School of Policy Studies

School of Policy Studies
School of Policy Studies

2018 Queen's International
Institute on Social Policy

2018 Queen's International Institute on Social Policy [image]

Are Canadians ready for the work of the future? Is Canadian social policy? New technologies such as artificial intelligence, advanced robotics and nanotechnology are rapidly altering the skills composition of jobs, prospects for different occupations and the very nature of work itself.  The contours of the future of work are beginning to emerge.  The federal government’s Advisory Council on Economic Growth estimates that by 2030 technological change will displace nearly a quarter of the tasks currently performed by Canadian workers, and that over 10% of workers will lose their jobs (Learning Nation, December 2017).  

Knowledge workers and professionals will not be immune from the transformative impact of these technologies.  But the occupations most at risk are likely those involving routine activities — jobs usually held by relatively low-skilled and low-paid workers. For many, the place and nature of work will also likely change, with the prospect of less job security, lower wages, and less predictable work. On the other hand, some occupations and industries are likely to grow – especially those that engage higher-order cognitive skills, interpersonal skills and comfort with technology. Across the board, one thing is certain -- change will be ubiquitous, putting a premium on all individuals’ adaptability, resilience and ability to reskill across the life course. 

For full conference details and to register, please visit the QIISP page...