Bettering the Student Experience for His Peers Earns Law’19 Student Top Queen’s Award

photo of Adam Grotsky
Adam Grotsky, Law’19, who received a top Queen’s University award for community service, says, “Queen’s Law is littered with future leaders of our society – a diverse group of motivated and caring individuals.”
Everyone has a role to play and everyone has something to contribute. You don't need to be president to positively impact the lives of the people around you.

Adam Grotsky, Artsci’16, Law’19, a motivated, diligent Queen’s Law student, has a strong commitment to community service. “I'm inspired by the prospect of improving the lives of the people and communities around me,” he says. That attitude and his resulting actions led to his selection as one of this year’s recipients of The Agnes Benidickson Tricolour Award, the highest tribute paid to a student for valuable and distinguished leadership at Queen’s University.

In his seven years at Queen’s, Grotsky has held several student government positions, including being the Arts and Science Undergraduate Society (ASUS) Academic Affairs Commissioner and the ASUS President in 2014-15, during which he implemented several crucial programs, most notably the Arts and Science Internship Program that provides students with invaluable work experience to complement their in-classroom learning. This past academic year, he was President of the Society of Graduate and Professional Students (SGPS).  

“It was rewarding to play a small part in making the student experience better for my peers,” he says, “Queen’s Law is littered with future leaders of our society – a diverse group of motivated and caring individuals. As president of the SGPS, it was my responsibility to help create an environment that would maximize their success. Whether it was advocating for new study spaces, increasing financial support through new grants and bursaries, expanding mental health coverage under our health plan, or working to combat issues like sexual violence, I hope my fellow law students were better positioned to live and learn as a result.”

Grotsky hopes to continue serving his community in the years to come. “It’s something I've been fortunate to do at Queen's while serving as student government president during my undergrad and then law school,” he says. “This summer, I've been given the opportunity to continue my journey of public service by working at the Department of Justice. The jury is still out on where I'll go from there”

Although Grotsky was honoured at a ceremony in April in Grant Hall, he will not actually receive the award until his Convocation in June 2019.

When asked of his advice to students, Grotsky opines, “Don’t think that your success needs to be similar to someone else’s. Draw your own maps. What I mean when I say that is to find what interests you, where your own passions lie, and once you do, success will come with the territory. Everyone has a role to play and everyone has something to contribute. You don't need to be president to positively impact the lives of the people around you.”

Calling it a “humbling experience to receive the Tricolour Award because of how rich in history it is,” he adds, “What I've enjoyed most is the outpouring of kind words from family, friends, professors and colleagues. I'm fortunate to be surrounded by good people.”

This story originally appeared on the Queen's Law website.