Research Team

Dean Tripp

Curriculum Vitae
(PDF, 1.1 MB)

Dr. Dean Tripp, Ph.D.

Dr. Tripp completed his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology at Dalhousie University in 2000. He joined the Department of Psychology at Queen’s shortly afterward and has been cross-appointed with the Department of Anesthesiology and Urology. He teaches courses in Health Psychology, Interpersonal Therapy, Pain, and Introduction to Psychology and has established his Psychology Pain Research Unit. Dr Tripp has won the prestigious Frank Knox Teaching Excellence Award in 2009 at Queen’s University and has been nominated for several other teaching awards during his time at Queen’s. Dr. Tripp was also recently awarded the Canadian Pain Society Early Career Award (2008) and has been a Clinical Consultant as well as active researcher over the past decade. He has practiced in hospital settings and in the private sector, treating a variety of patient populations (depression, anxiety, diabetes, G.I., HIV, injured athletes, acute and chronic pain patients).


Graduate Students

Alison Crawford

Alison Crawford

PhD Student

Area of research: My primary interests include self-regulation and psychological interventions for chronic pain. For my doctoral dissertation, I'm comparing acceptance and commitment therapy and cognitive-behavioral therapy for chronic pain. My main objective is to compare the effectiveness of these therapies, and to figure out for whom and through what processes these treatments are effective. I hope to work in a clinical setting as either a neuropsychologist or a health psychologist helping individuals with brain injury, chronic pain, and other co-morbid health issues.


Kat Fretz

Kat Fretz

PhD Student

Area of research: My research interests lie in the area of health psychology, which focuses on the intersection between mental and physical health. My doctoral dissertation aims to examine various aspects of well-being among individuals living with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Specifically, we aim to understand how certain under-researched facets of well-being such as mental health, intimacy, and sexuality, impact the lives of individuals with IBD. This important work is generously funded by a CIHR Doctoral Research Award.


Valentina Mihajlovic

Valentina Mihajlovic

PhD Student

Area of research: As a member of the Pain Lab, it should come as no surprise that I am interested in the psychosocial experience of chronic pain. My masters research looked at biopsychosocial predictors of suicide risk in individuals with inflammatory bowel disease, but my doctoral research takes a different turn. Combining my interests in clinical, health, and organizational psychology, my dissertation research examines how perceptions of workplace relationships affect the experience of occupational stress and workplace withdrawal for individuals with chronic pain. I am excited to see where this research takes me and how it can inform my clinical practice. Though I spend most of my time as a clinical psychology student, I can also be found reading books unrelated to psychology and exploring the southern Ontario music scene.


Julia Moreau

Julia Moreau

MSc Student

Area of Research: My research interests fall in the biopsychosocial sphere of health. Like my fellow graduate students in the Pain Lab, I have focused my attention to explore chronic pain; my masters research utilizes an ideation-to-action framework (i.e., Three- Step Theory) to investigate predictors of suicidal ideation among adolescents living with Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Next fall, I am keen to expand my research to holistic health. As an Indigenous woman positioned in academia, I plan to investigate the resilience of wellbeing of Indigenous students. Apart from being a clinical psychology student, I am also a competitive gymnastics coach, athlete, and dog owner.


Meghan Ford

Meghan Ford

MSc Student

Area of Research: My research interests broadly lie in understanding the individual perspectives and experiences of children living with chronic health conditions. I am committed to including the voices of patients and families throughout the research process from study conceptualization to dissemination of findings. For my master’s thesis, I am examining factors associated with mentee change in a peer-mentorship program for adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). My professional goal is to become a clinical psychologist who engages in clinically informed research and evidence-based practice in order to support children and families.