

For further information, please see the Student Awards website.

Question

How can I get a letter confirming that I am registered at Queen's?

Answer

You can print off a "Enrolment Verification " certificate from your SOLUS account. This indicates which program you are in, the year you are in, the length of your program, and your status (i.e. full time or part time.)

Question

How can I get a letter that will confirm that I'm graduating this year?

Answer

If you will be eligible to graduate upon successful completion of your current registered courses, the Student Services Office can provide a letter to you that will confirm this. There is an administrative fee, payable at the Student Services Office by debit or credit card at the time the request for the confirmation letter is made.

Question

How can I get an F removed from my transcript?

Answer

You are not able to drop a course from your transcript after the final drop deadline. However, if you have experienced documentable extenuating circumstances (circumstances beyond your control) which negatively affected your academic performance, you can submit an Appeal to the Associate Deans (Studies) to request that the course be dropped from your academic record. The decision to grant or deny this request is made by the Associate Deans (Studies). Please see Appeals for more information. If the appeal is granted, the course will appear on your official transcript as 'DR', meaning "dropped".

Note that if the course(s) in question were completed more than 21 days before the submission of your appeal, you will first be required to appeal the 21-day deadline for appeal submission, explaining and documenting why you did not appeal within the deadlines and why you are electing to appeal now.

Question

How can I pay for an appeal/LOP/letter?

Answer

You can pay for a Letter of Permission, an Appeal to the Associate Dean (Studies) [PDF], or any other administrative services offered by Student Services in several ways. At the Student Services office in F200 you can pay in person by debit or credit card. If you are out of town, you can pay on-line by visiting this page.

Question

How can I tell if there's still room in a course?

Answer

In SOLUS, under the 'Enrol" menu, when searching for courses check the box "Show Open Classes Only".  This will only show you classes with space still available.

Remember that during the Add/Drop period, changes to enrolment in a course happen in real time, so a spot may open up in a full course at any time if a registered student chooses to drop the course or change sections. Departments do not keep waiting lists for courses, so it is up to you to keep an eye on SOLUS for any spots that may come available.

Question

How do I apply to Honours?

Answer

With the implementation of the new grading system (May 1, 2011) students will no longer apply to honours.  For students to move on to 4th year in their Plans they must meet the pre-requisites for the 4th year courses.  (Prerequisites can be found in the academic calendar that will be posted in early May 2011).   Students are required to have a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 1.90 to graduate with an Honours degree.

Question

How do I book an appointment with an academic advisor?

Answer

Half-hour academic advising sessions are available to Arts and Science students daily from Monday to Friday, with appointment start times from 9:30-11:30 in the morning and 1:30-3:30 in the afternoon. Students have the option of coming in person or having a telephone appointment. In order to book an appointment, call the Student Services Office (613-533-2470) at 9:00 am to schedule for later the same day. Advisors' schedules are filled on a first-come-first-served basis, so please call early. Appointments can also be booked in person at Student Services, Mackintosh-Corry Hall.

Department advisors are also available for academic advising; consult your department(s) for information on how to schedule an appointment.

First-year students in the Faculty of Arts and Science are encouraged to begin by visiting a Peer Academic Support Service (PASS) Advisor in the Faculty Office. This drop-in advising service is available 9:00-4:00 on weekdays through the Fall/Winter academic session.

Question

How do I complete a distance course?

Answer

All distance courses are delivered online through the Moodle e-learning environment.  Since online courses are not tied to a particular classroom or location, distance students can complete them from almost anywhere in the world, including writing the final exam (if applicable) at one of our hundreds of exam centres across Canada and the world (only distance students may write exams outside of Kingston).

Check the course syllabus posted on the CDS website for information about your course such as instructor’s name and email, textbooks, course topics, evaluation and exam information. On the first day of class you will have access to your online course and you will receive communication from your instructor or Teaching Assistant (TA) by Queen’s email and through the course's Moodle page.

For further information, please see the Continuing and Distance Studies website.

Question

How do I drop a course after the deadline?

Answer

You are not able to drop a course using SOLUS after the academic drop deadline.

However, if you have been experiencing extenuating circumstances, beyond your control, that have adversely affected your performance in the course and/or your ability to drop the course within the established deadlines, you can choose to appeal to the Associate Deans (Studies) to request to have the course dropped. This formal request will be considered by the Associate Deans (Studies), who will notify you in writing if your appeal has been granted or denied. Remember that an appeal submitted is not the same as an appeal granted: unless it is medically or otherwise prohibitive, you should continue in the course to the best of your ability until you should hear from the Associate Deans (Deans) that the appeal has been successful and the course will be dropped for you. Even if the appeal has been granted, a DR will remain on your transcript.

If you have missed the drop deadline and choose to complete the course without attempting an appeal to the Associate Deans (Studies), you can seek assistance from the instructor, teaching assistants, or a tutor to do your absolute best in improving your performance. A Learning Strategist (available through the Learning Strategies office) may also be very helpful.

For more information visit the Faculty of Arts and Sciences' Academic Appeals Guidelines page.

Question

How do I fix a timetable conflict?

Answer

In planning your courses, you can attempt to resolve a timetable conflict by:

1. Adding your required (core to your plan) courses first

2. Switching the section of a lab, lecture or tutorial

3. Adding your elective courses last

4. Postponing some courses until the following year (if possible)

5. Being flexible!  You may have to wait until next year to take an elective course that you want if it doesn't fit in your schedule.

It is important not to jeopardize your registration in the required courses for your degree. Always switch your electives before dropping a required course. 

When you are selecting your courses for the upcoming Fall-Winter session during the Course Selection period in the Summer, check the times that your courses are offered on SOLUS to make sure that you do not choose courses that have inherent conflicts, i.e. that only are offered in time slots that overlap with one another with no possibility of resolution.

If you need to add an elective but you have difficulty finding one that fits your schedule, search for classes by the time parameters on SOLUS (for example, Tuesdays at 11:00 am) and SOLUS will retrieve a list of all courses offered during that time slot.

Question

How do I get a copy of my transcript?

Answer

To get an official copy of your transcript, you can request one through SOLUS or you can go in person to the Registrar's office in Gordon Hall. You can print an unofficial copy of your transcript from SOLUS at any time.

For further information, please see the Registrar's website.

Question

How do I get a credit transferred to my Queen's transcript from another university?

Answer

To take a course at another university and have the credit transferred back to your Queen's transcript, you must fill out a Letter of Permission application Form [PDF], available for download at the Arts and Science website. If the course you wish to take is offered by a Canadian (domestic) institution, this application goes to the Student Services Office. If the course is offered by an international institution, you must fill out an International Letter of Permission application Form [PDF] and submit it to the International Programs Office.

Your Form must be completed and submitted along with printouts of the course descriptions (from the host institution's website) and the administrative fee for the application. You must be an Arts and Science student in good academic standing to be eligible to apply for a Letter of Permission. Guidelines for both the domestic and international procedures are available on the Faculty of Arts and Science webpage.

Please note that this form is only used to apply for the Letter of Permission and Queen's does not apply to the host university on your behalf. After you have received a Letter of Permission indicating that you may take the requested courses for credit transfer, you must apply directly to the host university for admission as a visiting student, using your Letter of Permission as your basis for admission. From that point forward, all dates, deadlines, fees and regulations pertaining to your registration in the course and your completion of the course are between you and the host university. When you complete the course, you must arrange for the host university to mail your official transcript directly to the office that issued you the Letter of Permission.

If the course was taken BEFORE you became a Queen's student, you must speak to the Admissions office about the possibilty of retroactively transferring the credit. The Faculty of Arts and Science does not assess courses taken before admission to Queen's.

If this is the last course you need for graduation, be aware of the deadline date by which our office must receive your official transcript in order to confirm your eligibility to graduate. See the Sessional Dates section in the current Faculty of Arts and Science Calendar for more information.

Question

How do I get my money back from my student account if I got a refund for a course?

Answer

Please consult the Registrar's office for information on how to get your money refunded from your student account. Their office is located in Room 125 Gordon Hall, and their phone number is (613)533-2040.

Question

How do I know what courses I need to take for my program?

Answer

First check the Degree Plans section of the Arts and Science Calendar for details on courses required for your program. In the chapter devoted to your department, details should be included for any specific courses required in each year of study of your program. Also look at your department's website for current information and relevant program advice. Students may also run an academic advisement report on SOLUS. This report will list the course requirements that have already been fulfilled for your plan and what courses are still required.

If you require further assistance, you can speak to a departmental advisor in your program. They can help you determine which courses are necessary, and which optional courses might be best for you. You can also speak to an academic advisor in the Student Services Office for more general assistance with course and program planning.

Question

How do I know what program to take if I want to work as a - - - ?

Answer

Career Services, Room 300, Gordon Hall is an excellent resource for information on your future career options and how to reach your goal. Take the information you find there back to an academic advisor in your department or in the Student Services Office to help shape and define the degree and courses that will be best for you.

Question

How do I pay my tuition and when is it due?

Answer

Please consult the Registrar's Fee Information Page for details on how to pay your tuition and when it is due. If you need to contact the Office of the Univeristy Registrar for additional specific information, their office is located in Room 125 Gordon Hall, and their phone number is (613)533-2040.

Question

How do I register for a Summer course?

Answer

If you are currently a Queen's student, you can enroll in a Summer class through the SOLUS Student Centre. Be sure to enroll in your classes as soon as possible as both the on-campus and correspondence courses can fill up.

Just like the Fall/Winter session, the Summer term has deadline dates that you need to follow.  Because it is a shortened session, the deadlines come faster, so make sure you are aware of when the deadlines are to register for courses, to drop courses for a full refund, and also the final date to be able to drop courses. See the Continuing and Distance Studies webpage for more information on Spring/Summer courses, and for links to course syllabi.

Question

How do I submit an appeal?

Answer

You can submit an Appeal to the Associate Dean (Studies) if you are an Arts and Science student and have experienced extenuating circumstances which have affected your studies. You can submit your online appeal here.

As part of your appeal, you will also need to write a letter to the Associate Dean (Studies) explaining the extenuating circumstances as well as any relevant supporting documents. Supporting documents will be different for each situation, and may include a doctor's note, letter from a counselor or psychiatrist, or a letter from a department or instructor. As a general rule, make sure that anything you indicate in your letter as having been an extenuating circumstance that has negatively affected your studies has appropriate third-party documentation to substantiate it.

For some Appeals you may also require the permission of the Undergraduate Chair of the Department or the instructor of a course. If you are uncertain as to exactly what type of supporting documents you will require, please contact the Student Services office in F200 Mac-Corry Hall via this email, asc.appeals@queensu.ca.

For more detailed information on Appeals see the Student Guidelines. Also check out the Tips on Writing an Appeal Letter.

Question

How do I switch a course section or tutorial on SOLUS?

Answer

You can switch course sections (during the Add/Drop Period) and as long as the one you want to switch into isn't full. Do not just start attending a new course section without first changing the section officially on SOLUS.

Note that some departments do not allow section changes in certain lectures and/or labs/tutorials without first obtaining permission from the department office.

If your only option appears to be to switch into a full section, you must go to the department that offers the course to request the Undergraduate Chair's permission. If he or she is willing to sign an Academic Change Form [PDF] to allow you to be enrolled in a section that is already full, you can bring the completed form to the Faculty of Arts and Science Office for the section change to be entered.

Question

How do I transfer to another university?

Answer

For information on transferring to another university, you will need to contact the other university to see what their admission policy is for accepting upper-year students transferring from another institution.

Question

How important are failures under the new GPA system?

Answer

The new GPA grading system includes failures.  See GPA and Academic StandingAcademic Regulation 10 will evaluate academic standing using a single GPA threshold. 

Question

How is the Integrity of my transcript maintained?

Answer

Integrity of the academic record is paramount in all Queen’s transcripts.  Thus, when we switch to the new letter-based grading system, all your previous percent-based grades will remain unchanged.  All previous academic rulings will also remain.  A student will never be allowed to “switch” a letter for a percent grade, or vice versa.

Question

How many courses may I take during the Summer Term at Queen's?

Answer

Summer Term is organized into three sessions:  May-June; May-July and July-August.  The condensed session means that the workload in the Summer Term sessions may be more demanding.  Therefore, students are advised to take no more than two courses within the same session.

For further information, please see the Continuing and Distance Studies website.

Question

How much money do I get back if I drop a course?

Answer

A refund schedule is available for students who wish to drop a course. There is a published deadline by which a student has to drop a course to receive a full refund, and then after that date the refund drops by percentage increments until the very last day to drop the course. To view this schedule please visit the Registrar's website.

Question

How will I know what the decision is on an appeal I've submitted?

Answer

You will be contacted by e-mail to let you know the decision on your appeal. You may also be sent a letter by mail, so always ensure that your mailing address is current on SOLUS.

Depending on an appeal's complexity and on the volume of appeals being received in the office, it can take up to 21 days for the Associate Deans (Studies) to reach a decision.

Question

How will I know which credits from my old school transfer to Queen's?

Answer

Courses are assessed for transfer if the student accepts their offer of admission to Queen’s.  Transfer credits are listed on the student’s transcript posted on SOLUS.  A transfer credit (TR) designation is noted on the transcript for successfully transferred courses.

Courses where a student has received a grade of a C or better at another accredited post-secondary institution may be considered for transfer.   Transfer credit can be used as a prerequisite requirement; however, if the prerequisite requirement requires a mark higher than a C, the student will need to speak to the class instructor.  Transfer credits will not be included in the student’s grade point average but may be counted towards a degree program.

Question

How will my transcript be evaluated by a graduate school?

Answer

Generally, the people evaluating transcripts for entry into a graduate school are frontline faculty members, just like those you have encountered in your classes as an undergraduate.  They will be particularly interested in your performance in courses relevant to the discipline to which you are applying, probably far more than the overall GPA.  They will also be looking for trends in your academic performance:  a student who starts out weakly in first year but who ends up as an A student at the end of their undergraduate career may be viewed more favourably compared to a student with a more consistent, but ultimately less impressive, record.  The courses you choose will also be important:  what electives you choose to complement your discipline are critical to showing that you are intellectually mature and prepared to do graduate work.  Remember that your reference letters and any previous research experience are likely to be considered to be at least as important as your overall grades.  You should contact the appropriate admissions officer or the appropriate graduate school website if you have questions about your academic eligibility.

Question

How will my transcript be evaluated by a potential employer?

Answer

Interestingly enough, many employers don’t place a lot of importance on the grades you got in university.  Many of them will want a transcript merely to confirm your academic credentials.  They will often be much more interested in your skillsets, interpersonal skills, teamwork and previous job experience.

Question

How will my transcript be evaluated by a professional school (education, medical, law, etc.)

Answer

Professional schools all have different criteria for admission.  The transcript is one of them, but aptitude tests (MCAT, LSAT) and references are also important.  Some useful information on the evaluation of transcripts by professional schools in Ontario can be found at the links below:

Ontario Medical Schools (OSMAS)

Ontario Faculties of Education (TEAS)

Ontario Law Schools (OSLAS)

Ontario Rehabilitation Science Programs (ORPAS)

Question

How will my transcript be evaluated by a scholarship agency?

Answer

Certainly it is true that “A” students tend to get scholarships.  But it is important to remember that many external scholarship agencies use grades as just one criterion when assessing you for scholarships:  research experience, job experience, and evidence of communication, leadership and interpersonal skills are all important components, particularly for the most prestigious scholarships.  If applying for a major scholarship, you should carefully review the instructions from the scholarship agency, and if necessary contact them directly if you have questions.

Question

How will my transcript be evaluated externally?

Answer

Your Queen’s transcript is an important record of your academic achievements in university, but it is by no means the only indicator of your overall abilities:  building a good resume and a network of individuals who can act as references is also very important.

Having said this, it is important to remember that those evaluating your transcript are likely to be looking at a lot more than just your GPA. They are going to be far more interested in such things as: what courses did you take?  How long did you take to complete your degree?  How consistent is the student’s performance?  How applicable are the skillsets and knowledge you have acquired as an undergraduate to the position/award to which you are applying? 

Question

How will the change from percent to letter grades be explained on the transcript?

Answer

All Queen’s transcripts contain a legend.  While the Registrar’s office and the Senate Committee for Academic Progression (SCAP) are still developing the legend for the new transcript, they have assured us that it will contain a detailed explanation of both old and new grading systems and explain to the reader why some transcripts will contain both letter and percent grades.

It is also important to note that Queen’s University is by no means alone in changing its grading scheme.  Many major Canadian universities, such as the University of Alberta, have changed their grading scheme in the recent past.

Question

I have an exam conflict - what do I do?

Answer

The following scenarios are considered exam scheduling conflicts:

  • two exams at the same time
  • an exam at the same time as a religious observance
  • three exams in three consecutive exam slots (i.e. 2:00 pm, 7:00 pm, and 9:00 am).

In these cases, individual arrangements are made for each student. You must complete an application to the Exams Office for an accommodation for an official exam conflict and each term, there is a deadline by which this application must be completed. The only alternative is to speak to your instructor to see if they are willing to accommodate you and rearrange your exam.

For further information, please see the Registrar's page on exam conflicts

Question

I need to send my transcript to another university; when will the latest marks show up?

Answer

During the year, there are specific dates when marks are released and will appear on your transcript. Please consult the Registrar's website for this information.

Question

I took a course at my former school that I think should transfer but didn't. What do I do if I feel my credit(s) should have been assessed differently?

Answer

If equivalent credit was not awarded for a particular course, or you feel it should have been assessed differently, please contact Undergraduate Admission.

Question

I want to study Life Sciences; what would my first year be like?

Answer

The first year of study for students intending to concentrate in Life Sciences is a foundation year where students must complete introductory courses in Biology, Calculus, Chemistry, and Physics (and one elective).

Question

If I accidentally drop a course on SOLUS can I get it added again?

Answer

If the deadline has not passed, and there is still room in the course/section you need, you can re-add the course on SOLUS. If the deadline to add courses using SOLUS has passed, you will have to submit a formal Appeal to the Associate Deans (Studies) if you accidentally dropped a course and want it re-added. If the course is full, whether the deadline has passed or not, you will also need to obtain permission of the Undergraduate Chair of the department offering the course by obtaining a permission number. You will be able to add the course on SOLUS using the permission number issued to you.

Question

If I don't like the program I chose, can I change it later?

Answer

You have the option to request a change to your program during the Program Selection stage of the registration process, but note that not all departments accept upper-year transfer students. Depending on your year of study and the courses you have or haven't taken so far, you may need to take some additional courses or additional years of study if you make a significant change to your program.

Consult the Arts and Science Choosing or Changing your Plan webpages for more information, or speak to a departmental advisor in the program into which you wish to change. You may also wish to speak to an academic advisor in the Student Services Office about your options, how best to go about making the changes to your program and courses, whether a change of program will necessitate an extra year of study, etc. and you can also run a "What If" report on SOLUS.

Question

If I drop a course will my OSAP or scholarship be affected?

Answer

OSAP and other student financial assistance may be affected by changes in your course load, particularly if the change moves you from full-time status (24.0 units or more) to part-time status (0-21.0 units). In cases of extenuating circumstances that necessitate dropping one or more courses, you may be able to appeal to maintain your funding. Please contact Student Awards for more information.

For further information, please see the Student Awards website.

Question

If I drop down to a part time course load this year will I still be allowed to take a full time course load next year?

Answer

If you have been admitted to Queen's as a full-time student, you can choose to take a part-time course load (0-18.0 credit units) and then later return to full time studies at any time.

Reducing your course load may have other implications; if you are receiving OSAP, government funding or any type of a bursary or scholarship which may have a minimum course requirement, your funding may be adjusted or even fully rescinded. If you are receiving ANY type of funding for your studies, please check with the Student Awards office in Gordon Hall before dropping a course.

Also please be aware that some departments may be at capacity when you decide to return to full-time studies, so consult the department office for your program(s) of concentration to make sure they are aware that you are returning to full-time studies.

Question

If I fail a course will I be put on probation?

Answer

Students are placed on Academic Probation not because of failed courses, but rather if their grade point average on the courses they have taken is less than 1.60. In order to graduate with any degree, a student must have a minimum grade point average of 1.60, so Academic Probation acts as a warning to students that they must improve their overall performance in order to be eligible to graduate in the future.

Enough failed courses overall (or, failed course(s) while you are already on Academic Probation) could result in a requirement to withdraw.

An academic advisor in the Faculty of Arts and Science can help you with your academic plan if you have questions or concerns about Academic Probation and how it affects your path to the successful completion of your degree.

Question

If I get a zero in my course because of plagiarism, will it show up on my transcript?

Answer

Any changes to your final grade due to sanctions from a finding of plagiarism will show up on your transcript, including a final grade of zero. However, there will be no notation about the plagiarism on your transcript.

The only time a notation regarding a departure from academic integrity will be made on your transcript is if the sanction is a requirement to withdraw, and even under this circumstance the notation is only on the transcript until the sanction has been completed.

Question

If I retake a course, will it show up twice on my transcript or just the better grade?

Answer

Each passed course can count only once in the program for the degree; for example, if a student takes ENGL 100 two times and passes both attempts, it does not count as two credits towards the completion of your plan. When a course is retaken, if one or both attempts were passed, the passed attempt with the higher mark will count toward the plan requirements and towards your GPA.

If the first course attempt is failed and the second is passed, the passing grade will count toward the GPA only. This only applies if the courses have the exact same course code.

In all cases, all repeated course attempts, whether passed or failed, will continue to appear on the student's transcript with their corresponding grades.

For more information please see Academic Regulation 10.4.5 of the Faculty of Arts and Science Calendar.

Question

If I want to finish a degree I started a long time ago can I still do this? Will the courses I took then still count?

Answer

You can return to Queen's University to finish a degree you started here. If you have not been to another post-secondary institution all you have to do is fill out and submit a Return to Studies Form [PDF]. The courses you took previously at Queen's will still be counted, but if there have been significant changes to the degree structure and/or course offerings during your absence, you will need to discuss the completion of your degree with an academic advisor in the Faculty of Arts and Science Student Services Office, as well as with the Undergraduate Chair in your department. In addition, your record must be academically competitive and meet departmental requirements for proceeding in the concentration for the session in which you wish to return.

Question

If I want to study an area in the Arts, can I study a Science area too?

Answer

Yes, it is possible to study both Arts and Science subjects as part of a BA or BSC degree program. For example, a student admitted to a Science (BSCH) program may Major in Biology and Minor in Drama.  The same applies for a student admitted to an Arts (BAH) program, (s)he may Major in Drama and Minor in Biology.

Question

If I wasn't able to finish my course, is there any way that I can still get credit for it?

Answer

If you are unable to complete all the work for your course because of illness or other extenuating circumstances beyond your control, you must appeal in writing to the Office of the Associate Dean (Studies) for Aegrotat standing (AG). At least 60% of the work to be evaluated in the course (assignments, midterms, laboratories, final examination, as specified in the course outline) must have been completed. A medical certificate or other documentation that demonstrates extenuating circumstances should be provided with your letter of appeal, as well as a letter from the instructor of the course, confirming that you have completed at least 60% of the course work and supporting your request for AG standing in the class.

If the appeal is granted, the instructor involved will be asked to provide an adjusted final grade based solely on the work that was completed. (For example, if the course was evaluated based on four equally weighted assignments and you had completed 3 of them and received a B on each, your final grade would be noted on your transcript as B. Students may appeal for AG standing no later than 21 days after being assigned a final grade in the course.

Question

If I've taken a lot of electives in one subject, can I get a minor in that subject?

Answer

Depending on the courses you have taken, this may be a possibility. Consult the Degree Plan section of the Arts and Science Calendar to seek out the program descriptions for the minor you think you may be eligible for or run a "What If" report on SOLUS. You can request the addition of the minor to your major plan during the next Plan Change Request period. Note that you cannot have more than one minor or general concentration in the same program; e.g., you cannot have a major and two minors.

It will likely be very helpful to discuss this with an academic advisor by booking an appointment at the Student Services Office.

Question

Is there a limit to the amount of courses I can take per term and per year?

Answer

Full-time students in most Arts and Science programs take 30.0 units in the Fall-Winter academic year. In any Fall-Winter session, students may carry from 24.0 to 36.0 units to be considered full-time. Don't increase your course load to 33.0 or 36.0 units to try and "catch up" due to past failure, or if your past GPA is less than 1.6. First year students in most disciplines are strongly encouraged to NOT attempt 36.0 units.

A student must obtain written permission from the office of the Associate Dean (Studies) in order to take more than 36.0  units the Fall-Winter Session (or more than 18.0 units in any one term).

Part-time students may take a maximum of 18.0 units in the Fall-Winter academic year, not exceeding 9.0 units per term.

In the Spring-Summer session, a course load of 12.0 units should be considered as the equivalent of a full-time course load, because the shortened session means increased pace and intensity in the courses.

Question

Is there a minimum number of units I must complete through Queen's?

Answer

Yes, there is a minimum number of units you must complete within Arts and Science at Queen’s.

For a 3 year General Degree,

No more than 42.0 units in the Program and no more than the following number of units in the Plan may be transfer credits (grade of TR) from outside Queen’s University:
(i) For the General Arts (B.A.) Plans, 12.0 units
(ii) For the General Science or Computing (B.Sc. or B.Cmp.) Plans, 18.0 units
(iii) For the General Fine Art (B.F.A) Plan, 24.0 units
(iv) For the General Physical and Health Education (B.P.H.E.) Plan, 24.0 units

For a 4-year Honours Degree,

No more than 54.0 units in the Program (60.0 for the B.Mus. Program) and no more than the following number of units in the Plan(s) may be transfer credits (grade of TR) from outside Queen’s University:
(i) For Specialization Plans, one-half less 6.0 units of the total required for the Plan
(ii) For Major Plans, 24.0 units
(iii) For Medial Plans, 18.0 units
(iv) For Minor Plans, as per the corresponding General Plan requirements noted above in Academic Regulation 16.1.2 

Question

Is there any way I can write my exam on an earlier or later date?

Answer

To write an exam on a different date than the scheduled date, you must make arrangements with your instructor directly. It is up to the instructor whether or not they will allow you to change your exam time. Be prepared to show documentation for your extenuating circumstances, such as a doctor's note.

Note that travel plans that were pre-booked before the exam timetable was posted do NOT count as extenuating circumstances. Be sure to wait until you have confirmed your exam schedule before scheduling any travel plans or departure from Kingston.

For further information, please see the Registrar's page on exam conflicts.

Question

Should I write my exam/submit my assignment even though I've submitted an appeal to drop the course?

Answer

In general, it is best to continue in the course until you hear otherwise from the Associate Dean (Studies) in response to your appeal. Until they should make a decision to have the course(s) dropped from your transcript, you are still registered in them, with all the responsibilities and rights that that involves.

The exception to this is if it is medically or otherwise impossible or inadvisable for you to continue in your course(s). If this is the case, it will likely be affecting all of your courses and you should make sure that your appeal requests are appropriate to your circumstances. Make sure that you have the proper medical or other documentation needed to support your appeal.

An appeal, depending on the complexity, can take up to 21 days to process and for the Associate Dean (Studies) to reach a decision.

If you have additional questions or concerns about your situation, please contact the Student Services Office and schedule an appointment with an academic advisor.

Question

What about the old A, B, C grades?

Answer

Arts and Science transcripts today contain a percent grade and an associated letter grade of A (80%+), B (65% - 79%) or C (50 – 64%).  It should be noted that these letter grades are not used today for any academic purpose, nor will they in the future.  They bear no relationship to the new letter-based grading system.  In fact, they represent a holdover from a time when the Faculty “classed” degrees and have not been used for many years.

Question

What can I do if I got a letter saying that I have been Required to Withdraw?

Answer

If you have been notified that you have been Required to Withdraw for a minimum of One Year (RTW1) or a Requirement to Withdraw for a minimum of Three Years (RTW3), you have 21 days to submit an appeal to the Associate Deans (Studies) to request that this be waived. Note that any appeals must include a written letter from you, documenting your extenuating circumstances that negatively affected your academic performance. Your appeal must also include supporting documentation; anything you cite as being an extenuating circumstance, beyond your control, must be substantiated through documentation from a third party, such as a doctor's note, letter from a counsellor or psychiatrist, correspondence or letters from the instructor and/or the department, etc. Each situation is different and unique, and therefore there is no standard set of required documentation, but you must be able to substantiate any circumstances you describe in your letter as having a negative effect on your studies. Each appeal is considered individually on its own merit, and the Associate Deans (Studies) will notify you by letter if your appeal has been granted or denied, and how to proceed in either case.

If you have been away from your studies for three years or more following an RTW3 and now wish to return, you must also submit an appeal to the Associate Deans (Studies), indicating why you feel you are ready to return to your studies and detailing your personal academic plan for success. Such appeals should include documentation of what you have done during the time spent away from studies, and may include letters of support from employers, volunteer supervisors, etc.

If you have been away from your studies for one year following an RTW1, you do not need to appeal to return. You may automatically participate in the registration process along with all other returning students.

If you have questions about RTW1 or RTW3, or need assistance creating a realistic and functional academic plan, please contact the Student Services Office for an appointment with an Academic Advisor.

Question

What can I do if my appeal is denied and I think it shouldn't have been?

Answer

If your appeal was denied and you think it shouldn't have been, you have two potential options for continuing the process.

If you have additional information and/or documentation that was not submitted in your original appeal and which you feel would strengthen your appeal, you can submit a revised letter and new documentation as an amendment to your original appeal.

If you do not have additional documentation but feel that your appeal could be granted if is reconsidered, you can choose to appeal to the Board of Studies. Appeals must be received in the Faculty Office by the stated deadlines (within 21 calendar days after the decision of the Associate Dean (Studies)), and all materials in the previous appeal are forwarded to the Board. Note that you may only add an additional letter to the Board addressing the decision of the Office of Associate Dean (Studies), not any new information or documentation not already covered in the original appeal.

These processes do not cost an extra administrative fee.

For more information please see the Appeals on Matters Other than Those Related to Academic Integrity page.

Question

What do I do if my program choice has been rejected?

Answer

First-year students submit a first and second choice during the Degree Program Request period in the spring. Students are advised to list a less competitive concentration as their second choice.

If a student's first and second program choices are rejected, you must enter a new choice on the Late Program Request page on the Arts and Science website. This new request will go to the department(s) again, who will determine if they can accommodate your selection. If you have any questions about the direction that will be best for you, please contact the Student Services Office to book an appointment with an academic advisor.

Question

What does it mean if I received an investigation into a possible departure from academic integrity form from my instructor?

Answer

When an instructor sees evidence in your work that suggests that a departure from academic integrity may have taken place, it is the instructor’s responsibility to initiate an investigation into the situation.

Please visit the Arts and Science website for more information on Academic Integrity, including Academic Regulation 1 of the Arts and Science Calendar.

Question

What does it mean if I'm "required to withdraw?"

Answer

REQUIREMENT TO WITHDRAW FOR ONE YEAR

After the completion of a minimum of 18.0 units, a student who has not passed a majority of units attempted (including transferable units taken and failed in another university, Faculty or School before transfer to the Faculty of Arts and Science), or who has failed to meet probationary conditions, will be required to withdraw for a minimum of one year. During that period, the student will not be permitted to register in the Faculty. Students who have been required to withdraw for one year will not be allowed to transfer credits from another university for courses taken while required to withdraw.

If you have been notified that you have been Required to Withdraw for a minimum of One Year (RTW1), you have 21 days to submit an appeal to the Associate Deans (Studies) to request that this be waived. Note that any appeals must include a written letter from you, documenting your extenuating circumstances that negatively affected your academic performance. Your appeal must also include supporting documentation; anything you cite as being an extenuating circumstance, beyond your control, must be substantiated through documentation from a third party, such as a doctor's note, letter from a counsellor or psychiatrist, correspondence or letters from the instructor and/or the department, etc. Each situation is different and unique, and therefore there is no standard set of required documentation, but you must be able to substantiate any circumstances you describe in your letter as having a negative effect on your studies. Each appeal is considered individually on its own merit, and the Associate Deans (Studies) will notify you by letter if your appeal has been granted or denied, and how to proceed in either case.

If you have been away from your studies for one year following an RTW1, you do not need to appeal to return. You may automatically participate in the registration process along with all other returning students.

REQUIREMENT TO WITHDRAW FOR A MINIMUM OF THREE YEARS

Students who have either 1) accumulated failures on 36.0 or more units or 2) have not passed 90.0 units, including a minor concentration, with a 1.60 grade point average, in 132.0 attempts (including transferable courses taken and failed in another university, faculty or school before transfer to the Faculty of Arts and Science), will be required to withdraw for a minimum of three years. Students who have been required to withdraw for a minimum of three years will not be allowed to transfer credits from another university for courses taken while required to withdraw.

If you have been notified that you have been Required to Withdraw for a minimum of Three Years (RTW3), you have 21 days to submit an appeal to the Associate Deans (Studies) to request that this be waived. Note that any appeals must include a written letter from you, documenting your extenuating circumstances that negatively affected your academic performance. Your appeal must also include supporting documentation; anything you cite as being an extenuating circumstance, beyond your control, must be substantiated through documentation from a third party, such as a doctor's note, letter from a counsellor or psychiatrist, correspondence or letters from the instructor and/or the department, etc. Each situation is different and unique, and therefore there is no standard set of required documentation, but you must be able to substantiate any circumstances you describe in your letter as having a negative effect on your studies. Each appeal is considered individually on its own merit, and the Associate Deans (Studies) will notify you by letter if your appeal has been granted or denied, and how to proceed in either case.

If you are within 12.0 units of a degree with a 1.60 grade point average on courses passed, or have accumulated failures in 30.0 units or more in a single academic session, your case will be reviewed by the Associate Dean (Studies), who may impose a lesser penalty.

If you have been away from your studies for three years or more following an RTW3 and now wish to return, you must also submit an appeal to the Associate Deans (Studies), indicating why you feel you are ready to return to your studies and detailing your personal academic plan for success. Such appeals should include documentation of what you have done during the time spent away from studies, and may include letters of support from employers, volunteer supervisors, etc. All students who return to studies in the Faculty of Arts and Science after a period of absence of three years or more are subject to the degree program requirements in effect at the time of their return.

If you have questions about RTW1 or RTW3, or need assistance creating a realistic and functional academic plan, please contact the Student Services Office for an appointment with an Academic Advisor. See Academic Regulation 13 of the Arts and Science Calendar for more information.

Question

What does it mean when it says a certain course is an "exclusion?"

Answer

This means that the courses are similar enough in content that only one can be counted for credit towards a degree, even if one or both are taken as electives.

See the Definitions page in the Arts and Science Calendar for more information on academic terms.

Question

What form do I need to take a course at another university?

Answer

To take a course at another university and have the credit transferred back to your Queen's transcript, you must fill out a Letter of Permission application form [PDF], available for download at the Arts and Science website. If the course you wish to take is offered by a Canadian (domestic) institution, this application goes to the Student Services Office. If the course is offered by an international institution, you must fill out an International Letter of Permission application form [PDF] and submit it to the International Programs Office.

Your form must be completed and submitted along with printouts of the course descriptions (from the host institution's website) and the administrative fee for the application. You must be an Arts and Science student in good academic standing to be eligible to apply for a Letter of Permission. Guidelines for both the domestic and international procedures are available on the Faculty of Arts and Science webpage.

Please note that this form is only used to apply for the Letter of Permission and Queen's does not apply to the host university on your behalf. After you have received a Letter of Permission indicating that you may take the requested courses for credit transfer, you must apply directly to the host university for admission as a visiting student, using your Letter of Permission as your basis for admission. From that point forward, all dates, deadlines, fees and regulations pertaining to your registration in the course and your completion of the course are between you and the host university. When you complete the course, you must arrange for the host university to mail your official transcript directly to the office that issued you the Letter of Permission.

If this is the last course you need for graduation, be aware of the deadline date by which our office must receive your official transcript in order to confirm your eligibility to graduate. See the Sessional Dates section in the current Faculty of Arts and Science Calendar for more information.

Question

What form do I need to transfer a credit from another university?

Answer

To take a course at another university and have the credit transferred back to your Queen's transcript, you must fill out a Letter of Permission application form [PDF], available for download at the Arts and Science website. If the course you wish to take is offered by a Canadian (domestic) institution, this application goes to the Student Services Office. If the course is offered by an international institution, you must fill out an International Letter of Permission application form [PDF] and submit it to the International Programs Office.

Your form must be completed and submitted along with printouts of the course descriptions (from the host institution's website) and the administrative fee for the application. You must be an Arts and Science student in good academic standing to be eligible to apply for a Letter of Permission. Guidelines for both the domestic and international procedures are available on the Faculty of Arts and Science webpage.

Please note that this form is only used to apply for the Letter of Permission and Queen's does not apply to the host university on your behalf. After you have received a Letter of Permission indicating that you may take the requested courses for credit transfer, you must apply directly to the host university for admission as a visiting student, using your Letter of Permission as your basis for admission. From that point forward, all dates, deadlines, fees and regulations pertaining to your registration in the course and your completion of the course are between you and the host university. When you complete the course, you must arrange for the host university to mail your official transcript directly to the office that issued you the Letter of Permission.

If the course was taken BEFORE you became a Queen's student, you must speak to the Admissions office about the possibility of retroactively transferring the credit. The Faculty of Arts and Science does not assess courses taken before admission to Queen's.

If this is the last course you need for graduation, be aware of the deadline date by which our office must receive your official transcript in order to confirm your eligibility to graduate. See the Sessional Dates section in the current Faculty of Arts and Science Calendar for more information.

Question

What grades do I need to get into graduate school?

Answer

For information on admission to graduate schools you can speak to Career Services in Gordon Hall. Even better, contact the graduate programs you are thinking of applying to directly. Different schools and even different programs within the same school will have different methods of assessing candidates.

Admission will be assessed based on overall grades (and/or grades in the final years of study), successful completion of some specific required courses, possibly your performance on the GRE or other post-graduate test, and perhaps even performance in an interview. Extracurriculars and relevant paid or volunteer work will likely also be an asset. Be wary of anecdotal advice; the best and most current answers will come directly from the admission offices of the graduate schools themselves.

Question

What happens if I fail a course?

Answer

If you fail a course, a letter grade of F will show up on your transcript. Failed courses and their corresponding grades do not count towards your required number of courses for graduation, but are included in your cumulative average (GPA).

You can book an appointment to speak with an academic advisor in the Faculty of Arts and Science Student Services Office to discuss any other consequences that may arise as a result of failure in a particular course.

Question

What is a "prerequisite" or "corequisite" course?

Answer

A prerequisite is a requirement that must be met prior to registration in a course and a corequisite is a course which is taken concurrently with (at the same time as) another course.

See the Definitions page in the Arts and Science Calendar for more information on academic terms.

Question

What is a medial degree?

Answer

A medial degree is an honours degree. Students must focus their studies equally in two different disciplines.

Question

What is a second degree?

Answer

A second degree allows students to build on their current degree with a set number of courses that are taken at Queen’s to earn a second degree.  The additional courses for the second degree must all be completed at Queen’s and registered under the Arts and Science Degree Program, regardless of whether the first degree is from Queen’s or from another post-secondary institution.  For a student to pursue a second degree, the degree must have capacity to accept students, students must be academically competitive, and the degree pairing must be academically viable following the Academic Regulations.

Students can read more about Second degrees at this link.
 
To understand the application process, student may follow this link to Undergraduate Admission.

Question

What is an 'unspecified (UNS) credit'?

Answer

It is not uncommon for several courses to transfer as general elective credits or as ‘unspecified’ (no specific subject or number assigned). While these credits will count toward your degree, they may not count toward your degree Plan.

Question

What is considered a full-time course load?

Answer

In any Fall-Winter academic session, students who are eligible to carry a full-time course load may register in 18.0 units to 36.0 units to be considered full-time in that session. A Fall-Winter course load of 30.0 units is considered to be the normal full-time course load, although students in the range of 18.0 to 36.0 units are considered full-time students.

Unless provided for specifically in their program of study, first-year students are strongly advised not to exceed 30.0 units in their first year of study (15.0 units per term).

In any Fall-Winter academic session, students who are eligible to carry a full-time course load may choose to register in a part-time load of fewer than 18.0 units and yet retain their right to return to full-time study in a future session.

Part-time students are able to take a maximum of 18.0 units during the Fall-Winter academic session (not exceeding 9.0 units per term).

Question

What is going to happen to me if I messed up my school year?

Answer

If your grade point average on the courses you have taken is less than 1.60, you will be placed on Academic Probation. In order to graduate with any degree, a student must have a minimum grade point average of 1.60, so Academic Probation acts as a warning to students that they must improve their overall performance in order to be eligible to graduate in the future.

Enough failed courses overall (or, failed course(s) while you are already on Academic Probation) could result in a requirement to withdraw.

Progression reports are ran through the Faculty Office each spring once final grades are available and students' records are asessed to ensure that they are meeting satisfactory academic thresholds, enabling them to graduate. Academic progress is assessed on students' overall GPA. Students are only assessed if they have attempted at least 18.0 units since their last assessment.

A student could be automatically required to withdraw for one year (RTW1) if his ir her cumulative GPA is 0.70 or less (A course that has been dropped on SOLUS does not count as a failure or as a course attempt.) After the year has lapsed, the student will be eligible to return to studies by completing a Return to Studies Form. Upon return, the student is on academic probation and must raise his or her GPA to 1.60. 

A student could also be required to withdraw for one year if he or she is currently on academic probation and fails to raise his or her GPA to 1.60.

A student could be required to withdraw for a minimum of three years if he or she was at any time required to withdraw for one year and fails to raise his or her GPA to at least 1.60. 

Learn more about RTW1 in the Academic Regulations Section of the Arts and Science Calendar.

Students admitted under the Non-Degree Student Regulation must successfully complete 6.0 units in order to be able to meet the conditions of their admission and continue their studies. Should 3.0 or 6.0 units be failed during this probationary standing, the student will be deemed ineligible to proceed.

Question

What is the "academic penalty" if I don't drop a course by the deadline?

Answer

If you don't drop a course by the published drop deadline, the academic penalty is that you will have to remain in the course, for better or for worse.

If you have been struggling in the course and have missed the drop deadline, you can seek assistance from the instructor, teaching assistants, or a tutor to do your absolute best in improving your performance. A Learning Strategies counsellor (available through the Learning Commons) may also be very helpful.

Alternately, if you have been experiencing extenuating circumstances, beyond your control, that have adversely affected your performance in the course and/or your ability to drop the course within the established deadlines, you can choose to appeal to the Associate Deans (Studies) to request to have the course dropped from your transcript. This formal request will be considered by the Associate Deans (Studies), who will notify you in writing if your appeal has been granted or denied. Remember that an appeal submitted is not the same as an appeal granted: unless it is medically or otherwise prohibitive, you should continue in the course to the best of your ability until you should hear from the Associate Deans (Deans) that the appeal has been successful and the course will be dropped for you.

Question

What is the difference between a 3 year and a 4 year degree?

Answer

A 4-year degree is an “honours” degree where students must focus a significant portion of their studies in one (major) or two (medial) area(s) of study.  Students may also pursue a 4 year honours specialization program that examines a particular area (e.g. life sciences, stage  and screen studies, etc.).   A 4-year honours degree requires 114.0 (BAH) or 120.0 (BSCH) units and students must achieve a minimum Grade Point Average of 1.90 in order to receive the honours degree.

A 3-year degree program is considered a “general” degree where students focus a smaller portion of their studies in one (general) area.  A 3-year degree requires 90.0 units (both BA and BSC) with a minimum Grade Point Average of 1.60.

Question

What is the difference between a Major/Minor and a General degree?

Answer

A Major/Minor is a 4 year honours degree with 114.0 units in Arts or 120.0 units in Science. The course requirements for a Major is 60.0 units and 30.0 for the Minor concentration. A General on the other hand is a 3 year degree program in Arts and Science where students would be in a "General" degree program.

Question

What is the first year like in a direct entry program?

Answer

Students must apply specifically to direct entry programs such as Kinesiology, Physical and Health Education, Computing, Music and Fine Art.  Course selection in direct entry programs is determined by the requirements for the program, with each program allowing a minimum of one or two electives (that can be selected from the Arts and Science offerings available in the Faculty). 

Question

What is the first year like in Arts?

Answer

First year students admitted to the Faculty of Arts and Science will normally choose 30.0 units in first year, which means studying 5 courses each term.

Students admitted to arts are encouraged to select a range of courses to experience the breadth of the Faculty.

Question

What is the first year like in Science?

Answer

First year students admitted to the Faculty of Arts and Science will normally choose 30.0 units in first year, which means studying five courses each term.

Students admitted to science normally enrol in 3 to 4 foundation science courses. Science students may also enrol in Arts courses (including Creative Arts, Languages, Literature and Social Sciences).

Question

What program should I take to get into law school?

Answer

For information on admission to law school you can speak to Career Services in Gordon Hall. Even better, contact the law schools you are thinking of applying to directly.

Generally speaking, no program in and of itself is the magic ticket to law school. Admission will be assessed based on overall grades (and/or grades in the final years of study), performance on the LSAT, and performance in an interview. Extracurriculars and relevant paid or volunteer work will likely also be an asset. Be wary of anecdotal advice; the best and most current answers will come directly from the admission offices of the law schools themselves.

Question

What program should I take to get into medical school?

Answer

For information on admission to medical school you can speak to Career Services in Gordon Hall. Even better, contact the medical schools you are thinking of applying to directly.

Generally speaking, no program in and of itself is the magic ticket to medical school. Admission will be assessed based on overall grades (and/or grades in the final years of study), successful completion of some specific required courses, performance on the MCAT, and performance in an interview. Extracurriculars and relevant paid or volunteer work will likely also be an asset. Be wary of anecdotal advice; the best and most current answers will come directly from the admission offices of the medical schools themselves.

Question

What should I do if I accidentally brought my study notes into the exam hall with me and the proctor found them?

Answer

If you are found to be in the exam hall with unauthorized materials, it is considered a failure to abide by academic regulations. The proctor will fill out an exam incident report and it will go to the Associate Dean (Studies) who may decide to conduct an investigation into a possible departure from academic integrity.

Please see the Academic Integrity section of the Arts and Science website for further details.

Question

What should I do if I am sick and need to go home?

Answer

If an illness will prevent you from attending class, attending an exam, or handing in an assignment, you must contact your instructor(s) and teaching assistants directly to make alternative arrangements. You may also wish to speak to an academic advisor in the Faculty of Arts and Science Student Services Office if you will need to be absent from your studies for a long period of time, or over a significant period of the academic session, such as midterms or final exams.

If you have a parent or other representative call on your behalf, remember that they will not be able to discuss your academic or financial information with the University unless you have specifically designated access rights to them on your SOLUS account.

Make sure to obtain doctors' notes to verify that the time you are taking away from your studies is indeed medically necessary. Your instructors may wish to see your doctors' notes upon your return, and it is within their rights to require you to provide that documentation.

Remember, if you are medically unable to participate in your classes, talk to your instructors and to academic advisors as soon as you can. They will do their best to accommodate your situation so that your academics don't have to be a point of anxiety for you as you recover.

Question

What should I do if I got a grade on my exam that I do not think is fair?

Answer

As a first step, the student should request an informal review of the exam with the instructor concerned. The request must be made within 21 calendar days of receipt of the final mark. If any changes are deemed necessary after this review, the instructor will normally provide a reconsidered grade within a further 21 calendar days of receipt of the request and any further information being submitted by the student. Note that access to the final examination paper may not be granted before the final marks are released.

If the request for an informal review is denied or if the student is not satisfied with the instructor's decision following an informal review of the examination or final grade, the student may appeal the decision, in writing, to the Office of the Associate Dean (Studies) (see Regulation 30, in Appeal of Academic Decisions.) The appeal must be submitted to the Arts and Science Faculty Office within 21 calendar days of receiving the instructor's decision. The appeal must include copies of all relevant documents, and be accompanied by the Faculty appeal fee.

Question

What should I do if I have a failing grade on my transcript that I think should not be there?

Answer

If you believe you received a failing grade unfairly, you should contact your instructor to go over your marks. You have the right to look over your final exam, and the instructor may be able to give you additional feedback on your performance in the course as a whole, and how your mark was determined. Additionally, if the mark was truly entered in error, by bringing it to the attention of the instructor, he or she can submit the appropriate forms to have the correct grade entered.

If you see an F on your transcript for a course which you thought you had dropped, then you must appeal to the Associate Deans (Studies) to request that the course be dropped even though the final drop deadline has passed. You must be able to document extenuating circumstances to submit an appeal; ignorance of the deadlines or careless mistakes on SOLUS are not grounds for an appeal.

If you knew that the failed course had not been dropped but even so would now like to request to have it dropped from your transcript based on extenuating circumstances, you must appeal to the Associate Deans (Studies). Please see the Appeals section of the Arts and Science website for more information.

Question

What should I do if I have a sick family member and have to go home right away?

Answer

If a family member has a severe illness or other health emergency which will prevent you from attending class, attending an exam, or handing in an assignment, you must contact your instructor(s) and teaching assistants directly to make alternative arrangements. You may also wish to speak to an academic advisor in the Faculty of Arts and Science Student Services Office if you will need to be absent from your studies for a long period of time, or over a significant period of the academic session, such as midterms or final exams.

If you have a parent or other representative call on your behalf, remember that they will not be able to discuss your academic or financial information with the University unless you have specifically designated access rights to them on your SOLUS account.  To do so on SOLUS, go to Personal Information then choose "release of information".

Make sure to obtain doctors' notes or other documentation to verify that the time you are taking away from your studies is indeed medically necessary. Your instructors may wish to see your doctors' notes upon your return, and it is within their rights to require you to provide that documentation.

Remember, if you are unable to participate in your classes due to extenuating circumstances beyond your control, talk to your instructors and to academic advisors as soon as you can. They will do their best to accommodate your situation so that your academics don't have to be a point of anxiety for you as you recover.

Question

What should I do if I have an exam and I am too sick to write it?

Answer

If you have a severe illness or other health emergency which will prevent you from attending class, attending an exam, or handing in an assignment, you must contact your instructor(s) and teaching assistants directly to make alternative arrangements. Your instructor can work with you to schedule a deferred exam based on your expected recovery time, which should be indicated in your doctors' notes. You may also wish to speak to an academic advisor in the Faculty of Arts and Science Student Services Office, particularly if your absence from your studies will be lengthy.

As mentioned above, make sure to obtain doctors' notes or other documentation to verify that the time you are taking away from your studies is indeed medically necessary. Your instructors may wish to see your doctors' notes upon your return, and it is within their rights to require you to provide that documentation.

If you have a parent or other representative call on your behalf, remember that they will not be able to discuss your academic or financial information with the University unless you have specifically designated access rights to them on your SOLUS account.

Remember, if you are unable to participate in your classes due to extenuating circumstances beyond your control, talk to your instructors and to academic advisors as soon as you can. They will do their best to accommodate your situation so that your academics don't have to be a point of anxiety for you as you recover.

Question

What should I do if I have three exams in three days?

Answer

Unfortunately, three exams in three consecutive days is not considered an exam conflict. Only the following scenarios are considered scheduling conflicts:

  • two exams at the same time
  • an exam at the same time as a religious observance
  • three exams in three consecutive exam slots (i.e. 2:00 pm, 7:00 pm, and 9:00 am).

In these cases, individual arrangements are made for each student. You must complete an application to the Exams Office for an accommodation for an official exam conflict. The only alternative is to speak to your instructor to see if they are willing to accommodate you and rearrange your exam, but most likely they will refer you back to the Exams Office.

For further information, please see the Registrar's page on exam conflicts

Question

What should I do if I have tried contacting my instructor several times but I have not received a response?

Answer

The next step would be to contact the Undergraduate Chair of the department with your concerns. The Undergraduate Chair should be able to help you get in touch with your instructor and to obtain any information or assistance that you need.

Question

What's the next step after I get my letter of permission?

Answer

Please note that Queen's does not apply to the host university on your behalf. After you have received a Letter of Permission indicating that you may take the requested courses for credit transfer, you must apply directly to the host university for admission as a visiting student, using your Letter of Permission as your basis for admission. From that point forward, all dates, deadlines, fees and regulations pertaining to your registration in the course and your completion of the course are between you and the host university. When you complete the course, you must arrange for the host university to mail your official transcript directly to the office that issued you the Letter of Permission.

If this is the last course you need for graduation, be aware of the deadline date by which our office must receive your official transcript in order to confirm your eligibility to graduate. See the Sessional Dates section in the current Faculty of Arts and Science Calendar for more information.

Forms for both the domestic and international letters of permission are available on the Faculty of Arts and Science webpage.

Question

When I get a letter of permission, does this mean I'm signed up for the course at the other university?

Answer

No - Queen's does not apply to the host university on your behalf. After you have received a Letter of Permission indicating that you may take the requested courses for credit transfer, you must apply directly to the host university for admission as a visiting student, using your Letter of Permission as your basis for admission. From that point forward, all dates, deadlines, fees and regulations pertaining to your registration in the course and your completion of the course are between you and the host university. When you complete the course, you must arrange for the host university to mail your official transcript directly to the office that issued you the Letter of Permission.

The Letter of Permission application form [PDF] is available for download at the Arts and Science website. If the course you wish to take is offered by a Canadian (domestic) institution, this application goes to the Student Services Office. If the course is offered by an international institution, you must fill out an International Letter of Permission application form [PDF] and submit it to the International Programs Office.

Your form must be completed and submitted along with printouts of the course descriptions (from the host institution's website) and the administrative fee for the application. You must be an Arts and Science student in good academic standing to be eligible to apply for a Letter of Permission. Guidelines for both the domestic and international procedures are available on the Faculty of Arts and Science webpage.

If this is the last course you need for graduation, be aware of the deadline date by which our office must receive your official transcript in order to confirm your eligibility to graduate. See the Sessional Dates section in the current Faculty of Arts and Science Calendar for more information.

Question

When is reading week?

Answer

For a complete list of dates for the current academic session please consult the Academic Calendar Dates section of the Arts and Science Calendar or view "Upcoming Dates" on the Arts and Science main web page.

Question

When should I register for Fall/Winter courses?

Answer

It may not be possible for you to Register for Fall/Winter courses without your transfer credit assessment being complete. You will have difficulty registering in courses that require prerequisites that you have satisfied elsewhere. You will likely need the assistance of the Departmental Chair of Undergraduate Studies (DCUS) or their assistant. We also recommend that you discuss your academic plans with the DCUS in person or by telephone to ensure that you will be making satisfactory progress toward your intended degree. See the list of Department links for more information.

Question

Where do I pick up my correspondence assignments?

Answer

Returned assignments and exams for correspondence courses can be picked up from the CDS office at F100 MacKintosh-Corry Hall between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 12:00 p.m. and 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m., Monday to Friday.

Question

Who can I talk to for advice on my program and courses?

Answer

Half-hour academic advising sessions are available to Arts and Science students daily from Monday to Friday, with appointment start times from 9:30 to 11:30 in the morning and 1:30 to 3:30 in the afternoon. Students have the option of coming in person or having a telephone appointment. In order to book an appointment, call the Student Services Office (613-533-2470) at 9:00 am to schedule for later the same day. Advisors' schedules are filled on a first-come-first-served basis, so please call early. Appointments can also be booked in person at Student Services, Mackintosh-Corry Hall.

Department advisors are also available for academic advising; consult your department(s) for information on how to schedule an appointment.

First-year students in the Faculty of Arts and Science are encouraged to begin by visiting a Peer Academic Support Service (PASS) Advisor in the Faculty Office. This drop-in advising service is available 9-4 on weekdays through the Fall/Winter academic session.

For more information on advising please see the Faculty of Arts and Science Advising Services and Resources page.

Question

Who can I talk to if my instructor has sent me a form that says I plagiarized in my paper?

Answer

When an instructor sees evidence in your work that suggests that a departure from academic integrity may have taken place, it is the instructor’s responsibility to initiate an investigation into the situation. The initial letter is to notify you of the beginning of the investigation, not to inform you that a finding of departure from academic integrity has been determined, nor to impose sanctions or penalties.

If you wish, you can receive procedural support and representation during an academic integrity investigation from the Office of Dispute Resolution Mechanisms.

Please view Academic Regulation 1 for more information about Academic Integrity.

Question

Why does a course I dropped still show on SOLUS with a DR beside it?

Answer

Courses dropped by the financial deadline will not appear on your transcript.

Courses dropped after the financial deadline but within the academic deadline will appear as a "DR" meaning "dropped" on your transcript. 

Dropped courses do not affect your cumulative average and are not counted towards your required number of courses for graduation; academically, it is as though you had never enrolled in the course. Note, however, that if you drop a course after the deadline to receive a full refund, your tuition refund will be reduced as per the Registrar's fee refund schedule.

Question

Why won't SOLUS let me add a course?

Answer

There are various reasons why you may be unable to add a course on SOLUS, so pay close attention to the error message that you receive from the system.

Check the current session's timetable to make sure that the course information you are entering in your request is correct and up-to-date.

Sometimes a course cannot be added if the necessary prerequisites or corequisites are not in place, or if you have not reached the overall year of study required. Certain courses may be reserved solely for students registered in a particular program of studies.

In general, you can add courses on SOLUS provided you have completed the previous steps to registration for the current academic session, including clearing any past debts to the university and making the minimum tuition payment into your Queen's fee account.

If you have been away from your studies for one semester or more, you must fill out a Return to Studies form from our website which will indicate your intention to return.

If you have completed all the necessary steps to registration and meet all of the other requirements to be in a course and still are unable to add it on SOLUS, please contact the Student Services Office in F200 Mackintosh-Corry Hall (613-533-2470), or the department that offers the course.

Question

Will a 0-level course count as a credit for my degree?

Answer

Courses numbered from 001 to 009 are generally considered pre-university level courses offered at the discretion of the Department, and are primarily intended for students who do not have Ontario 4U or equivalent standing in the subject. They may function as prerequisite courses for 100-level courses. Unless otherwise indicated, these courses are offered for credit as electives in any degree program.

Courses numbered 010 to 099 are intended primarily as electives and normally do not lead to further courses in the subject and do no count towards the completion of a concentration, unless under special conditions laid down by the Department.

Consult the department offering the course if you have any specific questions about a particular course, but it is unlikely that any issues will arise if you are simply taking it as an elective.

Question

Will course drops show on my official transcript?

Answer

Any course taken in the Winter Term 2011, or in any earlier term, that has been dropped for whatever reason will not appear on the official transcript.

Any course taken in the Summer Term 2011, or in any subsequent term, that is dropped after the academic deadline will appear on the official transcript.

Question

Will I be able to graduate this year?

Answer

To check if you have enough units and the right units to graduate, first consult the current year's degree plan section in the Faculty of Arts and Science Calendar. Second, visit the departmental office for your program, where advisors will be able to help you calculate where you stand in terms of their program and plan requirements.

By submitting your application to graduate on SOLUS during the appropriate timelines, you allow the Faculty's Degree Coordinators to assess the status of your degree. If you are missing anything, you will be notified as soon as possible.

If you still have questions after consulting the Calendar and the department, contact the Student Services Office to schedule an advising appointment with an academic advisor.

Question

Will I be kicked out of school if my professor sent me a letter suspecting me of plagiarism?

Answer

When an instructor sees evidence in your work that suggests that a departure from academic integrity may have taken place, it is the instructor’s responsibility to initiate an investigation into the situation. The initial letter is to notify you of the beginning of the investigation, not to inform you that a finding of departure from academic integrity has been determined, nor to impose sanctions or penalties. There is a wide range of sanctions that may be assessed if the investigation results in a finding of departure from academic integrity, and it would be only an extremely serious case that could result in expulsion from the university.

Please visit the Arts and Science website for more information on Academic Integrity, including Academic Regulation 1 of the Arts and Science Calendar.