StoneHorse Moore Lanʌyakalényese’

Lecturer StoneHorse Moore

Research Interests: Oneida Language and Culture, Haudenosaunee beliefs and Spirituality, Decolonial pedagogy and Indigenous methodologies.

E-mail: sm403@queensu.ca
Office hours: TBA

Education
M. A. Educational Leadership and management -2016 - University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB
B.Ed Consecutive Education – 2013 - Trent University, Peterborough, ON


B. A. Hons. Indigenous Studies – 2012 - Trent University, Peterborough, ON

About
Lanʌyakalényese’ (StoneHorse) Moore is a citizen of the Onʌyote’a·ká of the Thames and is of the Bear Clan, he also has Akimel O’odham heritage and is known as Hodai-Kavyu to his fathers people. StoneHorse grew up in the city of Windsor and was encouraged to learn Oneida by family members. StoneHorse was fortunate to grow up in a time when many resources had been developed to promote learning of the Oneida language through a dictionary, grammar books and the Online resources from the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin. Often in his early childhood and teens he would spend time visiting with his great aunt, uncle and cousins who taught him how to properly speak Oneida and the shortcuts (slang) of the language. His great aunt also taught him to sing several Christian hymns in the Oneida language. StoneHorse took a great interest in learning and preserving the Oneida language when confronted with knowledge of the total number of speakers and the lack of individuals his age capable of speaking Oneida.

StoneHorse first started teaching Oneida in his teens as volunteer work to earn community hours. In 2008 he started his studies at Trent University where he earned his B.A. Honours in Indigenous in 2012. StoneHorse continued to study at Trent to earn his Bachelor of Education.  In 2016 after completing his M.A. at the University of New Brunswick he began teaching the Oneida language with the Greater Essex County District School Board. He continues to teach with the GECDSB in the intermediate and senior levels. StoneHorse’s teaching practice is informed by Oneida/Haudenosaunee cultural practices, longhouse teachings and the core values of the Kayanlʌsla’kó (Great Law).  He strives to always promote a learning environment that is inclusive of all walks of life. His research interest includes Decolonial pedagogy of the education system and integration of Indigenous teaching methodologies.

Teaching

LLCU 101: Beginning Oneida Language and Culture I


LLCU 102: Beginning Oneida Language and Culture II