Study Sustainability at Queen's

Queen's University is home to leading experts in a spectrum of disciplines related to climate action and environmental sustainability. 


 

School of Environmental Studies

Undergraduate programs in the School of Environmental Studies are interdisciplinary, spanning sciences, social sciences and humanities.

The school highlights inquiry-based and community-engaged learning throughout its curriculum and offers students hand-on experiences in exploring environmental issues and addressing environmental challenges.

Environmental Studies

Urban Planning Studies

The department of Geography and Planning, along with the School of Urban and Regional Planning, developed the Certificate in Urban Planning Studies to allow students to gain recognition for their devoted study of cities.

Students will be introduced to planning-related issues grounded in an appreciation of city life and city structures, and will be prepared for advanced studies and careers related to urban planning, such as community development, real estate, municipal governance, international development or education.

​​​​​​​Certificate in Urban Planning Studies

Collaborative Masters Program in Applied Sustainability

Building on the applied sustainability strategic theme of the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, the objective of the MAS program is to expose students to the implementation of sustainable engineering solutions within the context of broader sustainability theory.

To do this properly, engineering students must not only advance their technical education, but must gain insights into how public policy impacts on the success of engineering solutions to multidisciplinary sustainability problems.

Learn about the CMPAS

Water and Human Health

 

 

Graduate Diploma

The Graduate Diploma in Water and Human Health, hosted by the Beaty Water Research Centre, is designed to give recent graduates and professionals an enhanced understanding of the role of water in driving health outcomes and ultimately the sustainability of populations and communities