Faculty of Arts & Science
A place to learn, discover, think and do.
Languages, Literatures and Cultures at Queen's University

Languages, Literatures & Cultures

Location: 
Kingston Hall
Room number: 
416
Telephone: 
Department Head: 
D.Santeramo

Undergraduate Chair: D. Pugh

The world can seem like a big place, but through LLCU you will get a glimpse into how small and connected it really is. At Queen’s, you can learn over 14 languages through understanding not only the dialectics but the cultures in which they are formed. Learning another language can give you the ability to step inside the mind and context of that other culture – not to mention being much more competitive in the job market. The Department is a vibrant and diverse unit covering Arabic, Chinese, German, Hebrew, Inuktitut, Italian, Japanese, Mohawk, Portuguese, Spanish and Linguistics, with study abroad opportunities such as spending a semester in Spain or Germany for preapproved transfer credits.

Degree Options

Bachelor of Arts (Honours) - BAH

Major in Hispanic Studies or Linguistics
A major is an intensive course of study in one discipline, with approximately half of your courses within the discipline with room for an optional minor in any other Arts and Science discipline.

Medial in German Studies or Hispanic Studies
A dual course of study combined with any other Arts discipline.

Minor in German Studies, Hispanic Studies, Indigenous Studies, Italian Studies, Linguistics, Spanish and Latin American Studies or World Language Studies
A minor is a less intensive course of study in the discipline that must be combined with a major in another discipline.

Bachelor of Arts - BA

General in German Studies, Hispanic Studies, Indigenous Studies, Italian Studies, Linguistics, Spanish and Latin American Studies or World Language Studies
A less intense course of study leading to a 3-year degree.

Full list of Undergraduate Degree Plans at Queen's University

Courses Available to First Year Students 2016-17

Arabic
ARAB100: Intro to Arabic (Modern Standard) (Full-Year)
ARAB200: Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic (Full-Year)

Chinese
CHIN100: Intro Mandarin Chinese I (Full-Year)
CHIN200: Intro Mandarin Chinese II (Full-Year)
CHIN300: Intermediate Mandarin Chinese (Full-Year)

German
GRMN101: Beginner's German I (Fall term; Winter term)
GRMN102: Beginner's German II (Winter term)

Hebrew
HEBR190: Introduction to Modern Hebrew (Full-Year)

Inuktitut
LLCU101: Beginning Language and Culture I (Fall term) SEMINAR 002

Italian
ITLN 111: Beginning Italian I (formerly ITLN P10)(Fall term; Winter term)
ITLN112:  Beginning Italian II (Winter term)

Japanese
JAPN100: Introductory Japanese I (Full-Year)
JAPN200: Introductory Japanese II (Full-Year)

Linguistics
LING100: Intro to Linguistics (Full-Year)
LLCU110: Linguistic Diversity and Identity (Winter term)

LLCU111: Introduction to Cultures (Fall term)

Mohawk
LLCU101: Beginning Language and Culture I (Fall term) SEMINAR 001
LLCU102: Beginning Language and Culture II (Winter term)

Portuguese
PORT103: Beginning Portuguese and Culture I (Fall term)
PORT104: Beginning Portuguese and Culture II (Winter term)

Spanish
SPAN111: Beginning Spanish I (formerly SPAN P10)(Fall term; Winter term)
SPAN112:  Beginning Spanish II (Winter term)

While students may be permitted to take certain language courses concurrently, they will not be allowed to take for credit a language acquisition course with a number lower than that of a course already completed. To ensure that students are properly placed according to their levels of linguistic competence, they will be allowed to change to a more advanced or to a more elementary language course during the first few weeks of term. Students must in any case consult with their instructors before changes are made in registration so that proper placement and progression in course-work may be determined. Students who are unsure of their linguistic level should consult with the Undergraduate Chair.

Students who have little or no knowledge of another language and are interested in pursuing a Plan in that language are encouraged to accelerate their language training by taking two courses in either their first or second year. Students wishing to complete a Medial or Major Plan are strongly encouraged to take advantage of study abroad opportunities.

Students who have completed 4U or equivalent in their language of study will normally begin at the intermediate level while students with native or near-native language proficiency should begin at the advanced level. Students with any previous training in their language of study will not be allowed to take beginning language courses.

What it takes to get into LLCU in your second year >

Click here for the complete list of Courses in Arts and Science

Choosing a Plan in LLCU

Degree OPTIONS

Bachelor of Arts (Honours)

Major in Hispanic Studies or Linguistics
Medial in German Studies or Hispanic Studies
Minor in German Studies, Hispanic Studies, Indigenous Studies, Italian Studies,  Linguistics, Spanish and Latin American Studies or World Language Studies

Bachelor of Arts (General)

German Studies, Hispanic Studies, Indigenous Studies, Italian Studies, Linguistics, Spanish and Latin American Studies or World Language Studies

If you took one of the following courses, you could choose one of the following Plans:

ARAB 100/6.0 → LANG, LING
CHIN 100/6.0 → LANG, LING
GRMN 102/3.0 → GMST, LANG, LING
HEBR 190/6.0 → LANG, LING
ITLN 112/3.0 → ITLN, LANG, LING
JAPN 100/6.0 → LANG, LING
LLCU 102/3.0 Mohawk → INDG, LANG, LING
PORT 104/3.0 → LANG, LING, SLAS
LING 100/6.0 → LING
SPAN 112/3.0 → HISP, LANG, LING, SLAS

GMST: German Studies (Medial, Minor)
HISP:   Hispanic Studies (Major, Medial, Minor)
INDG: Indigenous Studies (Minor)
ITLN: Italian (Minor)
LANG: World Language Studies (Minor)
LING: Linguistics (Major, Minor)
SLAS: Spanish and Latin American Studies (Minor)

Check out the LLCU website for more information

Study Abroad Opportunities in LLCU

Exchange and Study Abroad Opportunities
Students in any LLCU Plan are encouraged to take advantage of the study abroad opportunities or spend their third year abroad. Those wishing to avail themselves of this opportunity should contact the Undergraduate Chair early in their second year of studies in order to discuss course selection and details of transfer credit arrangement. Resources are available in the Department (pamphlets, travel awards) for students to browse.

Job and Career Opportunities for LLCU Grads

The Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures is a multidisciplinary unit that offers students the opportunity to learn languages, develop an understanding of literary and cultural traditions, and pursue studies in the field of Linguistics. Learning a language prepares students to travel, live, or work internationally and makes them more linguistically competent in Canada’s multicultural environment. A degree focusing on languages, literatures and cultures, or Linguistics provides students with valuable transferable skills that are increasingly important in our global world.

Some of our LLCU alumni work in the following professions:

  • Advertising
  • Advocacy - Patient
  • Auctioneering
  • Communications
  • Consumer Services
  • Corrections
  • Editing
  • Education
  • Foreign Affairs & Diplomatic Service
  • Fundraising & Festival Management
  • Immigration Services
  • Insurance
  • Interpretation
  • Journalism
  • Law
  • Librarianship
  • Marketing & Promotions
  • Media – Electronic & Print
  • Museology
  • Public Administration
  • Public Relations
  • Sales - Retail and Wholesale
  • Social Work
  • Speech and Language
  • Therapy
  • Teaching
  • Tourism & Travel
  • Translation

What to do with a languages degree from Queen's handout from Career Services >

LLCU Electives Open to Non-LLCU Students

Queen’s offers 13 languages, 10 of which are offered in the Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures. A language course is a good elective choice for any student in Arts and Science. 

The Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures offers 45 courses in English as Electives Open to Non-LLCU Students on various literature and culture courses: (PLEASE NOTE: not all courses are offered in 2016-17; those that are offered have the appropriate term beside them)

ARAB 100/6.0  Introductory Arabic (Modern Standard)
This is an introductory course in Arabic, for those who have little or no previous experience in the Arabic language.  It may be used as an elective, in a World Language Studies Plan, a Medieval Studies Plan, or in a Global Development Studies Plan.  If you have previous experience in Arabic, you may be able to start at a higher level, and take:

ARAB 200/6.0 Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic
Students need ARAB 100 as a prerequisite to register in ARAB 200/6.0 or obtain permission from the Department.

CHIN 100/6.0 Introductory Mandarin Chinese I
This is an introductory course in Chinese, for those who have little or no previous experience in the Cantonese or Mandarin.  It may be used as an elective, in a World Language Studies Plan, or in a Global Development Studies Plan.  If you have previous experience in Cantonese or Mandarin, you may be able to start at a higher level, and take:

CHIN 200/6.0 Introductory Mandarin Chinese II or CHIN 300/6.0 Intermediate Mandarin Chinese
Students must request permission to register in the upper-year CHIN courses from the Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures.

GRMN 101/3.0 Beginner's German I and GRMN 102/3.0 Beginner's German II
These are courses in German for students who have little or no previous knowledge of the language.   Students who intend to study a German Plan in upper-year should take this course.  They may be used as an elective, in a Global Development Studies Plan, or in a World Languages Plan.  Students who have previous knowledge of German, Grade 12 or equivalent should instead take:

GRMN 201/3.0 and GRMN 202/3.0 (Intermediate German I and II)
Students must request permission to register in GRMN 201/3.0 and GRMN 202/3.0 from the Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures.

HEBR  190/6.0 Introduction to Modern Hebrew and HEBR 191/6.0 Introduction to Biblical Hebrew
These are courses in Modern and Biblical Hebrew, respectively.  They assume little or no previous knowledge of Hebrew.  Students who intend to pursue a Jewish Studies Plan at upper-years should consider one of these courses.  Either may be used towards the requirements of a World Languages Plan, while HEBR 190/6.0 may be used towards a Global Development Studies Plan.  They are good electives for any Arts or Science student.  Students who have previous knowledge of Hebrew should instead take:

HEBR 292/3.0 (Intermediate Biblical Hebrew)
Students must request permission to register in HEBR 292/3.0 from the instructor (W. Morrow, Religious Studies).

HEBR 294/3.0 (Intermediate Modern Hebrew I)
Students must request permission to register in HEBR 294/3.0 from the instructor (N. Haklai, Languages, Literatures and Cultures)

ITLN 111/3.0 (formerly ITLN P10) Beginning Italian I and ITLN 112/3.0 Beginning Italian II
These are courses in Italian for students who have little or no previous knowledge of the language.   Students who intend to study an Italian Plan or pursue a Certificate in Italian language competency in upper-year should take these courses.  They may be used as an elective, in a Global Development Studies Plan, or in a World Languages Plan.  Students who have previous knowledge of Italian, Grade 12 or equivalent should instead take:

ITLN 204/3.0 (Italiano intermedio) and ITLN 205/3.0 (Italiano avanzato)
Students must request permission to register in ITLN 204/3.0 and ITLN 205/3.0 from the Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures.

JAPN 100/6.0 Introductory Japanese I
This is an introductory course in Japanese, for those who have little or no previous experience in the language.  It may be used as an elective, in a World Language Studies Plan, or in a Global Development Studies Plan.  If you have previous experience in Japanese, you may be able to start at a higher level, and take:

JAPN 200/6.0 Introductory Japanese II

LING 100/6.0 Introduction to Linguistics
This course provides an introduction to the linguistic study of language. Topics covered include phonetics, phonology, morphology, and syntax. The course focuses on universal characteristics of language and draws on examples from a variety of languages.

LLCU 101/3.0 and LLCU 102/3.0

Mohawk (Fall 2016:  LLCU 101/3.0 section 001 and Winter 2017: LLCU 102/3.0 section 001)

Inuktitut (Fall 2016:  LLCU 101/3.0 section 002)

Languages on offer may change from year to year. They are taught at the introductory level and LLCU 101/3.0 is the prerequisite for LLCU 102/3.0. When registering in these courses, be sure to check the section you are registering in as this determines the language being taught.

LLCU 110/3.0 Linguistic Diversity & Identity (Winter term)
Explores the diversity of human languages from a linguistic perspective, and the nature of linguistic identity across and within speech communities. Topics include: language families; linguistic typology; writing systems; language endangerment and revitalization; and situations of language contact, bilingualism, and sociolinguistic variation.

LLCU 111/3.0 Introduction to Cultures (Fall term)
Theoretical framework behind the study of Intercultural Communication and proposes practical applications of these theories, including in-class guest speakers and a 4-session workshop on Intercultural Competence by the Queen’s University International Centre (QUIC). Students will obtain a Certificate by QUIC.

LLCU 200/3.0 Semiotics: Interpreting the World (Winter term)
The course promotes the investigation and analyzes of modes of interpretation through cultural lenses. The student will gain knowledge in a wide range of subjects and will recognise the underlining cultural biases, which often occurs, often unconsciously, in interpreting cultural signs. Students will also understand and access how perception is formulated.  Finally, students will develop an understanding of how to detect possible interpretations and over-interpretations of signs. 

LLCU 201/3.0 Introduction to Romance Philology

LLCU 205/3.0 The Cultures of a Nation

LLCU 206/3.0 Rebel Cities

LLCU 207/3.0 Representations of Business in the Movies

LLCU 209/3.0 Rio de Janeiro: the Marvelous City (on-line; Fall term)
This course goes beyond the typical representations of Rio de Janeiro to provide an understanding of the complex social, political, economic, and cultural history that have shaped the city's development and character. Focus is on the twentieth century, but provides the necessary historical background to understand the dynamics of life in Rio.

LLCU 210/3.0 Italy and the Classical Tradition

LLCU 213/3.0 The Social History of Organized Crime in Canada (Winter term)
Analyzes and understand the most important forms of organized crime. Its history and evolution are defined, in an attempt to interpret the relationship between major criminal organizations and economic, social, cultural, political, and demographic changes, both domestically and internationally. 

The course will analyze the connection of criminal organizations to social structures of power and profit, applying categories and models of economic and organizational science.

LLCU 214/3.0 Mafia Culture and the Power of Symbols, Rituals and Myth (Fall term)
Analyzes the cinematic representation of the Mafia and other criminal organizations, such as Yakuza, Triads, Vory V Zakone. The course will focus on how North American cinema (Hollywood) often glorifies the mafiosi's lifestyle. The goal is the deconstruction of the romantic portrayal of the gangster life style created on screen.

LLCU 215/3.0 Dante

LLCU 226/3.0 Italian Literature and Cinema

LLCU 232/3.0 From the Romantics to D'Annunzio

LLCU 233/3.0 Survey of Italian Literature I

LLCU 234/3.0 Survey of Italian Literature II

LLCU 244/3.0 Hips don’t lie?: Music and Culture in Latin America (Winter term)
Explores key aspects of Latin American culture in the twentieth century through the study of its musical production. We will approach notions of race, class, gender, and national identity by focusing on specific musical genres such as Cuban son, Nuyorican salsa, Colombian cumbia and vallenato, Dominican bachata, Mexican corridos, Puerto Rican reggaeton, Andean music, Argentinian tango, afro-Peruvian music, as well as the Nueva Canción, the Latin Pop, and the Rock en Español movements. By the end of the course, students will have a solid grounding in twentieth-century Latin American culture, as well as a deep understanding of some of its most significant musical manifestations. No previous musical training is needed. The course is open to anyone interested in music and/or Latin America in a broad sense.

LLCU 247/3.0 The Dynamic History of Spain (Fall term)
Covers the most significant political, historical, and artistic events and people that have shaped Spanish civilization from prehistoric times to the present. Students will acquire essential knowledge about one of Europe’s most dynamic countries and at the same time improve their analytical, writing, and professional skills.

LLCU 248/3.0 Spanish American Cultural Contexts (Winter term)
Covers a vast area, several cultures, and many centuries. Students are expected to develop a general understanding of Spanish American culture through an examination of important historical, social, political, economic, and artistic developments in the area.

LLCU 249/3.0 Latin Lovers: Love, Sex and Popular Culture (new 2016) (on-line; Winter term)
Explores the emergence, development, and criticism of the Latin Lover figure in the West, from the creation of the archetypical Don Juan in the seventeenth-century to contemporary Hollywood representations of Italian and Latin-American lovers. We will explore notions of masculinity and gender, race and class, and study how the multiple cultural representations of the Don Juan myth —in both literature and film— have preserved or challenged damaging stereotypes of Hispanic and Mediterranean men and women.

LLCU 257/3.0 Pirandello's Theatre  (Fall term)
In-depth study of Pirandello’s most important dramatic works, together with analysis of his theoretical essays on theatre. Particular attention will be paid to the following plays: Six Characters in Search of an Author; Each in his Own Way, Henry IV, The Feast of Our Lord of the Ships, The New Colony; Tonight We Improvise and The Mountain Giants.

LLCU 295/3.0 Special Topics:   Indigenous Digital Media (Winter term)
Explores the relationship between digital media and Indigenous cultures in North America. Digital content — including podcasts, film, music, tweets, and blog posts — will be placed in conversation with media theory and key Indigenous Studies texts in order to draw connections between media production and Indigenous struggles for self-determination. Special attention will be paid to Indigenous cultural resurgence and spaces of (re)conciliation. Over the course of the semester students will be given the tools to thoughtfully and critically engage with Indigenous digital media, and to present their ideas to both academic and community audiences.

LLCU 301/3.0 Oral Tradition and Innovation in Cultural Transmission (Fall term)
An examination of traditional and innovative forms of oral cultural transmission in a selection of American, African and European contexts with particular focus on the interaction of narrative and technology.

LLCU 302/3.0 Unsettling:  Canadian Settler Colonialism and Indigenous (Fall term)
In-depth understanding of relations between settlers and indigenous peoples, with a focus on the traditional territories that have been claimed by the Canadian nation-state. It takes an intersectional and interdisciplinary approach to the analysis of interactions at all levels, from the everyday and interpersonal to the large-scale structures of capitalism, the state form, and politics of identity/recognition. It will be of interest to students who are studying development, social work, technology, education, health, state policy, activism, environmental issues – any of the myriad disciplines and practices where settlers and indigenous peoples meet, where we try to work within, across, and beyond the divide of settler colonialism.

LLCU 308/3.0 From Fellini to Benigni

LLCU 309/3.0 The Films of Pedro Almodóvar

LLCU 316/3.0 Introduction to Contemporary Literary Theory and Analysis (Fall term)
An introduction to contemporary literary theories and the analysis of Hispanic texts from reader-, structural-, and author-oriented perspectives.

LLCU 319/3.0 Roots of Fascism: Resistance to Liberalism in the 19th Century (Fall term)
A survey of various currents of thought from 19th-century Europe that illustrate conservative discomfort with industrial society and help to make the outbreak of fascism understandable after 1918. The course will distinguish between conservative, nationalist, aesthetic, and religious trends, illustrated by relevant readings from different countries.

LLCU 320/3.0 Fascism in Europe from Napoleon to Hitler (Winter term)
An introduction from a cultural perspective to the growth of the fascist mentality in Europe and the emergence of fascist regimes. The course will treat Italian Fascism and the Third Reich as part of the broader conservative and nationalist challenge to liberalism.

LLCU 322/3.0 Conflict and Culture: Literature, Law, and Human Rights (Fall term)
An examination of international discourses on conflict and resolution, including theories of reconciliation, human rights, and international law, as portrayed in various media (fiction, theatre and film) and diverse cultural contexts (e.g. ancient Greece, Germany, South Africa and Canada [indigenous settler relations]).

LLCU 326/3.0 Film in the New Europe

LLCU 333/3.0 Juan Rana:  Baroque Subversion (Winter term)
Juan Rana was the most famous actor of the Spanish Golden Age.  Contemporary playwrights took full advantage of his well-known queerness to subvert implicitly and explicitly the social norms of sexual and gender identity still questioned today. This course will examine the 17th Spanish short theatre in general and historically contextualize its subversion of social, sexual, gender and patriarchal norms.

LLCU 327/3.0 Sickness and Health – Cultural Representations in Medical Discourse 

LLCU 328/3.0 Gender, Development and Film in Latin America (Fall term)
Explores major themes of development in relation to gender in Latin America through its manifestation in film. Films will be chosen from all regions of Latin America, including Brazil.

LLCU 329/3.0 Uncanny Encounters: Narrative Analysis of the Fantastic Genre (Fall term)
An overview of the related genres of the Fantastic, the Fairy Tale, Dystopia, Science Fiction, and Horror. Examples will include popular works such as the Twilight Saga, Harry Potter, and/or The Hunger Games, but also traditional texts by Hoffman and Kafka. Parallel to the fictional works, the course offers theoretical analysis.

LLCU 330/3.0 Cervantes I: Earlier Works

LLCU 331/3.0 Cervantes II: Later Works

LLCU 332/3.0 Spanish Baroque Short Theatre

LLCU 339/3.0 XX-Century Italian Playwrights: In Search of the Theatre

LLCU 340/3.0 European Romanticism

LLCU 432/6.0 Field Research Practicum at Fudan University (Fall term; students participating in the Semester in Shanghai Exchange, International Programs Office)

LLCU 495/3.0 Special Topics I

LLCU 501/3.0 Directed Readings in Languages, Literatures and Cultures

PORT 103/3.0 Beginning Portuguese Language and Culture I (Fall Term)
Introduction to the language and culture of Portugal and Brazil, acquiring basic communicative skills, vocabulary, and structures of the Portuguese language. This course promotes knowledge and understanding of the social, cultural, and historical contexts of both countries.

PORT 104/3.0 Beginning Portuguese Language and Culture II (Winter Term)
Continuation of PORT 103/3.0.

SPAN 111/3.0 (formerly SPAN P10/3.0) Beginning Spanish I  (Fall term; Winter term)

SPAN 112/3.0 Beginning Spanish II (Winter term)
These are courses in Spanish for students who have little or no previous knowledge of the language.   Students who intend to study a Spanish Plan, Spanish and Latin American Studies Plan, or pursue a Certificate in Spanish language competency in upper-year should take these courses.  They may be used as an elective, in a Global Development Studies Plan, or in a World Languages Plan.  Students who have previous knowledge of Spanish, Grade 12 or equivalent should instead take:

SPAN 204/3.0 (Espanol intermedio) (Fall term)

SPAN 205/3.0(Espanol avanzado) (Winter term)
Students must request permission to register in SPAN 204/3.0 and SPAN 205/3.0 from Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures.

*Note: All 6.0 unit courses are multi-term courses.  These courses are offered across the Fall and Winter Terms.  When students enrol in the "A" suffix course in the Fall Term, the "B" suffix will automatically be added to the Winter Term. Both halves of the course will be offered at the same time in the course timetable.

 

 

Certificate of Competence - Languages

Students who are not registered in one of our Degree Plans but have taken certain courses in the language at Queen’s are eligible for a Certificate of Competence in the language. Note that this is not a Senate-approved Certificate Program and therefore will be noted as an Academic Milestone on the transcript. The Certificate will be issued by the Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures on behalf of the Faculty of Arts and Science. Applications for the Certificate should be received by the Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures before the last day of classes. An administrative fee will be charged ($35).

Alumni Profile

Currently working as a team lead in the UBC Research Commons, Jennifer Abel also prides herself on her editing skills developed while she was a student at Queen’s. She has been the technical reviewer for the 5th, 6th and 7th editions of the textbook Contemporary Linguistic Analysis: An Introduction, edited by William O’Grady and John Archibald, published by Pearson Education Canada, as well as the proofreader for the accompanying study guide.

Have Questions?

Call us at 613-533-2470 or email us.

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