Art History & Art Conservation

DEPARTMENT OF

Art History & Art Conservation

DEPARTMENT OF

Art History & Art Conservation

site header

Art History Graduate Courses

MA students may take one graduate course in another department as a part of their degree. You need to consult with that professor and department to get permission to take the course and follow the registration procedure for that course/department.

Courses at the 800 and 900 levels (purely graduate courses) are available to MA and Ph.D. students. You can check times for these courses on SOLUS. To register, please contact the Art History assistant, Dawn Lloyd (art.history@queensu.ca). Courses at the 400/800 level are open only to 4th-year undergraduate students and MA students (not to Ph.D. students). There are only four spaces for graduate students in each of these courses, which is generally sufficient, but we will consult with the instructor if necessary. If you wish to do an internship at the Agnes, you should consult with the relevant curator as soon as possible (the deadline for applying for Winter term is in October).Art History MA and Ph.D. students may also take the Art Conservation courses listed below, with permission of the instructor. These are Art History & Art Conservation courses and therefore do not count as a course from another department.

Graduate Seminars 2018-2019

FALL TERM:

Topics in Critical and Cultural Theory: Methods for an Expanded Art History

ARTH 804 (3.0)

This class will enable students to explore various methods of an expanded art history addressing not only art works, but also objects of visual and material culture, institutional practices of collecting and display, and the writing of art history itself. Methods to be explored include iconography, formalism, semiotics, post-structuralism, Marxism, psychoanalysis, feminism, queer theory, thing theory, postcolonial and decolonial theory, and trauma theory. Throughout we will be concerned with reading closely and critically such that students feel empowered to determine which methods are most suited to the research questions and objects to which they are drawn. Students will be encouraged to develop writing projects that explore different ways of putting theory into expanded art historical practice. 

Instructor: Allison Morehead

Museums, Collecting and Culture II: The Louvre Museum from 1793 to 1815

​ARTH 811 (3.0)

This graduate-only seminar will focus on the Louvre Museum in Paris from the year of its opening as a public museum in 1793 until the fall of Napoleon Bonaparte and the restoration of the Bourbon monarchy in 1814-15. During these two decades, transformations to the size, scope, display and definition of the Louvre collection took place, consequent on the political crisis of the French Revolution. Most significantly, during the French Wars of 1794-1801, which were sparked by the revolution, hundreds of valuable paintings and antiquities were confiscated from the Continent and from North Africa. Subsequently, under Napoleon, the Louvre was refashioned as his imperial museum. Yet when he fell from power, the demand by European countries for the repatriation of their treasures occasioned the first major event of art restitution. The legacy of these developments at the Louvre will be evaluated, as seen, for instance, in: the repeated pattern of imperial looting by Hitler during WWII; the tendency of some to associate art museums with imperialism and colonialism; and the pressure placed on major museums today to restitute cultural objects. 

Instructor: C. Hoeniger

Studies in Northern Renaissance Art- Materials and Techniques of Pieter Bruegel the Elder

ARTH 844  (3.0)

Pieter Bruegel the Elder (c. 1525-1569) was a highly versatile artist, and uniquely important in sixteenth century Netherlandish art. His remarkably varied oeuvre consists of, among others, drawings, print designs, panel paintings in oil, and paintings on cloth in distemper, a glue-based paint. From October 2, 2018 through January 13, 2019, the very first comprehensive exhibition on the artist will be presented at the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna, Austria. In conjunction with this event, Queen’s Art History and Art Conservation Department will offer a unique seminar course for graduate students. Prof. Ron Spronk, one of the curators of the exhibition, will lead preparatory meetings in Kingston in October (see dates above) and an intensive two-week seminar at the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna, which will feature presentations, exhibition visits, and excursions. A two-day conference of world-renowned Bruegel scholars will be integrated in the curriculum.

Instructor: R. Spronk

Caravaggio & Artemisia

ARTH 451/847  (3.0)

This course explores the impact of one of the best known artists of all time, Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (1573-1610), and his contemporaries in Baroque Italy. A pop icon today who has inspired an entire industry of scholarship, novels, and a feature film, this tormented, sensual, yet deeply pious artist is the only Italian Baroque painter to remain a household name. We will explore Caravaggio's intense naturalism and populist piety and the controversies caused by both, his relationship with Catholic devotions and religious orders, his sense of drama and supernatural light, and the role of his personality in works of art. We will consider how Baroque Italians interpreted religious paintings; how they viewed the saints and sinners depicted in them; and the dynamics of art commissions.

This course will also look at the most prominent woman painter of the Baroque, an equally controversial figure named Artemisia Gentileshci, who has occupied a comparable place in the popular imagination. An artist who was deeply influenced by Caravaggio but who developed her own unique style, Artemisia has been the subject of an impressive amount of recent scholarship, a novel, a Broadway play, and a feature film. Both Caravaggio and Artemisia combine the sensual and the sacred and have larger-than-life biographies. One of the goals of this course is to look at the ways in which these artists' personalities have been projected onto their work by scholars, essayists, novelists, and filmmakers.

Instructor: G. Bailey

Agnes Etherington Art Centre Practicum

ARTH 880 (3.0)

Fall, winter, or summer. Various instructors.

​Directed Research in a Cultural Institution

ARTH 890 (3.0)

This course is intended to provide graduate students an opportunity to undertake a directed research project in an art gallery, museum, or archive. The research will focus on some aspect of the chosen institution's collection and will be supervised by a specialist in that area who works at the institution or co-supervised by such a specialist and a faculty member. Fall, winter, or summer.

Directed Reading

ARTH 897 (3.0)

Individual directed reading course under the guidance of a faculty member in an area of the instructor's expertise. Fall or Winter. Offered by permission of instructor only. Students interested in pursuing a Directed Reading should contact the faculty member they would like to work with to discuss a possible topic and work plan.


WINTER TERM:

Topics in Visual and Material Culture 1: Public Art & Sensory Implication

ARTH 812  (3.0)

This course will focus on public art, activism, and other interventions in public space. We will examine the way sin which public art implicates viewers in a politics of accountability through its sensory, material and affective impact. How do public art’s forms, materiality and modes of address act as strategies of sensory interpellation?

Instructor: D. Robinson

Topics in Medieval Art: Medievalism: The Myth of the Middle Ages in Modernity, c. 1750–1950

ARTH 415/838  (3.0)

"The Middle Ages" may be the dominant myth of Western modernity. Perpetually reimagined from the Renaissance onward as an other, a pre-industrial, pre-modern, even prelapsarian period, "the Middle Ages; has become a locus for modernity to project its anxieties about the present and to express its longing for a lost past. The Middle Ages suggested to modernity a figure to explore radical social formations: political utopias, religious and aesthetic structures, anti-industrial returns to nature, queer monastic structures, etc. Put differently, the Middle Ages was one of the most progressive tropes through which political and aesthetic change was imagined in modernity. This course will explore the revival of medieval forms in the eighteenth century and press forward to focus on the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, with a particular focus on English, American and Canadian art. We will explore progenitors of medievalism in architecture, painting and interior design such as Horace Walpole and William Beckford, social reactionaries such as AWN Pugin, then consider the achievements of the Pre-Raphaelites, William Blake, William Burgess, C.R. Ashbee, Walter Crane, and North American iterations of medievalism in the work of Ralph Adams Cram, American neo-medieval buildings such as Hammond Castle and Toronto's Casa Loma. 

Instructor: M. Reeve

Studies in Italian Renaissance Art: Colour

ARTH 842 (3.0)

Colour was both an idea and a commodity in the Renaissance. The same word denoted artists' paint and women's make-up, and so colour was reviled as feminine - mere surface - in contrast to the masculine, more intellectual rigours of two-dimensional design and sculptural form. At the same time, however, colour was the means by which artists brought their works to life, adding blood and flesh to skeletal designs so that their paintings and sculptures blushed and bled. Likewise, individual colours could evoke a whole host of contradictory associations, many of which were tied to the complex and often costly processes for procuring and using pigments. The whites, blacks, reds, blues, greens and other unusual hues used in Renaissance painting and sculpture were obtained from dirt, shells, rocks, metals, insects, and plants from local sources but also imported from such difficult to access locations as the mountains of Afghanistan and the so-called New World. Whole international industries were created for colour, battles were fought, and lives were lost. The most precious blue costs thousands of times more than the cheapest brown, but even inexpensive, locally obtainable colours have their own story to tell. White, for example, was made from a black metal, whereas the most common black was created from white bones. Complicated recipes for making and applying pigments call for spit and urine, among other ingredients. Colour is therefore the earthiest of stuff, a commodity you can weigh and price, but it is also something notoriously difficult to describe. Whereas you can measure a painting to see if the linear perspective or proportions are correct, how do you judge an artist's use of colour? 

Instructor: U. D'Elia

Studies in Northern European Art of the 17th Century II: Making and Marketing Art in the Dutch Republic

ARTH 846 (3.0)

In 17th-century Europe, the Dutch Republic (the present-day Netherlands) was unique in several respects: a proto-democracy where entrepreneurship, commerce, and intellect trumped hereditary nobility in building social capital, and where people from diverse ethnic and religious backgrounds put aside their differences in the pursuit of peace and profit. As the rising middle class gained wealth and sophistication, the Dutch art market broadened to include products in diverse media offered to consumers at all economic levels. This seminar will explore how producers of visual and material culture shaped and responded to this dynamic new environment. Readings and research will concentrate primarily on artists active in Amsterdam, home to the liveliest art market in Northern Europe and launching pad for Dutch colonial exploration and commerce. Rembrandt van Rijn was the most famous of dozens of artists who left their home cities to seek opportunities there. The art of Rembrandt and his circle will be studied in depth, but attention will also be given to contemporaries active throughout the Republic. Depending on the student interest, this might include painters such as Johannes Vermeer, Gerard van Honthorst, Judith Leyster, or Jacob van Ruisdael, as well as printmakers (and publishers), silversmiths, architects, or sculptors. Students may also choose to conduct research from the consumer's point of view, studying the collecting habits of an individual, family, or group using data analysis to examine broader market trends. 

Instructor: S. Dickey

Studies in Contemporary Art I: Contemporary Art and Curatorial Practice

ARTH 422/868 (3.0)

This practice-based seminar offers students an opportunity to explore critical issues in contemporary art and curatorial practice while collaboratively curating an exhibition at the Agnes Etherington Art Centre. Through direct involvement with the gallery, students will conceive of, plan, and implement and exhibition of contemporary art from the Agnes' permanent collection. The student-curated show will open in fall 2019. The aim of this course is to introduce students to theories and practices of contemporary art at the same time that they gain hands on experience in the various roles and responsibilities involved in curating an exhibition, from developing a theme to installing the work. 

Instructor: J. Kennedy

Agnes Etherington Art Centre Practicum

ARTH 880 (3.0)

Fall, winter, or summer. Various instructors.

Directed Research in a Cultural Institution

ARTH 890 (3.0)

This course is intended to provide graduate students an opportunity to undertake a directed research project in an art gallery, museum, or archive. The research will focus on some aspect of the chosen institution's collection and will be supervised by a specialist in that area who works at the institution or co-supervised by such a specialist and a faculty member. Fall, winter, or summer.

Directed Reading

ARTH 897 (3.0)

Individual directed reading course under the guidance of a faculty member in an area of the instructor's expertise. Fall or Winter. Offered by permission of instructor only. Students interested in pursuing a Directed Reading should contact the faculty member they would like to work with to discuss a possible topic and work plan.


Art Conservation Courses open to Art History graduate students (with permission of the instructor): 

Conservation Principles

ARTC 801
* Permission of the instructor needed

Coordinator: Fiona Graham

Fall and Winter Terms (please note that this is a 3.0 credit course spread over two terms)

Imaging and Documentation

ARTC 810

Instructor: Norman Paul

* Permission of the instructor needed. Please note that special arrangements for access to the photography studio can be arranged but availability of facilities is restricted.

Fall 2018

History, Technology and Conservation of Paintings I

ARTC 821

* Permission of the instructor needed
Instructor: Patricia Smithen

Fall 2018

History, Technology and Conservation of Paintings II

ARTC 822

* Permission of the instructor needed

Instructor: Patricia Smithen

Winter 2019

History, Technology and Conservation of Paper Objects I

ARTC 831
* Permission of the instructor needed
Instructor: Rosaleen Hill

Fall 2018

History, Technology and Conservation of Paper Objects

ARTC 832

* Permission of the instructor needed

Instructor: Rosaleen Hill

Winter 2019

Prerequisite: ARTC 831