School of Policy Studies

School of Policy Studies
School of Policy Studies

2021 Queen's Institute on Trade Policy

November 15 - 19, 2021    |    Delivered online via Zoom


Theme

The fundamental shifts in the objectives of trade policy in the United States in recent years present both challenges and opportunities for Canada. The challenges are obvious: the Biden administration has embraced and even doubled down on the protectionist turn in US trade policy initiated by the Trump administration. In its attempt to rebuild US economic and technological leadership in competition with China, the administration has so far failed to recognize the potential of regional, rather than national, supply chains, as is evident most clearly in its approach to government procurement. Triangular tensions between China, the European Union, and the United States further complicate the trade policy picture. 

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On the other hand, renewed American willingness to work with allies creates opportunities for Canada in addressing the trade challenges of the 2020s. Canada and the United States have a shared interest not only in the successful implementation of CUSMA, but also in developing international trade rules and policies that help to mitigate the climate crisis, reduce distortions in the global economy, are sensitive to national security concerns, and encourage companies to build resilient supply chains. Both countries are also committed to an inclusive and “worker-centric” trade policy to ensure that the benefits of trade reach all parts of their populations. Finally, both Canada and the United States have resolved to reform the World Trade Organization to make it an effective forum to pursue these goals. Given this broad alignment of interests, a key question for Canadian trade policy is how Canada can best leverage its close political and commercial relationship with its largest trading partner to advance shared priorities.

The 2021 edition of the Institute will enhance participants’ ability to think about Canadian trade policy with both the challenges and the opportunities for cooperation with the United States in mind. A first set of presentations will introduce the subject and provide important context for the current debates. A second set of presentations will provide an overview of the subject matters that are common priorities for Canada and the United States in the coming years, from climate change to digital trade to WTO reform. These presentations will canvas proposals from both countries and probe areas of convergence and divergence. A third set of presentations will survey the avenues through which Canada can work with various stakeholders in the United States in addressing the challenges presented by the current trade landscape.

  • REGISTRATION FEE:  $1,530.00 plus HST per person

Presentations

Day 1

  1. Introduction to the Institute - Nicolas Lamp
    https://prezi.com/view/HQpX9B8vMd1dtzRwpXWg/
     
  2. Overview of the Current Trade Landscape - Stephen Tapp [PDF 1.3MB]
    Article: Superstar Search: Studying the Current and Potential Poplulations of Canadian Exporters and Foreign Direct Investors Abroad - Tapp/Yan [PDF 600 KB]
  3. Economic Doctrine Is in Flux: What are the Implications for Canada’s Regional and Multilateral Trade Engagement? - Dan Ciuriak [PDF 1.6 MB]
    Written copy of Dan Ciuriak's presentation remarks [PDF 636 KB]

  4. China’s Evolving Engagement with the Trading System - Yeling Tan [PDF 1 MB]

 

Day 2

  1. A Firm-Level Perspective on Canada-US Trade - Beverly Lapham [PDF 1.2 MB]

  2. Towards Managed Supply Chains? - Ari Van Assche [PDF 2.8MB]

  3. Elements of a “Worker-Centered” Trade Policy - Kathleen Claussen [PDF 2.5 MB]

 

Day 3

  1. Addressing Distortions in the Global Economy: Industrial Subsidies, State-Owned Enterprises, and Overcapacity - Julia Neilson [PDF 865 KB]
  2. Regional Supply Chains: the Role of Rules of Origin - Andrew (Sandy) Moroz [PDF 275 KB]
     
  3. Prospects for “Buy North American”? The Challenge of Government Procurement - Geneviève Dufour [PDF 659 KB]
     
  4. Best of Frenemies? Towards a Common Agenda in Agriculture - Claire Citeau [PDF 845 KB]

 

Day 4

  1. Data and Digital Services - Mirra Burri [PDF 795 KB]
     
  2. Using Trade Negotiations to Advance Environmental Sustainability: Lessons from the Fisheries Subsidies Negotiations - Alice Tipping [PDF 2.1 MB]
     
  3. Engaging the Private Sector - Matthew Kronby [PDF 332 KB]

 

Day 5

  1. Instrument Choice in Responding to Protectionism - Valerie Hughes [PDF 1.3 MB]
     
  2. Reviving the Negotiating Function in the WTO - Robert Wolfe [PDF 243 KB]
     
  3. Answers to final Small Group Seminar Session - Nicolas Lamp [PDF 56 KB]

Agenda

Expand to view the agenda for this year's Institute on Trade Policy

Monday November 15, 2021
Part I: Introduction and Context
Online Via: Zoom
9:00 Introduction

The presentation will provide an overview of the Institute and introduce the challenges and opportunities presented by Canada’s trade relationship with the United States.

Nicolas Lamp, Director, Queen’s Institute on Trade Policy; Associate Professor, Faculty of Law, Queen’s University

9:45 Overview of the Current Trade Landscape

This presentation will provide an overview of the global state of trade and Canada’s trade performance. It will discuss the most significant economic trends of recent years, including the development of Canada’s trade with the United States, and will explore the prospects for Canada to diversify its trade. 

Stephen Tapp, Chief Economist, Canadian Chamber of Commerce

10:30 Break
10:45

Economic Doctrine Is in Flux: What are the Implications for Canada’s Regional and Multilateral Trade Engagement?

The current opportunities for reengagement with the United States present themselves at a moment of profound changes in economic thinking in the United States and beyond. The renewed interest in industrial policy, spurred both by the experience of the COVID-19 pandemic and the geopolitical competition with China, the return of shortages and inflationary pressures, the revival of antitrust policy, and the emerging dynamics of the data-driven economy have broad implications for trade policy.    

Dan Ciuriak, Senior Fellow, Centre for International Governance Innovation; former Deputy Chief Economist, Global Affairs Canada

11:30 

Lunch Keynote: China’s Evolving Engagement with the Trading System

Yeling Tan, Assistant Professor, Political Science, University of Oregon

12:30 End of Day

Tuesday November 16, 2021
Online Via: Zoom
9:00

A Firm-Level Perspective on Canada-US Trade

Resource reallocation within industries and its impact on firm, industry, and national productivity is a key component of Canada-US trade. This presentation examines developments in firm-based trade theory and empirics which focus on within industry adjustments and the resulting trade policy implications emanating from such models.  These firm-level approaches have changed our understanding of the differential impacts of trade on firms of differing sizes and maturities, particularly on small and medium enterprises (SMEs).  Hence, the presentation will highlight the challenges that smaller firms, including those led by underrepresented groups, face in participating in international trade.

Beverly Lapham, Professor, Economics Department, Queen’s University

9:45 Towards Managed Supply Chains?

The COVID-19 pandemic and the increased political conflict and economic competition between the United States and China have created renewed interest among governments in managing supply chains. This presentation will explore the tools that governments use to manage supply chains and the impact on companies’ sourcing and investment decisions that government interventions tend to have.

Ari Van Assche, Professor, HEC Montreal

10:30 Small Group Seminar I on Context and Background (60 minutes)
11:30 Break
 

Part II: Areas of Shared Interest

11:45

Elements of a “Worker-Centered” Trade Policy

A key feature of the Biden Administration’s trade policy is its focus on workers.  The Biden Administration is taking concrete steps to put this approach into action, including by finding new ways to include worker representatives in the process of trade policy formulation, by submitting labour-relevant proposals in the WTO, and by employing the Rapid-Response Mechanism in the CUSMA to address alleged violations of labour rights in factories in Mexico. The presentation will examine the many facets of the U.S. worker-centered trade policy and how it is affecting US trading partners and other stakeholders. 

Kathleen Claussen, Associate Professor, University of Miami School of Law

12:30 

Lunch Keynote: The View from Washington

Rufus Yerxa, former President, National Foreign Trade Council; former Deputy-Director General, World Trade Organization

1:30 End of Day

Wednesday November 17, 2021
Online Via: Zoom
9:00

Addressing Distortions in the Global Economy: Industrial Subsidies, State-Owned Enterprises, and Overcapacity

China’s allegedly trade-distorting practices have been a central point of contention in the US-China trade war, prompting proposals to reform subsidy rules and tighten restrictions on state-owned enterprises to discipline China’s model of state capitalism more effectively. Overcapacity in sectors like steel has also had knock-on effects on trade relations between the United States and its allies, leading to the increased use of safeguards, tariffs, and voluntary export restraints. The presentation will survey the discussions taking place in various fora to reduce distortions in the world economy.  

Julia Nielson, Deputy Director, Trade and Agriculture Directorate, OECD

9:45 Regional Supply Chains: the Role of Rules of Origin

Market access barriers play a diminishing role in managing international trade flows, particularly due to the increasing number of preferential trade agreements which typically result in the complete elimination of tariffs among the participating countries. The question of when companies can take advantage of the preferential market access provided by these agreements thus assumes outsize importance. The answer to these question lies in the rules of origin that govern access to the preferential market access. Rules of origin are increasingly being used not just to internalize the benefits of the agreement among the participants, but also to achieve other policy objectives, such as increased wages.

Andrew (Sandy) Moroz

10:30 Small Group Seminar II on Areas of Shared Interest (75 minutes)
11:45 Break
12:00 Prospects for “Buy North American”? The Challenge of Government Procurement

Along with subsidies and rules of origin, government procurement is one of the principal tools that governments have at their disposal to shape markets and support particular industries and producers. In the United States, there is an increasing bipartisan consensus to use government procurement in this way. The presentation will provide an overview of the politics of “Buy America/Buy American” and discuss how trade officials can help Canadian companies maintain access to the most important procurement market in the world economy.

Genevieve Dufour, Professor, Faculty of Law, Université de Sherbrooke

12:45 

Best of Frenemies? Towards a Common Agenda in Agriculture

Disputes about agricultural trade between the United States and Canada often make headlines. At the same time, Canada and the United States have very well-aligned food systems and regulatory approaches and work closely together on promoting the interests of their agricultural producers internationally. The presentation will chart both areas of conflict and convergence between Canada and the United States in agricultural trade.

Claire Citeau, Executive Director, Canadian Agri-Food Trade Alliance

1:30 End of Day

Thursday November 18, 2021
Online Via: Zoom
9:00

Data and Digital Services

The transition to the data-driven economy and the increased importance of digital technologies in the global economy present numerous challenges for trade officials. The presentation will examine how these challenges are currently being addressed in the negotiations on e-commerce in the WTO and in rules regarding the cross-border transfer of data that are implemented through preferential trade agreements. Alongside economic interests and privacy concerns, national security considerations are playing an ever more prominent role in the regulation of the digital economy.

Mira Burri, Senior Lecturer, Faculty of Law, University of Lucerne

9:45

Using Trade Negotiations to Advance Environmental Sustainability: Lessons from the Fisheries Subsidies Negotiations

The negotiations on fisheries subsidies at the World Trade Organization are the first negotiation in the multilateral trade regime that is primarily motivated by an environmental objective. As such, it is an important test case for whether the WTO can contribute to addressing the pressing environmental challenges of the 21st century. The presentation will provide an update on the negotiations and highlight key obstacles to a successful conclusion at the WTO’s 12th Ministerial Conference.

Alice Tipping, Lead, Sustainable Trade and Fisheries Subsidies, International Institute for Sustainable Development

10:30

Small Group Seminar III on Areas of Shared Interest (60 minutes)

11:30  Break
11:45

Border Carbon Adjustments

Climate change is the greatest policy challenge of our time and will likely play an ever more important role in the development of trade policy. Border carbon adjustments can play an important role in addressing concerns about carbon leakage and thereby reconciling an ambitious climate policy with concerns about international competitiveness. The European Union is the first of Canada’s trading partners to roll out a border carbon adjustment mechanism, and the Canadian government is engaged in consultations on developing its own version. The presentation will introduce participants to the European Union’s mechanisms and discuss Canada’s policy options.  

Aaron Cosbey, Senior Associate, International Institute for Sustainable Development

 

  Part III: Instruments and Strategies
12:30 

Engaging the Private Sector

Discussions of trade policy often focus on major trends and new developments. But what are the problems that Canadian traders most often confront in shipping their goods and services across borders? What are the nuts and bolts of trading that Canadian trade officials should know about? How do Canadian businesses perceive Canada’s trade policy? And how can Canadian trade officials engage the private sector most effectively? The presentation will provide insights into these questions from the perspective of a law firm advising Canadian businesses.

Matthew Kronby, Partner, Borden Ladner Gervais

1:30 End of Day

Friday November 19, 2021
Online Via: Zoom
9:00

Instrument Choice in Responding to Protectionism

The US boycott of appointments to the WTO Appellate Body has made it possible for WTO Members to sabotage the WTO dispute settlement process. As a result, Canada will need to look to other avenues to enforce its rights under international trade agreements, including committee processes and arbitration procedures in the WTO and dispute settlement procedures under preferential trade agreements. The presentation will lay out the options available to Canadian trade officials and discuss their advantages and drawbacks.   

Valerie Hughes, Senior Counsel, Bennett Jones

9:45

Reviving the Negotiating Function in the WTO

The collapse of the Doha Development Agenda in the WTO appeared to have brought the long series of comprehensive “rounds” of negotiations to an end. The so-called Joint Statement Initiatives (JSIs) through which groups of Members attempt to negotiate new rules in areas of interest to them are an attempt to get around the consensus problem, but package deals and major power leadership are still needed. The presentation will introduce the participants to the dynamics of the JSIs and explore their implications for a broader revival of the WTO’s negotiating function.

Robert Wolfe, Professor Emeritus, School of Policy Studies, Queen’s University

10:30 Break
10:45

Keynote: The Multiple Dimensions of a Negotiating Strategy vis-à-vis the United States

John Layton, Minister (Economics), Embassy of Canada to the United States

11:45  Small Group Seminar IV on Instruments and Strategies (60 minutes)
12:45
 

Presentation by Senior Officials

The concluding session will provide an opportunity for an exchange of views with senior officials on trade cooperation between Canada and the United States.

Arun Alexander, Director General, North America Trade Policy Bureau
Kendal Hembroff, Director General, Trade Negotiations, Global Affairs Canada

1:30 Institute Ends

Background Readings

Monday, November 15

Part I: Introduction and Context

Overview of the Current Trade Landscape
Stephen Tapp, Chief Economist, Canadian Chamber of Commerce

Economic Doctrine Is in Flux: What are the Implications for Canada’s Regional and Multilateral Trade Engagement?
Dan Ciuriak, Senior Fellow, Centre for International Governance Innovation; former Deputy Chief Economist, Global Affairs Canada

Lunch Keynote: China’s Evolving Engagement with the Trading System
Yeling Tan, Assistant Professor, Political Science, University of Oregon

Tuesday, November 16

A Firm-Level Perspective on Canada-US Trade
Beverly Lapham, Professor, Economics Department, Queen’s University

Towards Managed Supply Chains?
Ari Van Assche, Professor, HEC Montreal

Part II: Areas of Shared Interest

Elements of a “Worker-Centered” Trade Policy
Kathleen Claussen, Associate Professor, University of Miami School of Law

Wednesday, November 17

Prospects for “Buy North American”? The Challenge of Government Procurement
Genevieve Dufour, Professor, Faculty of Law, Université de Sherbrooke

Thursday, November 18

Data and Digital Services
Mira Burri, Senior Lecturer, Faculty of Law, University of Lucerne

Using Trade Negotiations to Advance Environmental Sustainability: Lessons from the Fisheries Subsidies Negotiations
Alice Tipping, Lead, Sustainable Trade and Fisheries Subsidies, International Institute for Sustainable Development

Border Carbon Adjustments
Aaron Cosbey, Senior Associate, International Institute for Sustainable Development

Friday, November 19

Part III: Instruments and Strategies

Instrument Choice in Responding to Protectionism
Valerie Hughes, Senior Counsel, Bennett Jones

Recommended:

Additional reading:

 

LEGAL PROVISIONS

Recommended:

WTO Dispute Settlement Understanding, especially Article 25

MPIA

CUSMA Chapter 31, Dispute Settlement

Additional reading:

CETA Chapter 29, Dispute Settlement

CPTPP Chapter 28, Dispute Settlement

Reviving the Negotiating Function in the WTO
Robert Wolfe, Professor Emeritus, School of Policy Studies, Queen’s University

 


PAST INSTITUTES

2020

2020Queen's Institute on Trade Policy: Trade Rules for the Pandemic and Its Aftermath  - Nov 23 - 27, 2020 [image]

November 23 - 27, 2020

read the agenda for this event. [image]   


Theme

The pandemic caused by the novel coronavirus will shape the economic policy landscape for the foreseeable future. Governments around the world have taken action on an unprecedented scale to stop the spread of the virus, ensure the availability of essential supplies, and help firms and their workers survive the shutdown of large sections of the economy. This year’s Institute on Trade Policy will cover the immediate tasks for trade policy presented by the emergency, the long-term trends that the pandemic has unleashed or accelerated, and the tools that trade officials have at their disposal to respond to and shape these developments. 

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The months following the outbreak of the novel coronavirus saw a proliferation of export restrictions on medical goods. Government restrictions on economic activity also had a large indirect impact on international trade: international travel slowed to a trickle as borders were closed and hundreds of millions of tourists, international students, and business travelers were forced to stay put. These restrictions have not only made some forms of trade impossible, but also increased the general cost of conducting trade in both goods and services. At the same time, governments have poured vast amounts of funds into the economy to keep businesses afloat. These developments present immediate tasks for trade officials, most prominently to monitor and—responsibly—roll back restrictions and financial emergency assistance that may have trade-distortive effects.

The pandemic also affects the existing agenda. Digital trade is rising in importance as ever more economic activity moves online—a trend that accentuates the need for new rules on e-commerce and the cross-border transfer of data. The global race to develop a vaccine for the coronavirus will increase scrutiny of intellectual property protections in trade agreements, as governments consider the need for compulsory licensing not only for their own markets, but also to export to countries without pharmaceutical manufacturing capacity. And the increased emphasis on the “resilience” of supply chains and demands to ensure domestic capacity to produce “essential goods” could portend greater government involvement in the economy. Renewed interest in resilience will put rules on subsidies and government procurement into the spotlight. Finally, the economic changes wrought by the pandemic will interact in myriad ways with the climate crisis.  

The 2020 edition of the Institute will prepare participants to address these challenge. A first set of presentations will outline the evidence on the trade-implications of the pandemic as well as the pandemic’s impact on long-run trends. A second set of presentations will examine how existing trade rules have fared in the response to the crisis and whether there is a need for reform. A third set of presentations will explore how trade officials can build an international trade regime that can accommodate and shape the long-run trends of digitization, increased state involvement in the economy, and climate change.

Presentations

Monday November 23, 2020

Expand to view a list of presentations...

Nicolas Lamp
Introduction to the Institute [PDF 3.2 MB]

Stephen Tap
Overview of the Current Trade Landscape  [PDF 2.1 MB]

Simon Evenett
Anatomy of the Trade Restrictions in the Wake of the Pandemic [PDF 1.2 MB)​ 

Sébastien Miroudot
What Makes a Supply Chain Resilient? [PDF 442 KB] 

Tuesday November 24, 2020

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Wednesday November 25, 2020

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Thursday November 26, 2020

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Friday November 27, 2020

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Trevor Tombe
The Canadian Free Trade Agreement and Interprovincial Trade [PDF 720 KB]​

Don Stephenson
The Trade policy analyst [PDF 464 KB]​

Nicolas Lamp
Answers to Small Group Seminar Questions [PDF 50 KB]​

 

2019

2019 Queen's Institute on Trade Policy: What’s Next for Rules-Based Trade Cooperation? - Nov 17 - 19, 2019 [image]

Room 202 Robert Sutherland Hall, Queen's University
138 Union Street, Kingston, ON

November 17 - 19, 2019

agenda 


Theme

Canada can look back on an extraordinarily productive period of trade negotiations, which has yielded the CETA with the European Union, the CPTPP with 10 countries in the Pacific region, and the CUSMA with the United States and Mexico. At the same time, the need to adapt to tectonic shifts in the global economy poses continuing challenges: the rapid advance of digital technology has the potential to vastly increase the scope of “tradable” tasks and will for the first time expose many of the service sector jobs that form the backbone of Canada’s economy to foreign competition. This development lends additional urgency to the Canadian government’s commitment to ensure that all Canadians share in the benefits of trade. Canada also needs to find a way to take advantage of the shift of the world economy’s centre of gravity towards Asia, without getting further embroiled in the escalating economic and technological competition between the United States and China. Finally, Canada faces the task of deepening cooperation under its existing agreements and to ensure that these agreements yield benefits for all Canadians. This could involve increased regulatory cooperation inside and outside the WTO, as well as better use of available committees and review mechanisms to monitor compliance with commitments.  

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As Canada attempts to grapple with these challenges, the legal regimes on which it has traditionally relied for rules-based trade cooperation are under increasing strain. While Canada has successfully fended off attempts by the United States to roll back trade liberalization in the bilateral relationship, the multilateral trade regime finds itself in increasingly dire straits, as the Appellate Body will become dysfunctional towards the end of 2019 and the system grapples with an unprecedented willingness of some WTO Members to invoke national security exceptions or to act completely outside the WTO’s remit. Canada has taken an active role in developing solutions to the current crisis by assembling a coalition of like-minded countries – the Ottawa Group – and by advancing proposals to reinvigorate the WTO, which remains the bedrock of Canada’s trade policy and its main forum for formal dispute settlement, including with the United States.

The 2019 edition of the Institute will prepare participants to address these challenges for rules-based trade cooperation. The Institute will be structured around three pillars that take up each challenge in turn. A first set of presentations will explore the broad trends that have led to the current crisis of the trade regime and will explore their ramifications for negotiating formats and the design of dispute resolution mechanisms. A second set of presentations will delve into the elements of a negotiating agenda that can meet the challenges of digitisation, the rise of Asia, and the resulting opportunities for trade diversification and for more inclusive trade. A final set of presentations will explore the mechanisms for enhancing trade cooperation under existing agreements. How can the Canadian government engage businesses more effectively to ensure that they can take full advantage of the market access provided by Canada’s new trade agreements? How can Canada make use of the existing mechanisms to strengthen regulatory cooperation? Can Canada do a better job of using the WTO’s committees and other transparency mechanisms to advance its trade agenda?

Presentations

Sunday November 17, 2019

Expand to view a list of presentations...

Nicolas Lamp
Introduction to the Institute (Prezi Presentation)

Stephen Tap
Overview of the Current Trade Landscape (4.5 MB)​ 

Simon Evenett
Anatomy of the Breakdown in Trade Cooperation (3.8 MB)​ 

Banquet Keynote:

Douglas Irwin
A Long View of the Current Moment in U.S. Trade Policy (4.7 MB)​ 

Monday November 18, 2019

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Tuesday November 19, 2019

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2018

 

Queen's Institute on Trade Policy:

Trade Negotiations in and Era of Uncertainty

October 21 - 23 2018

Room 202 Robert Sutherland Hall, Queen's University
138 Union Street, Kingston, ON

view the agenda [button image]


Theme

Canadian trade and negotiation strategy is now shaped by an environment in which we cannot assume that all our partners always share trade liberalization objectives or support the rules-based trading system. High profile protectionist actions seem increasingly legitimate in some countries, but routine protectionism never went away in many more. The potential direct and global ripple effects of a U.S. retreat from multilateralism bring considerable risk for Canadians, not least by undermining what we thought were the foundational norms of trade relations. The old assumptions about integrative negotiations and a deliberative process in the search for mutual gains are challenged by positional bargaining aimed at narrow bilateral bargains. At the same time, some citizens in the advanced economies think that trade and globalization have not worked for them. Developing a progressive trade agenda in support of inclusive growth will require expanding trading opportunities to reach and benefit broader groups who previously have not been the focus of trade policy, including women.

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All countries have domestic sensitivities. Canadians defend our supply management system, maintain a low de minimis limit for parcel shipments, make sophisticated use of trade remedies, wall off health services and culture from foreign participation, and accept managed trade in softwood lumber with the USA. But the general direction of Canadian trade negotiation strategy has been towards more open markets within a multilateral trading system as the basis of Canadian prosperity. This year’s Trade Institute focuses on the strategic challenges Canada faces in a world adapting to rapid structural change and increased protectionism, unilateralism and uncertainty. How should Canadian officials analyze the country’s interests? How can they protect those interests from protectionist actions taken by others, while at the same time advancing them in the context of new negotiations? If comprehensive agreements appear unattainable, could, for example, an accord on e-commerce be incorporated in a memorandum of understanding or in a plurilateral agreement in the WTO?

Drawing on the experience of former negotiators and academic trade experts, the training objective for the Institute is to help a new generation of federal, provincial and territorial trade policy practitioners to acquire the skills and perspectives needed to develop trade negotiation strategies, and to provide networking opportunities with their counterparts in other departments and other levels of government. The Institute is designed for officers who already have considerable experience with the basics of trade policy and negotiations. The breakout sessions will be organized to allow more experienced participants to delve more deeply among themselves on issues arising from the presentations while enabling participants newer to trade policy to consolidate what they have learned in separate sessions

2017

Queen's Institute on Trade Policy

Towards a new model for North American economic integration

October 15 - 17, 2017

Agenda Button [image] 


Theme

Canada is at a risky crossroads in its commercial policy. The prosperity and growth of its small open economy depend on international trade and investment, but we face unprecedented challenges with a new American President who decided to abandon the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and renegotiate, or “modernize”, the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) in order to put Americans first. The potential global ripple effects of a U.S. retreat from a rules-based trading system bring considerable risk for Canadians. At the same time, some citizens in the advanced economies think that trade has not worked for them. Developing an inclusive or progressive trade agenda will require expanding trading opportunities to reach and benefit broader groups who previously have not been the focus of trade policy. .

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Economic relations with the U.S. have been at the centre of Canadian economic policy since before Confederation. A predominant, perennial objective for Canadian trade policy should be to maintain access to the (North) American market and to US-centered supply chains that is as good as or better than any other country. Part of the School of Policy Studies Public Policy & Canada’s 150 initiative, this year’s trade institute focuses on key challenges Canada faces in the NAFTA renegotiations. Will it create a new model for North American economic integration, or undermine the basis of Canadian prosperity? How should Canadian officials analyze the country’s interests? Drawing on the experience of former negotiators and academic trade experts, the training objective for the Institute is to help a new generation of federal, provincial and territorial trade policy practitioners to acquire the skills and perspectives needed to develop trade negotiation strategies, and to provide networking opportunities with their counterparts in other departments and levels of government. The Institute is designed for officers who already have considerable experience with the basics of trade policy and negotiations. The breakout sessions will be organized to allow more experienced participants to go deeper among themselves on issues arising from the presentations while enabling participants newer to trade policy to consolidate what they have learned in separate sessions. Background reading material will be available on a special web page for participants in advance.

2017 Presentations

Expand to view and download the presentations from this years program

Day 1

Day 2

Day 3