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Arts and Science

Arts and Science

[Graduate student dispensing hand sanitizer]
June 1, 2020

Queen’s University researchers and industry partners have mobilized to formulate hand sanitizer for Kingston hospitals.

[Man performing a push-up indoors]
June 1, 2020

Queen’s researcher Brendon Gurd has developed an exercise protocol that requires no equipment, can be completed anywhere, and helps improve muscle endurance in under five minutes a day.

[Chart depicting epidemic trends for Ontario]
June 1, 2020

Queen’s University researcher Troy Day is helping Ontario develop models to predict the future of the virus in the province.

[Art McDonald]
May 4, 2020

A team of Canadian physicists, led by Queen’s Nobel Laureate Art McDonald, is part of an international effort to design a ventilator to help in the treatment of COVID-19.

[The Conversation Logo]
September 3, 2020

Queen's University Relations is pleased to host members of the editorial team from The Conversation Canada as they facilitate online, interactive workshops for Queen's researchers to learn how to leverage the platform and develop and test potential article pitches.

August 25, 2020

Leveraging state-of-the-art machine learning technologies for biomedical data integration and exploration: this research will help to transform how clinicians treat patients with cancer using a data-driven, precision medicine approach.

[Illustration of surveillance technology]
August 12, 2020

"Privacy regulation can't keep pace with the supersystems collecting, analyzing, and using personal data," writes Queen's researcher David Lyon for The Conversation Canada.

[Photograph of a graduation cap]
August 12, 2020

Queen's researcher Allyson G. Harrison discusses what parents and loved ones can do to help high school seniors cope with missed developmental milestones due to COVID-19 for The Conversation Canada.

[Photo of a person scratching their arms]
August 12, 2020

Itchy skin? More aches and pains? Unusual rash? Headaches? Pimples? If you've been experiencing unusual physical symptoms recently, Queen's researcher Kate Harkness explains it may be due to living with chronic stress for The Conversation Canada.

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