School of Rehabilitation Therapy Distinguished Alumni Award

The School of Rehabilitation Therapy Distinguished Alumni Award recognizes one graduate annually from each of the Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Rehabilitation Science, and Aging and Health programs who has made exceptional contributions to their chosen profession, field or community.  Recipients are presented with their awards at the School's annual Homecoming Event.

This award was established in 2013, thanks to the generous support of faculty member and Queen’s alumna, Diana Hopkins-Rosseel, MSc’92, and her husband, John Rosseel, BA’81. 

Eligibility:

This award will be presented based on the graduate's exceptional contributions to their chosen profession, field, or community. Recipients will be recognized for their contributions in one of the following areas:

  • Distinguished themselves at home or abroad and made a difference to the well-being of others.
  • Provided leadership and/or advocacy within their chosen profession.
  • Demonstrated an ongoing commitment to the education of rehabilitation students and/or graduates. 
  • Advanced rehabilitation research and/or best practice.
  • Continued involvement with Queen's or the Queen's community. 

2021 Recipient

Alice B. Aiken

  • MSc
    ’00
  • PhD
    ’06

Alice Aiken

2021 Recipient

Carrie Anne Marshall

  • MSc
    ’09
  • PhD
    ’16

Carrie Anne Marshall

2021 Recipient

Marcelle McPhaden

  • PT
    ’85

Marcelle McPhaden

Alice B. Aiken

Dr. Alice Aiken is the Vice-President Research & Innovation at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Canada. Her research focuses on health systems transformation and evidence-informed policy making, with a focus on military and Veteran health. Dr. Aiken is currently the Vice-Chair of the Governing Council of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) and chairs the board of Research Nova Scotia. She is elected to the College of New Scholars, Artists and Scientists of the Royal Society of Canada. 

She started her academic career at Queen’s University where she founded and was the first Scientific Director of the Canadian Institute for Military and Veteran Health Research, a unique consortium of over 46 Canadian and 13 international universities dedicated to researching the health needs of military personnel, Veterans and their families. 

She is currently the Honorary Captain (Navy) for Canadian Forces Health Services Atlantic, and a Dame of the Order of St George. For her commitment to the health and well-being of military personnel, Veterans, and their families, she has received the Canadian Minister of Veterans Affairs Commendation, the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal, and the Chapel of the Four Chaplains Legion of Honor Bronze Medallion (USA).
 

Carrie Anne Marshall

Carrie Anne Marshall is an Assistant Professor in the School of Occupational Therapy, and Director of the Social Justice in Mental Health Research Lab at Western University. Her research focuses on intersections between poverty and mental health, with a particular focus on homelessness. She is also a co-investigator on several projects focused on homelessness and housing that are led by national and international researchers. In all of her work, she is proud to collaborate with individuals with lived experiences of homelessness, service providers, and policymakers from a range of professions in the interest of positive social change.

After earning her Masters of Science in Occupational Therapy in 2009, she worked in community mental health on assertive community treatment teams, the corrections and forensic systems, crisis, and early intervention in psychosis in both Kingston and Brockville. She then decided to return to complete her doctorate in rehabilitation therapy in 2011 during which she focused on the time use of individuals who experience homelessness. During this time, she worked in two Kingston shelters, where she was able to gain insights into the daily life realities of individuals living in housing precarity.  

Marcelle McPhaden

Effective Oct. 18, Marcelle is the new Executive Director of The Transplantation Society (TTS), the international organization dedicated to scientific advancement, knowledge sharing and improving quality, access and ethical practice in organ transplantation.  

McPhaden has over three decades of experience, including working as a physical therapist, as a department leader in hospitals in Ontario and in San Diego, California and as an accreditation expert assessing international health facilities and Canadian health professional training programs, including physical therapy programs.   

She served as the President and CEO of Health Partners International of Canada (HPIC), a charity dedicated to increasing access to medicine and improving health in vulnerable communities around the world. Marcelle also serves on the Board of Directors of Welcome Hall Mission in Montreal, an inner city charity dedicated to eradicating homelessness and on the Board of NOVA Hudson, a community nursing organization.