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Queen’s set to open its newest student residence

Albert Street Residence
Queen’s newest student residence, located at 156 Albert St., is focused on sustainability and providing modern and inclusive amenities. (Queen's University)

Doors to Queen’s University’s brand-new residence will soon be open, welcoming its inaugural group of first-year students to their new homes for the next eight months.

On Saturday, Sept. 3, more than 320 new undergraduates and 10 dons will move in to the recently completed building located at 156 Albert St. — a five-story structure with a unique design, modern amenities, and leading sustainability features.

“Our newest residence is a wonderful addition to campus, and we look forward to students having opportunities to enjoy its new spaces and amenities,” says Ann Tierney, Deputy Provost and Dean of Student Affairs. “Not only has it achieved high standards for energy efficiency and sustainable design, it has also incorporated inclusive, accessible spaces in which everyone can live, learn, and enjoy their time at Queen’s.”

Welcoming and inclusive

The building contains 334 fully-equipped rooms featuring semi-private washrooms, along with shared study rooms on each floor, laundry facilities, and kitchenettes. The carpet-free structure also has several private and semi-private accessible suites, wheelchair accessible entrances, and is fully serviced by elevators and stairs.

The residence also has some unique new elements, including nap pods, a prayer space, indoor bicycle storage, and even a service animal washing station. Outside in the courtyard, residents and the campus community will also be able to enjoy a new Indigenous gathering space — the newest of several Indigenous spaces across campus.

Albert Street Residence
The Albert Street Residence — which integrates two of the original five houses from the site into its design to maintain the look and feel of the surrounding community — has also achieved Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold certification, contributing to the university’s overall sustainability efforts. (Queen's University)

Sustainable design

The building — which integrated two of the original five houses from the site into its design to maintain the look and feel of the surrounding community — has also achieved Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold certification, contributing to the university’s overall sustainability efforts.

“We are focused on providing modern, sustainable facilities as we invest for the future,” says Donna Janiec, Vice-Principal (Finance and Administration). “As a LEED Gold-level certified building, the Albert Street project represents a significant investment into sustainable student housing capacity in the Kingston area. As we retrofit and renovate our older student housing, we will continue to set a high bar for our facilities to ensure we minimize our impact on the environment and meet our latest sustainability targets.”

The Albert Street residence is similar in size to the last two residences that were built at Queen’s; Both David C. Smith House and Brant House opened in 2015.

This new residence has freed up other residence rooms across campus, allowing renovations to begin. Queen’s will move immediately to renovate the 90-room residence located within the John Deutsch University Centre (JDUC), along with other major elements of the JDUC building, with work set to reach completion in summer 2024.

Members of the Queen’s and Kingston communities will have a chance to tour the new residence on Tuesday, Aug. 30 from Noon – 3 pm for an open house. An official name for the Albert Street building has yet to be selected. Once that process occurs, a formal naming ceremony will be held.