About

Philosophy has been taught at Queen's since the University's first classes were offered in 1842, and the Department has played a prominent role in the evolution of the institution. The Department has offered graduate degrees for over one hundred years, the first Ph.D. (in 1896) also being the first to be awarded in philosophy in Canada.

In recent years, the Department has achieved new heights of flourishing. Since 2017, the Department has welcomed five new appointments in areas such as epistemology, political philosophy and critical prison studies, philosophy of race, philosophy of science and artificial intelligence, and Anishinaabe language, knowledge and culture. The Department’s long-standing strengths in political, moral, and legal philosophy continue to grow, with several new hires and cross-appointments in these areas, and two new programs: the Bachelor of Arts Honours in Politics, Philosophy and Economics, and the Master’s in Political and Legal Thought. In addition to impressive faculty and outstanding students, the Department is home to an increasing number of research groups and projects, and many recurring and special events. Visit the pages linked below to learn more about the Department and its activities.

 

Philosophy History: John Watson

One of the most distinguished figures in Queen's University's early history was the philosopher John Watson, after whom Watson Hall, home to the Department of Philosophy, is named. Born in Glasgow, Scotland, and having studied Theology at the University of Glasgow, Watson arrived at Queen's in 1872, and served as head of the Department of Philosophy for the next 52 years, retiring in 1924. Watson had an enormous influence on the development of the Queen's curriculum; in addition to teaching philosophy, he introduced the disciplines of Economics, Political Studies, and Psychology to the University. He was the first Queen's professor to make a name for himself in the scholarly world and was the first philosopher in Canada to achieve an international reputation. He was an unusually progressive thinker and an early advocate of the admission of women to university. In one of his last books, The State in Peace and War (1919), he urged world governments to be based on tolerance and multicultural integration.

Learn more about John Watson

Faculty & Fellows

See a list of the Department's Faculty and their research interests.

Faculty & Fellows

Graduate

Learn about philosophy graduate studies at Queen's.

Graduate

Undergraduate

Learn about Queen's undergraduate philosophy programs.

Undergraduate

Research

Learn about some of the Department's research groups and projects.

Research

Equity and Diversity

Learn about the Department's commitment to equity and diversity.

Equity and Diversity

Events

Learn about the Department's upcoming, regular and special events.

Events

News

See recent news about the Department and its members.

News