Student Profiles

Hannah Ascough

Hannah Ascough (PhD Candidate)
Supervisor:  Marc Epprecht
Start:  September 2018
Email:  17ha10@queensu.ca

My research centers on environmental charities, in South Africa and internationally. Specifically, I am interrogating how these ENGOs are framing a just recovery from COVID-19, and what that recovery means for ENGO beneficiaries, employees, and donors – capturing the juxtaposition between large- and small-scale environmental charitable work. Ultimately, my project concerns itself with both projected and experienced “futures” that emerge from development institutions’ imaginaries, and so locates itself within the intersections of feminist political ecology, degrowth, eco-socialism, and post-development theory.

Allyson Dafoe

Allyson Dafoe (PhD Candidate)
Supervisor:  Susanne Soederberg
Start:  September 2021
Email: 13akd@queensu.ca

My research interests centre around the military-industrial complex and the involvement of private military and security companies (PMCs/PSCs) in extractive industries. Situated in the context of extensive and continued environmental degradation, my research will consider what available information on PMCs/PSCs in extractive industries tells us about access to and control over resources.

Alina Dixon

Alina Dixon (PhD Candidate)
Supervisor:  Allison Goebel
Start:  September 2018
Email:  1ad1@queensu.ca

My research focuses on the knowledge politics of ‘peacebuilding’ as it pertains to youth. Specifically, I am interested in troubling the western, liberal traditions of the dominant peacebuilding lexicon by examining how peacebuilding knowledge is constructed and maintained, and what the implications of this are for youth-led, everyday peace efforts. With a geographic focus on East Africa I am ultimately looking to investigate how youth action is conceptualized in relation to the more general processes of ‘building peace’, what it means for ‘peacebuilding’ as a liberal, political project, and what a more youth-inclusive vision of peacebuilding could look like. I hope to unveil the extent to which ‘peacebuilding’ has ignored, suppressed, or misinterpreted the actions of young people. 

Veronique Dryden

Veronique Dryden (PhD Candidate)
Supervisor: Susanne Soederberg
Start:  September 2021
Email:  20vmd@queensu.ca

My research interests lie in unpacking the contradictions inherent in the use of neoliberal ideas to drive development policies and planning in the Global South. I plan to study the intersections of political ecology, political economy and social reproduction in order to consider the tensions inherent in the treatment of land, labour and money as commodities using a multi-scalar critique and utilizing a Marxist feminist approach. In so doing, I will explore the role of ideology and knowledge production in global development to break down some of the main tropes in institutional development policy. Geographically, this research will focus on post-colonial Manila.

Claire Genest

Claire Genest (PhD Candidate)
Supervisor:  Susanne Soederberg
Start:  September 2021
Email:  20cg9@queensu.ca

My research interests are situated in the field of global political economy, and more specifically on the relations of power that underpin market-oriented development strategies within the broader context of neoliberalism and global capitalism. My current research investigates the geographical expansion of capitalism through social finance initiatives for housing, focusing on the exploitation of populations made surplus under neoliberalism and capitalism.

Janette Haase

Janette Haase (PhD Candidate)
Supervisor: Marcus Taylor
Start:  September 2020
Email:  21jth1@queensu.ca

I propose to explore the use of regenerative and no-till agriculture in Ontario and Quebec through research and interviews with farmers and government and non-governmental agencies involved in this work. I seek to better understand the motivations, challenges, and experiences of transitioning to this type of agriculture and the conditions for its successful adoption. Agriculture is an incredibly complex social practice, deeply rooted in local cultures but also highly manipulated by large corporate interests. Current research on alternative agriculture highlights themes of social and environ-mental justice, climate change, food sovereignty, inequality and the ownership of both knowledge and nature. I seek to learn more about debates over sustainable agriculture and rural development and apply them to current agricultural models and our (in)ability to realize meaningful food system transformation close to home.

Avanthi Jayasuriya

Avanthi Jayasuriya (PhD Candidate)
Supervisor: Susanne Soederberg
Start:  September 2021
Email:  20anj2@queensu.ca

My research interests are grounded within Feminist Political Economy and social policy. Broadly, my research focuses on the political economy of social policy and its impact on marginalised populations paying attention to the intersections of gender, race and class.

Zilong Liao

Zilong Liao (PhD Candidate)
Supervisor: Susanne Soederberg
Start:  September 2020
Email:  20zl34@queensu.ca

Generally, I am interested in almost everything related to capitalism and modernity. Currently, my academic interest lies in the political economy of profit, which is also the focal point of my doctoral research. Due to the fact that the explanation of profit, a cornerstone around which the whole economic activities are built, is astonishingly overlooked by mainstream economics, it is meaningful to seriously delve into this subject. My research will draw on radical economics and institutionalism, seeking to demonstrate that profit is a category and phenomenon embedded with abundant social connotations far richer than what the equilibrium methodology can reveal. One important dimension of those social connotations is power. Power is a force that shapes social institutions. Institutions, in turn, dictate the specific expression and morphology of power. “Financial capitalism”, characterized by financial deregulation, dollar standard, unbridled monetary stimulus, etc., to a large extent, has altered the logic of profit/capital accumulation of “commodity capitalism”. My research attempts to disclose how power is wielded in this special institutional setting in favor of profiting. In a general sense, it echoes Marxism in understanding profit from a political perspective, contrasting the depoliticizing trend in mainstream economics. Yet it significantly differs from critical economics for it understands profit or the expression of power as constantly rheological in its content, which is paralleled with and influenced by the evolution of social institutions.

Sandra McKay

Sandra McKay (PhD Candidate)
Supervisor: Rebecca Hall
Start:  September 2021
Email:  21srm12@queensu.ca

I am interested in the mining and development debate. My research looks at the conditions that influence the role that artisanal and small-scale gold mining has in improving local sustainable livelihoods in Peru. These include issues such as the negotiation and conflicts between large-scale mining and community-based small-scale mining, trade and cooperation between Canada and Peru, and private governance initiatives.

Meghan Mendelin

Meghan Mendelin (PhD Candidate)
Supervisor: Susanne Soederberg
Start:  September 2021
Email:  14mkm8@queensu.ca

One of my research interests includes the political economy of petro-infrastructure in Canada, particularly the ways through which large-scale privatized oil and gas projects are justified and promoted by the Canadian state in the face of growing resistance by environmental and Indigenous groups. My current research examines the protective mechanisms of neoliberal extractivism in Canada and their impact on the right to protest and dissent. I am also very interested in the ethical dilemmas of poverty marketization by non-profit and humanitarian agencies and their role in the dissemination of the development discourse.

Daniel Ortiz Gallego

Daniel Ortiz Gallego (PhD Candidate)
Supervisor: Diana Córdoba
Start:  September 2021
Email:  daniel.ortizgallego@queensu.ca

My research focuses on alternatives to agribusiness development that challenge the dominant neoliberal food regime and contribute to potential sustainable transitions. Particularly, I am interested in understanding the complex working of power in oil palm and soybean agribusiness for their consolidation in Colombia and Bolivia and the strategies of resistance of grassroots organizations aimed at eroding this power, such as the peasant economies, agroecology, and food sovereignty.

Brandon Pryce

Brandon Pryce (PhD Candidate)
Supervisor: Rebecca Hall
Start:  September 2018
Email:  11bp16@queensu.ca

My research focuses on critical engagements with the history of Canada as an extractive state. I take a historical materialist approach to the origins of extraction throughout Canada but particularly in the North and how it has impacted Indigenous and minority communities. In addition to extraction and resources, my work also investigates the political economy of tourism and hospitality in rural, remote, and indigenous communities. Alongside my supervisor Dr. Rebecca Hall, we work with Dene communities in the Northwest Territories on post-extraction development and Indigenous-led alternative development. Overall, I utilize a Marxian political-economy framework as well as critical decolonization studies to approach the topic of development.

Maya Saryyeva

Maya Saryyeva (PhD Candidate)
Supervisor: Kyla Tienhaara
Start:  September 2019
Email:  19ms59@queensu.ca

I study governance frameworks surrounding sustainable finance, and in particular the transparency and effectiveness of green bond projects.

Jordan Stark

Jordan Stark (PhD Candidate)
Supervisor: David McDonald
Start:  September 2019
Email:  19jds1@queensu.ca

Broadly, my research lies at the intersection of data, development, and the city. My research project contributes to scholarly understandings of data justice and the ways in which it can be supported in the context of open data initiatives in South Africa (with implications for other cities in the global South). Focusing on open data in Cape Town, one of the first municipal open data initiatives in the global South, I ask how access to knowledge and the benefits of open data can be more equitably distributed in conditions of extreme inequality.

Makiko Brown

Makiko Brown (MA Candidate)
Start:  September 2021
Email:  21meb20@queensu.ca

My research interests include migration, diasporas and how remittances can support economic development. I would like to examine formal and informal networks within diasporas that encourage migration and the transfer of wealth between countries. I would like to apply an interdisciplinary approach to examine economic issues and the politics of citizenship. I am interested in the intersection of race, gender and immigration policies that affect documented and undocumented workers.

Kelsey Jennings

Kelsey Jennings (MA Candidate)
Start:  September 2021
Email:  13krj1@queensu.ca

In 2020 alone, Canada saw three major Indigenous resistances, the Mi'kmaq lobster dispute, the Wet'suwet'en resistance to the Coastal Gas Line project and 1492 Land Back Lane. These resistances provide a vital opportunity to look at the movement of Indigenous people and communities to return to self-determinacy. For my research, I am primarily interested in evaluating Indigenous livelihoods and self-determination in Canada. Looking at key settler-colonial conflicts, I am also interested in assessing the effects that the actions of the Canadian Government, primarily when related to economic development, have had on the ability of Indigenous communities to construct and sustain livelihoods. As a part of this, I am also interested in critically analyzing Canada's adoption of and promise to implement the United Nations Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous People (UNDRIP) and the evolution and history of Indigenous rights in Canada.

Holly Laurenzio

Holly Laurenzio (MA Candidate)
Start:  September 2021
Email: 21hhrl@queensu.ca

It is estimated that over 1.6 billion workers in the informal economy were put at risk of losing their livelihoods amidst the COVID-19 crisis. I hope to contribute to the research on sustainable livelihood recovery across Latin America’s agrarian and informal sectors in the wake of COVID-19. Fueled by my undergraduate research on the political ecology of irresponsible coconut water consumption, I am inspired to examine how responsible production and consumption can contribute to sustainable livelihoods. Focusing on the conditions of vulnerability that perpetuate inequalities in livelihood recovery, I hope to contribute to research on how agrarian and informal producers in Latin America are undervalued and most affected by COVID-19.

Reily Morrison

Reily Morrison (MA Candidate)
Start:  September 2021
Email:  16rmm4@queensu.ca

I’ve taken a particular interest in food regime theory and understanding the interplay between power and politics in structuring the world food system and shaping individual’s food consumption. I am very keen to look further into the political economy of food, specifically as it related to the emergence of counter-movements such as food sovereignty. I am also intrigued by the value of Indigenous knowledge systems and epistemologies.

Alexa Platt

Alexa Platt (MA Candidate)
Start:  September 2021
Email:  17alp@queensu.ca

My research interests are environmental sustainability and decolonization. I am more specifically interested in analysing and researching how environmental sustainability is shaped by settler colonialism in settler nations. I am also interested in analysing how environmental sustainability movements in settler nations such as Canada may perpetuate the structures of settler colonialism. In doing so, I hope to research ways in which environmental sustainability can coincide with decolonization in settler nations.

Jenna Reid

Jenna Reid (MA Candidate)
Start:  September 2021
Email:  17jmer@queensu.ca

My research interests focus on decolonizing peacebuilding practices and the process of reconciliation in the interests of global human rights and security, to emphasize culturally appropriate responses to conflict and reconciliation. In this process, I hope to examine sociolegal factors that contribute to global war crimes, the weaponization of gendered violence in war, as well as the roles which social movements, non-governmental organizations, and governments play in the various processes of global development.

Caroline Trippenbach

Caroline Trippenbach (MA Candidate)
Start:  September 2021
Email:  12camt@queensu.ca

I want to add my research to the growing body of literature looking at the impacts of mineral extraction projects on neighbouring communities. I want to examine how gender, among other social categorizations, affects or determines the experiences of the communities nearby. I also want to explore what actions these groups and individuals are taking to either mitigate, intensify or nullify the results of these mining projects. I am particularly interested in looking at projects in Canada on Indigenous territory, as well as projects in the Global South owned by Canadian mining companies and their subsidiaries. As we transition to greener technologies in an attempt to reduce the effects of climate change, I believe minerals, as well as these kinds of conversations, will become even more critical.

Jacira Werle Rodrigues

Jacira Werle Rodrigues (MA Candidate)
Start:  September 2021
Email: 21jwr2@queensu.ca

Interdisciplinary qualified professional with vast experience in qualitative research, including data collection, analysis and publication in Brazil and Australia. Working at the Department of Global Development Studies (Queen’s University) in a project aiming to investigate the role of scientists and international networks in a Post-Truth era, within the context of the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), particularly focused in the Brazilian Amazon and the environmental agenda.

Claire Geneste

Claire Genest MA (2021)
Supervisor:  Susanne Soederberg
Second Reader:  Dan Cohen
MRP Title:  Social Impact Bonds as the Failing Forward of Neoliberal Restructuring:  A Canadian Case Study

 

Bessie Hodder Olivera

Bessie Hodder Olivera MA (2021)
Supervisor:  Reena Kukreja
Second Reader:  Mark Hostetler
MRP Title:  U.S. Detention Centres impact on the physical and mental health of Latin migrant women: a case study investigation of the coerced hysterectomies performed in U.S. detention facilities in 2020

 

Avanthi Jayasuriya

Avanthi Jayasuriya MA (2021)
Supervisor:  Susanne Soederberg
Second Reader:  Rebecca Hall
MRP Title:  Relief For Whom? A Feminist Historical Materialist Account of the Covid-19 Relief Measures in Toronto

Muhammad Khan

Khan, Muhammad (MA Candidate)
Start:  September 2020
Email:  19MK47@queensu.ca

I am a photographer and my research interests are surrounding climate change and its effect on the social movements in the middle east. My undergrad research was based around middle eastern social and cultural politics and I hope to continue that by researching how climate change is effecting those movements.

Kylie McNeil

Kylie McNeil MA (2021)
Supervisor:  Susanne Soederberg
Second Reader:  Rebecca Hall
MRP Title:  Can You Pay for Success? An investigation and Critical Analysis into the Nature of Social Investment Bonds Centred Around the Chicago Pay-for-Success Bond

Ana Mejicano Greenberg

Ana Mejicano Greenberg MA (2021)
Supervisor:  Reena Kukreja
Second Reader:  Alexandra Pedersen
MRP Title:  The Making of the “Perpetually Displace-Able”: Investigating the Role of the Guatemalan and the Canadian States in the (Re)production and Maintenance of Racialized Guatemalan Temporary Foreign Workers as a Latent Relative Surplus Population from 1960-Present

Carleigh Milburn

Carleigh Milburn MA (2021)
Supervisor:  Celeste Pedri-Spade
Second Reader:  Lindsay Morcom
MRP Title:  Toward the Inclusion of Indigenous Women’s Arts in Ontario Secondary Schools and its Role in Developing Education for Reconciliation

Ethan Mitchell

Ethan Mitchell (MA Candidate: Thesis Option)
Supervisor: Susanne Soederberg
Start:  September 2020
Email:  15ERAM@queensu.ca

My thesis project is focused on analyzing Community Land Trusts as spaces with the potential to alter the social relations which shape capitalist housing insecurity and exploitation. Drawing on research which theorizes housing as a political-economic relation, as a site of social reproduction, and as a potential site of collective political struggle and 'commoning', my research asks whether CLTs can serve as a means by which economic structures can be contested and altered at the ground level.

Madalyn Neilson

Madalyn Neilsen MA (2021)
Supervisor:  Marcus Taylor
Second Reader:  Diana Cordoba
MRP Title:  The re-introduction of Indigenous breeds of dairy cattle for increase climate resilience in Karnataka, South India

Sinead O'Hara

Sinead O'Hara MA (2021)
Supervisor:  Rebecca Hall
Second Reader:  Susan Bartels
MRP Title:  The Weaponization of Sexual Violence:  An Analysis of Women and Girls Healing in the Democrtatic Republic of the Congo

Kenna Panikkar

Kenna Panikkar MA (2021)
Supervisor:  Scott Rutherford
Second Reader:  Ayca Tomac
MRP Title:  Redefinding what constitutes a "developed nation" in the context of United States with the rescente rise of right wing politics/nationalism.

Jessica Phillips

Jessica Phillips MA (2021)
Supervisor:  Bernadette Resurreccion
Second Reader:  Reena Kukreja
MRP Title:  Migration in the Context of Climate Change:  Cases in the Philippines

Kabir Shahani

Kabir Shahani MA (2021)
Supervisor:  Kyla Tienhaara
Second Reader:  Mark Hostetler
MRP Title:  The Role of Ecotourism in the Development of the Global SouthL  A Case Study on hte Republic of Palau

Tianna Tischbein

Tianna Tischbein MA (2021)
Supervisor: Kyla Tienharra
Second Reader:  Mark Hostetler
MRP Title:  Degrowth post Covid-19

 

Charlotte Akin

Charlotte Akin, MA (2020)

Supervisor:  Reena Kukreja
Second Reader:  Colleen Davison
MRP Title:  Protection & Punishment - The Impacts of the Hotspot Approach on the Rights and Status of Unaccompanied Children in Greece.

 

Matthew Dunbar

Matthew Dunbar (MA Candidate: Thesis Option)
Supervisor:  David McDonald
Start:  September 2019
Email:  13MD70@queensu.ca

I am studying the evolution of development finance within China's One Belt One Road initiatives, with a particular focus on growing financial ties between China and Africa.

Emily Edwards

Emily Edwards, MA (2020)
Supervisor:  Colleen Davison
Second Reader:  Reena Kukreja
MRP Title:  The Neoliberal Market Relations of Global Commercial Surrogacy – A Postcolonial Analysis of Stateless Babies, Outsourced Wombs, and Conflicting Regulations

Jessica Gentile

Jessica Gentile, MA (2020)
Supervisor:  Diana Cordoba
Second Reader:  Allison Goebel
MRP Title:  Not Worth a "Dam" - A Socio-Environmental Analysis of the Experience of Displaced Women Along the Congo River

Brigid Goulem

Brigid Goulem MA Thesis (2021)
Supervisor:  Reena Kukreja
Thesis Title:  Health and Healthcare Access for Undocumented Migrant Agricultural Workers in Greece
 

Rae Jardine

Rae Jardine, MA (2020)
Supervisor:  Mark Hostetler
Second Reader:  Marc Epprecht
MRP Title:  "We Shall Not Wait for Karamoja to Develop":  A Critical Discourse Analysis

Ainsley Johnston

Ainsley Johnston, MA (2020)
Supervisor:  Marcus Taylor
Second Reader:  David McDonald
MRP Title:  The Exploration of Racial Bias in the US Federal Responses to Hurricane Katrina and Hurricane Maria

Alexandria Knipp

Alexandria Knipp, MA (2020)
Supervisors:  Rebecca Hall and Diana Cordoba
MRP Title:  LIFE IN A NATIONAL SACRIFICE ZONE: How the Settler-Colonial State Perpetuates Slow Violence Through Extraction in the Northwest Territories and Appalachian Kentucky

Kristen Ouimet

Kristen Ouimet, MA (2020)
Supervisor:  Diana Cordoba
Second Reader:  David McDonald
MRP Title:  A Conflict of Worlds: Expressions of Buen Vivir in Resistance to the Yanacocha Mine

Michelle Awusu-Ansah

Michelle Owusu-Ansah, MA (2020)
Supervisor:  Marc Epprecht
Second Reader:  Grace Adeniyi-Ogunyankin
MRP Title:  Unmasking the Ghanaian State Analysis of the Ghanaian state's performative nature in addressing domestic and sexual violence (DSV) against women and women's response to the state and DSV through activism

 Julianna Rapper

Julianna Rapper, MA (2020)
Supervisor:  Elia Zureik
Second Reader:  Mark Hostetler
MRP Title:  Strategies of Occupation in Apartheid Israel

Shanaya Singh

Shanaya Singh, MA (2020)
Supervisors:  Marcus Taylor and Allison Goebel
MRP Title:  Assessing the Potential for Canada’s Feminist International Assistance Policy to Support Maasai Women’s Land Rights in Northern Tanzania

Camille Slack

Camille Slack, MA (2020)
Supervisor:  Marcus Taylor
Second Reader:  Scott Rutherford
MRP Title:  The Potential of Food Sovereignty to Inform the Policy Response to Climate Change in the Canadian Arctic

Prateek Sood

Prateek Sood, MA (2020)
Supervisors:  John Harriss and Marcus Taylor
MRP Title:  The Potential of Food Sovereignty to Inform the Policy Response to Climate Change in the Canadian Arctic