Kaitie Jourdeuil

Kaitie Jourdeuil

Doctoral Candidate

She/Her

Political Studies

Arts and Science

kaitie.jourdeuil@queensu.ca

@KaitieJourdeuil

Mackintosh-Corry Hall, Room B307

Brief Biography

 

Kaitie Jourdeuil is an SSHRC Doctoral scholar in the Department of Political Studies at Queen’s University, specializing in Political Theory and Canadian Politics. She is broadly interested in the role of political theory as a cultural narrative and how this affects the development of political institutions. Her research centres on the relationship between territorial rights and corrective justice in settler states, with a particular focus on the responsibility of settler states to address Indigenous territorial rights claims as redress for colonial injustices. Her doctoral dissertation argues that the Canadian state has an obligation to recognize Indigenous territorial rights and that Canadian citizens may have a responsibility to incur costs—including the loss of territory—to establish territorial justice. 

Originally from Halifax, Nova Scotia, Kaitie joined the Department of Political Studies in 2019 as a Master’s student. She received her Bachelor of Humanities with High Distinction from Carleton University’s College of the Humanities, during which she completed a year of study at Cardiff University in Wales. 

Selected Awards

  • SSHRC Canada Graduate Scholarship - Doctoral (2021-2024)
  • Graduate Research Fellowship (2020-2021)
  • Ontario Graduate Scholarship (2020-2021)
  • SSHRC Canada Graduate Scholarship – Master’s (2019-2020)
  • Queen’s University Tri-Agency Recipient Recognition Award (2019-2020)
  • Carleton University Senate Medal for Outstanding Academic Achievement (2018)

Teaching Assistantships

2021-2022       POLS 250: History of Political Thought

2021                POLS 320: Indigenous Politics

2020-2021       POLS 250: History of Political Thought

2019-2020       POLS 250: History of Political Thought

Selected Publications

Selected Publications

 

(forthcoming). “A Political Theory of Territory.” In the Springer Encyclopedia of Territorial Rights, edited by Kevin W. Gray and Laura Lo Coco. Dodrecht: Springer, 2022.  

 

Selected Conference Presentations

 

2022. “With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility: An Institutional Role Model for Structural Injustice.” Politics on the Margins: Resisting Current Power Structures Graduate Student Conference, Queen’s University (online).

 

2021. “Embracing the Rupture: Philosophising in the Age of Ambiguity,” (co-authored with Kayla Dold) Continuity or Rupture Graduate Student Conference, Carleton University (online).

Winner: Best Paper and Best Presentation 

2021. “Lost in Translation: Oral History and the Supreme Court of Canada” AEDEEP Graduate Student Conference, University of Ottawa (online).

 

2020. “Whose Land Is It Anyway? Structural Injustice, Attachment, and Territorial Rights.” Robarts Centre for Canadian Studies Graduate Student Conference, York University. (canceled due to COVID-19).

 

2020. “Deconstructing the Canadian Mythos: Theoretical Strategies for Reconciliation.” New Frontiers Graduate Conference, York University.