Courses

Cultural Studies Courses 2021-2022

Cultural Studies MA and PhD students must take "CUST 802/902 Cultural Studies Colloquium" plus four other courses.  Students are required to complete at least two courses in CUST, one of which must be CUST 803 (Cultural Studies Past & Present).  Remaining courses may be chosen from CUST or selected from elective courses offered by other departments.  All courses are generally completed during the first year of study.

Please note that graduate courses are often timetabled in June and this page will be updated as information becomes available to us.  Class times and locations will also be made available by the department where the courses is offered - please be sure to check the graduate section of their website.

Cultural Studies Courses

CUST 802/902 Cultural Studies Colloquium (6.0 Units).  Required Course.
Jeff Brison
Wednesday, 11:30-2:30 (remote)

This course is designed to acquaint graduate students with both current work in the field and various forms of professionalization, through a combination of research presentations and participatory workshops. Students are expected to attend regularly and complete some reflective writing activities. Grading is on a Pass/Fail basis.

CUST 803 Cultural Studies Past & Present (3.0 Units).  Required Course.
Section 1: Thursday, 11:30-2:30 (remote)

Scott Rutherford
OR
Section 2: Monday, 11:30-2:30, A416 Mac-Corry Hall
burcu baba
This course introduces students to the global and interdisciplinary scope of Cultural Studies research practices by surveying key debates, concerns, and texts that have shaped the field over time.

CUST 804 Community-Based Research (3.0 Units)
Ayca Tomac
Tuesday, 11:30-2:30, C416 Mac-Corry Hall
TBC As cultural producers, activists, and/or researches, Cultural Studies students interact with various communities within, beyond, and on the margins of the academy. This course engages with the theoretical, political, practical, personal, and institutional challenges and opportunities of community-based research.

CUST 805 Research Creation (3.0 Units)
Dolleen Manning
Tuesday, 2:30-5:30pm (remote)
This course is designed to support students whose intellectual approach combines creative and academic research practices. The course will value the development of knowledge and innovation through artistic practice, scholarly investigation, and experimentation. Please note that this course is offered primarily as a methods course for Research-Creation practitioners and the main method of evaluation is production of R-C work.

CUST 802/902 Cultural Studies Colloquium (6.0 Units).  Required Course.
Jeff Brison
Wednesday, 11:30-2:30 (remote)

This course is designed to acquaint graduate students with both current work in the field and various forms of professionalization, through a combination of research presentations and participatory workshops. Students are expected to attend regularly and complete some reflective writing activities. Grading is on a Pass/Fail basis.

CUST 800 Cultural Studies Theory (3.0 Units) 
Ali Na
Monday, 8:30-11:30, C416 Mac-Corry Hall

This course unpacks and explores key theories and philosophies relevant to cultural studies, with a focus on critical cultural and minoritarian perspectives. The course will weave between contemporary works and influential intellectual histories. We will practice interpreting dense theoretical works while also engaging how these ideas have been institutionalized and to what effects. The course will engage generously with an openness to what the concepts and texts might do and have offered as well as confront the afterlives of theory and criticism, which often include omissions, erasures, and modes of subordination. Concepts covered include capitalist critique, hegemony, race, feminisms, queerness, madness, post/decoloniality, archives, and intersectionality.

​CUST 807 Settler Colonialism and Incarceration (3.0 Units)
Lisa Guenther
Tuesday, 2:30-5:30, 401 Watson Hall

Current scholarship on prison abolition tends to focus on the relation between slavery and mass incarceration, but it’s not clear how this framework helps to address the hyper-incarceration of Indigenous peoples in Canada and other settler colonial states. In this seminar, we will study abolitionist (and) decolonial movements with the aim of recovering and co-creating methods for dismantling carceral-colonial institutions and building freer, healthier, and more just communities. Throughout the semester, we will reflect on the map as both a colonial instrument of domination and a creative tool for navigating oppressive structures and sketching concrete alternatives to the world that slavery and colonialism has built. We will also activate our collective power to dream, not as an escapist fantasy but as a critical research method that moves beyond an analysis of what is wrong with the world to experiment with ways of making it better. Readings will include work by Saidiya Hartman, Nick Estes, Robin Kelley, Dionne Brand, and Leanne Simpson.

CUST 892 Special Topics Course: McWorld in the Making: Capitalism, Consumerism, and the Commodification of Everything (3.0 Units)
Ariel Salzmann and Ayca Tomac
Monday, 2:30-5:30, C420 Mac-Corry Hall

In 1990 Barbara Kruger, translated René Descartes epistemological (and ontological) founding principle into a neoliberalism conceptual slogan: “I shop therefore I am.” Capitalism’s fantasy of unlimited growth and ideology of private accumulation has yielded a planet of unparalleled extremes of excess, waste, and want, teetering on the edge of mass extinction. Multi-disciplinary studies have documented the sociology, culture, politics, symbolism, economic and ecological consequences of rampant consumerism and metastatic commodification on, among many other topics, social relationships, artistic expression, health, work, ethics, emotions and the environment. Departing from readings of some of the classic works on commodities and consumerism (Marx, Veblen, Sombart, Baudrillard, Harvey) and key analysis of the imperialist structures upon which modern mass consumerism continues to rely (Mintz, Patel-Moore) the course explores cases studies of commodification and consumption from the perspective of history, anthropology, sociology, and the arts.

CUST-850 Capstone Project (6.0 units)
Laura Murray
Date and Time are TBC

In this workshop course, students will substantially revise or transform work from a previous Queen’s graduate course with the goal of publication or other dissemination, and produce a reflection on professional development activities pursued throughout the year.

CUST 894 Directed Community-Based Practicum
This course is intended to support a student's MA or PhD research through organizational and social experience gained from involvement with relevant off-campus institutions, organizations, and community groups. A CS faculty member will oversee each placement in collaboration with a member of the relevant organization or group.  Please note that practicum courses must be arranged well in advance: do not wait until September.

CUST 895 Agnes Etherington Practicum
Alicia Boutilier (Chief Curator/Curator of Canadian Historical Art, Agnes Etherington Art Centre)
This applied research internship in a professional art museum cultivates understanding of the capacity and disciplinary protocols surrounding research and public presentation of critical cultures within an institutional framework. The focus of the course is a defined research project developed in consultation with the supervising curator and contributing to the Art Centre’s exhibition program or collection development. Practicum students work on-site at the Art Centre 10 hours per week, with additional research hours required. For information on the curatorial direction of our contemporary art program, please refer to the gallery website. Graduate students with relevant education and/or experience in visual and media art or art history in the Cultural Studies Programs at a Masters or Doctoral level are eligible to apply. Those interested should submit a letter of intent describing their goals and areas of interest, a CV and a transcript of their academic record. Admission will be based on interviews, and is contingent on identification of a research project aligned with student research interests and evolving gallery needs. Applications should be submitted well in advance of the desired semester, usually at the beginning of the previous semester to allow for planning. Practica may take place in the fall, winter or spring/summer semester.​  Please note that practicum courses must be arranged well in advance: do not wait until September.

Under the supervision of an individual faculty member, students may conduct intensive reading in a research area not offered in core or elective courses. Readings are to be arranged in consultation with the faculty supervisor, and accompanied by meetings during the term to discuss the readings and submission of written assignments. (This course will be offered when faculty resources are available.)

CUST 990 Directed Studies I
​CUST 991 Directed Studies II
CUST 890 Directed Studies I
CUST 891 Directed Studies II

Cultural Studies micro-courses devote 12 hours to exploring a particular method, moment, or phenomenon and are designed to help students extend theory to current issues, build scholarship, connect research with practice, and gather new tools. The courses are delivered in a condensed format and will be counted as a 1.0 unit course. Micro-courses are graded as pass/fail. For full time graduate students, there is no additional cost to take any of these courses. 


CUST 815 Skilling It

This course offers specialized in-depth instruction in topics related to Cultural Studies Methodology.

Not offered in 2020-2021


CUST 816 Up Close

This course offers intensive consideration of a major book or work in any medium.

Not offered in 2020-2021


CUST 817 Signs of the Times

This course offers intensive consideration of an issue or event of contemporary social, political and cultural relevance.

Not offered in 2020-2021

CUST 802/902 Cultural Studies Colloquium (6.0 Units).  Required Course.
Jeff Brison
Date and time TBA

This course is designed to acquaint graduate students with both current work in the field and various forms of professionalization, through a combination of research presentations and participatory workshops. Students are expected to attend regularly and complete some reflective writing activities. Grading is on a Pass/Fail basis.

CUST 803 Cultural Studies Past & Present (3.0 Units).  Required Course.
Date and time TBA

burcu baba
This course introduces students to the global and interdisciplinary scope of Cultural Studies research practices by surveying key debates, concerns, and texts that have shaped the field over time.

CUST 805 Research Creation (3.0 Units)
Dolleen Manning
Date and time TBA
This course is designed to support students whose intellectual approach combines creative and academic research practices. The course will value the development of knowledge and innovation through artistic practice, scholarly investigation, and experimentation. Please note that this course is offered primarily as a methods course for Research-Creation practitioners and the main method of evaluation is production of R-C work.

CUST 806 Indigenous Special Topics (3.0 Units)
Celeste Pedri-Spade
Date and time TBA
 

​CUST 807 Settler Colonialism and Incarceration (3.0 Units)
Lisa Guenther
Date and time TBA

Current scholarship on prison abolition tends to focus on the relation between slavery and mass incarceration, but it’s not clear how this framework helps to address the hyper-incarceration of Indigenous peoples in Canada and other settler colonial states. In this seminar, we will study abolitionist (and) decolonial movements with the aim of recovering and co-creating methods for dismantling carceral-colonial institutions and building freer, healthier, and more just communities. Throughout the semester, we will reflect on the map as both a colonial instrument of domination and a creative tool for navigating oppressive structures and sketching concrete alternatives to the world that slavery and colonialism has built. We will also activate our collective power to dream, not as an escapist fantasy but as a critical research method that moves beyond an analysis of what is wrong with the world to experiment with ways of making it better. Readings will include work by Saidiya Hartman, Nick Estes, Robin Kelley, Dionne Brand, and Leanne Simpson.

CUST 802/902 Cultural Studies Colloquium (6.0 Units).  Required Course.
Jeff Brison
Date and time TBA

This course is designed to acquaint graduate students with both current work in the field and various forms of professionalization, through a combination of research presentations and participatory workshops. Students are expected to attend regularly and complete some reflective writing activities. Grading is on a Pass/Fail basis.

CUST 800 Cultural Studies Theory (3.0 Units) 
Ali Na
Date and time TBA

This course unpacks and explores key theories and philosophies relevant to cultural studies, with a focus on critical cultural and minoritarian perspectives. The course will weave between contemporary works and influential intellectual histories. We will practice interpreting dense theoretical works while also engaging how these ideas have been institutionalized and to what effects. The course will engage generously with an openness to what the concepts and texts might do and have offered as well as confront the afterlives of theory and criticism, which often include omissions, erasures, and modes of subordination. Concepts covered include capitalist critique, hegemony, race, feminisms, queerness, madness, post/decoloniality, archives, and intersectionality.

CUST 804 Community-Based Research (3.0 Units)
Reena Kukreja
Date and time TBA
TBC As cultural producers, activists, and/or researches, Cultural Studies students interact with various communities within, beyond, and on the margins of the academy. This course engages with the theoretical, political, practical, personal, and institutional challenges and opportunities of community-based research.

CUST 892 Special Topics Course: Becoming Science Fictional (3.0 Units)
Glenn Willmott
Date and time TBA
Science fiction emerged in the early twentieth century as one of the popular, new genres of “pulp” fiction. Pulp was regarded as a non-literary, sensationalist kind of writing produced not for libraries or bookshops but for newsstands and general stores; from the point of view of art, it was beneath serious consideration. Today, science fiction has become one of the preeminent modes of expression in popular as well as literary and experimental media. We are owning up to how fascinated, seduced, and terrified we are—and should be—by our deep entanglement and immersion in occult technologies, in challenging scientific knowledges, and in the many stories we tell ourselves to explain them. This course will explore how science fiction has expressed both symptomatic and more radical imaginings of gender, sexuality, race, ecology, technology, and political economy over the past century. We will focus mainly on theory and works in literature, with some attention to film and television; we will invite discussion and study of other arts, including non-narrative practices in music and fine arts. A provisional syllabus includes literature by Wells, Gilman, Stevens, Moore, Dick, LeGuin, Butler, Yu, and Chiang.

CUST 893 Special Topics Course: Counter Archives & Vulnerable Media: Ecologies, Economies and Materialities (3.0 Units)
Susan Lord
Date and time TBA
This course is focused on the study and creation of counter-archival and community-driven processes and forms of access for, primarily but not exclusively, audio-visual media. We will develop understanding of best practices in traditional and alternative archives, Indigenous and Queer Knowledge Architectures, trauma and affect in the archive, and modes and means of activating and remediating minor, alternative, hidden and vulnerable archives. The course focusses on the robust audio-visual histories of media makers whose cameras and microphones are used to contribute to community resilience, and as tools of critical reflection and interrogation of colonial and patriarchal archives. We will work in the Vulnerable Media Lab and in the seminar to produce  remediation projects. We will work with “born digital media” alongside a variety of analog, “obsolete” and “marginal” media, all of which share their own kinds of material vulnerabilities. We will develop methods and processes to ensure audio-visual history is preserved and made available according to culturally specific and ethically driven forms of access, thus engaging in new conversations about cultural heritage.

The course will intersect with ongoing projects in the Vulnerable Media Lab and the Archive/Counter Archive Project such that we participate in and learn from workshops, visiting artists and speakers, and other public activities.

Courses in Other Units

How do I register in a non-CUST course?

Step 1.  Identify the instructor for any non-CUST elective course that is of interest to you.  Students seeking electives should review the list below and explore other opportunities by reviewing the graduate websites for any departments of interest (i.e., the list below is not always comprehensive). Often, professors will be willing to take a CS student into their course if there is room, and if the student has the appropriate background.

Step 2.  Write to the instructor, by email, with a description of your goals and background, and ask if they will accept you into their course. Please note that the answer may not be certain yet, and may depend on enrollment numbers, but establishing the relationship is the first step.

Step 3.  Once you have approval, you will need to print and complete an Academic Change Form.  Once completed, you will need to sign the form yourself and arrange for it to be signed by (1) the course instructor and (2) your supervisor.  Return the completed, signed form to the Cultural Studies Office in B126B or cs.office@queensu.ca.

You may also wish to check the Department of Art History Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

ARTH 869: Topics in Contemporary Art: Transnational Perspectives on Feminism and Art, Fall 2021.
Instructor: Jen Kennedy
Time TBA

This graduate seminar examines feminist theory and activism in the visual arts from the 1960s to the present with a special focus on transnational networks of influence and exchange. How do artists in various parts of the world understand and express their relationships to gender and sexual politics as they intersect with race, class, locality, culture, religion, tradition, and other differences? How have the practices of feminist artists been shaped by colonialism, globalization, war, forced and voluntary migration, technology, and the many other processes through which people, ideas, and objects move around the world? How and why have artists organized across material and ideological borders to form transnational collaborations and coalitions? These and other questions will be considered through close analysis of artworks, exhibitions, literature, and scholarly texts.
A detailed list of readings and requirements will be available at the first class. In addition to participating in weekly seminars, students will develop individual research or research-creation projects which will be presented in a class colloquium at the end of the semester.
Please contact Jen Kennedy for permission to take this course.

You may also wish to check the Department of Classics Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

CLA 823: Greek Archaeology II, Fall 2021.
Instructor: Cristiana Zaccagnino
Time TBA

This course focuses on art in ancient Greece. We will discuss artists and artisans, from their social status to their ethnicity and gender, how they represented themselves, and their technical skills and innovations. We will study pottery, sculpture, and painting. Considering the material I cover, some background in Greek history, cult, and society is recommended.
Please contact Cristiana Zaccagnino for permission to take this course.

You may also wish to check the Dan School of Drama and Music Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

MUSC 491: Music and Mass Media, Winter 2022.
Instructor: Kip Pegley
Time TBA

In this course we explore both how we consume sound and music within a range of media (film, television, radio), and where we consume it (homes, elevators, gyms, grocery stores) in order to help educators think critically about the functions and effects of mass mediated sound and music in everyday environments.
Please contact Kip Pegley for permission to take this course.

You may also wish to check the Faculty of Education Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

You may also wish to check the Department of English Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

ENGL 865: Bodies in Motion: Refugees in Modern Times, Winter 2022.
Instructor: Asha Varadharajan
Time TBA

In the wake of the Holocaust, Hannah Arendt argued that the scale and depth of displacement she witnessed demanded a new guarantee for human dignity. Arendt's writings indicate that displacement is not unprecedented, but that its scale and brutality continue to escalate. The pandemic has, of course, produced its own form of woe. Both ecologically and politically motivated forced migration and involuntary displacement are the highest on record in our historical moment; thus, it is imperative to revisit the "refugee crisis" with a new set of questions and a different form of hope. Our keywords will be: biopolitics, risk, rights, humanitarian intervention, "economies of abandonment," "hostipitality," trauma and affect, mobilities, detention, deportation, and deterritorialization. In each case, we will ask how and why the figure (in both senses of the word) of the refugee recalibrates and reinvents these keywords. The required readings will be drawn from visual culture, political philosophy, socio-cultural anthropology, UN policy documents, investigative journalism, new media, documentary, poetry, and fiction. Our aim is to comprehend the singularity and historicity of the refugee condition. The assignments for this course will be expressed in a public voice designed to appeal and provoke widely while informed by scholarly and analytical rigour. Posters, audio/video, spoken word, song (lyric and music), art and photography, investigative reporting, poetry, fiction, and performance are all welcome but must be discussed with the instructor in advance. Attendance is mandatory unless prevented by a genuine emergency. Be prepared for focus, depth, and intensity! Participation will account for 40% of the final grade (online and in-person activities will be curated), and 3 short writing assignments with creative/multi-media options will account for the remaining 60%. The latter can be organized and presented according to individual preference and in continuous consultation with the instructor.
Please contact Asha Varadharajan for permission to take this course.

ENGL 872: Recent Trends in Asian Canadian Literatures, Fall 2021.
Instructor: Petra Fachinger
Friday, 12-2:30pm

Over the last decade a considerable body of innovative Asian Canadian works of literature has emerged, many of whose authors have either been nominated for or have won the most coveted literary awards. The seminar, which will include a selective number of writers born in the 1970s or later, intends to acknowledge the historical, cultural, social, and institutional specificities that affect the literary production of distinct Asian diasporas in this country. The seminar will focus on novels, creative nonfiction, and poetry dealing with mental illness, solidarity and kinship with Indigenous Peoples, alternate realities, and LGBTQ+ identities – issues that often intersect and have recently come to the fore in Asian Canadian writing. Our discussion will be informed by various theoretical approaches including critical race, queer, transgender, and Asian Canadian feminist theories.
Please contact Petra Fachinger for permission to take this course.

ENGL 884: Reading Saidiya Hartman, Fall 2021.
Instructor: Kristin Moriah
Tuesday, 9:30-12pm

In this course, we will read the work of Black cultural theorist Saidiya Hartman including Wayward Lives, Beautiful Experiments (Norton 2019); Lose Your Mother: A Journey Along the Atlantic Slave Route (Farrar, Straus and Giroux 2007); and Scenes of Subjection: Terror, Slavery, and Self-making in Nineteenth-Century America (Oxford University Press 1997). This course is offered at a moment in which the impact of Hartman’s work looms large. In a recent New Yorker magazine profile, writer Alexis Okeowo explains that Saidiya “occupies a singular position in contemporary culture: she is an academic, influenced by Michel Foucault, who has both received a MacArthur “genius” grant and appeared in a Jay-Z video.” Despite her celebrity status, Hartman’s scholarly work has shaped several fields including but not limited to Black feminist studies, African American Studies, Black Studies, Archival Studies and Performance Studies. By engaging with her writing and tracing its influence, students will be exposed to the key concepts and methodologies that energize contemporary Black Studies. Course requirements will include a class presentation and a final project developed in consultation with the instructor.
Please contact Kristin Moriah for permission to take this course.

You may also wish to check the Department of Film and Media Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

SCCS 812: Critical and Theoretical Approaches to Screen Cultures and Curatorial Studies.
Instructor: Scott MacKenzie
Time TBA

This course examines the key critical and theoretical tenets of screen cultures and curatorial studies. The course shall have both historical and contemporary components in order to situate the student within various fields of debate. We shall not only study film, media and curatorial studies theory in the course, but ask the question “what is theory”? What is its use value, what can theory do, and as importantly, not do? To undertake these questions, we will examine historical and contemporary forms of theory, approaching them not so much as “answers” but as tools that are generative: a form of intellectual creation the allows for the possibility to re-frame assumptions about how film, media, and curation function and circulate with dominant and counter public spheres. We will also ask questions about the relationship between theory as a tool and the art/film/media/exhibition object that it mobilized to advance a given theory. We will take a fairly eclectic approach in terms of case studies, looking at video art, “long” cinema, imaginary curation, experimental media, ethnographic media, advertising, art cinemas, digital media, and documentary. Selected theoretical approaches include psychoanalytic, Marxist, aesthetic, post-colonial, historiographical, feminist, queer, cultural, and ideological approaches to film, media, and curatorial studies, and screen cultures more generally.
Please contact Scott MacKenzie for permission to take this course.

SCCS 814: Histories and Methodologies of Screen Cultures and Curatorial Studies.
Instructor: Gary Kibbins
Time TBA

This course will provide a sampling of the various roles that a carefully designed methodology can play in production, criticism, and curatorial practices, with a view to expanding the possibilities in students’ research and research-creation projects. The goal is to assist the student in developing innovative but rigorous approaches in their research. We will develop responses to some fundamental questions regarding method. While familiar and clearly defined methodologies have indisputably proven their worth, are there other approaches which might contribute to research results? Is it always best practice to have a single, clearly defined methodology? Is it ever appropriate to entertain several different, and perhaps even competing methodologies in a single project? Can too much attention to controlling methodologies restrict research outcomes?
This course will explore emerging and to some extent experimental methodological approaches: the merging and hybridization of academic and artistic methods (research-creation); how changing views on the role and status of the author can effect method; how the careful use of constraints can paradoxically liberate research results; the relationship between the manifesto, and manifesto-like articulations, effect artistic and critical production, etc.
Please contact Gary Kibbins for permission to take this course.

SCCS 820:Media Production Seminar.
Instructor: Emily Pelstring
Time TBA

This course is designed for students with active creative practices. The course will facilitate structured peer feedback opportunities for students as they complete a self-directed project in the medium of their choice. Each student will be expected to take a single project from concept to completion during the semester. The project should be new at the start of the course, and should build on the student’s existing body of work. While students will be self-directed in the technical production of their projects, they will be accountable to the class for an introduction to their creative practice and background, a clear presentation of their production plan, well-prepared in-progress updates, a polished final presentation, and high-quality final documentation. Traditional studio-critique models will be consciously interrogated; students will be asked to reflect on the purpose and benefits of critique, and strive to develop a common language in order to communicate as creative peers with diverse practices and approaches.
There are no official pre-requisites for this class at this time. However, it is recommended that students have one of the following:
a portfolio of creative work; a CV with evidence of creative practice; a transcript with at least one course in any area of creative practice (writing, filmmaking, studio art, drama, music, digital media, dance, etc).
If none of those are available, students who wish to take this course are advised to attend an extra-curricular workshop in media production basics before taking the class.
Please contact Emily Pelstring for permission to take this course.

SCCS 828: Critical Curatorial Studies Seminar.
Instructor: Alicia Boutilier
Time TBA

This graduate seminar course addresses the histories, theories and issues of curatorial practice as a tool of cultural agency and considers evolving paradigms of “the curatorial.” Through critical analysis and engagement with readings and defined case studies, the class will investigate the forces and frameworks that shape the creation and presentation of exhibitions, programs and screenings, ranging across such topics as display formats, material and digital forms of narrative building, local and global circuits of reception, audience-making, resources/markets, festivals, institutional types and collections. Addressing both conceptual frameworks and the political economy of curatorial practice, students will consider the roles of belief systems/values, policy, politics, funding agencies and philanthropists as these impact cultural expression and exchange.
The meaning and usage of the word “curate” has evolved dramatically in recent years, both inside and outside the art world. This course explores the following core questions. What is the role of a curator? How do we best understand curatorial methodologies for the display of objects, experiences and information, and fully exercise their potential in different contexts? And, how do curators negotiate the aesthetic, social, political, physical and economic factors that shape and communicate creative cultural content? The aim of the seminar is to provide an in-depth understanding of curating today from a range of diverse perspectives. In examining curatorial practices and the material and virtual spaces they activate, students will develop critical visual literacy, as well as the advanced writing, analytical and presentation skills necessary for participation in current discourses and public-facing animation of artistic production.
Please contact Alicia Boutilier for permission to take this course.

SCCS 830: Curating in Context.
Instructor: Sunny Kerr
Time TBA

This production-oriented graduate course explores the development of exhibitions, programs, screenings and collections, with emphasis on drawing out and cultivating their relationship to context. Students will develop advanced understanding of curatorial methods, applied standards and innovative experimentation through projects fusing autonomous creative research, articulation and collaboration. The course offers a modular framework to support and enable students to encounter and experience practical strategies for the successful realization of artistic programs in visual and media arts, an approach applicable to both contemporary and historical works.
Taking advantage of the context of the Agnes Etherington Art Centre’s specialist staff, collections, facilities and artistic networks, students will undertake a guided team-driven project to explore and experience curatorial practice through developing an exhibition, screening, festival program or public-facing extra-mural or online artistic project. The course objective is to provide hands-on experience within an institutional context, while engaging in critical issues of curatorial practice under the instruction of a professional curator.
This course considers the ways in which curators develop, manage and engage with artists, audiences, collections, pragmatic mobilization of resources, aesthetic integrity and expressive potentials, while responding to diverse institutional and non-institutional contexts and histories, as well as geo-political and social conditions. What are the drivers that inform and shape the work of curators today? Through what strategies of curatorial practice can the context of presentation be mobilized?
Please contact Sunny Kerr for permission to take this course.

You may also wish to check the Department of Gender Studies Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

List of 2021-22 course offerings for Gender Studies

GNDS 810: Black Geographies/Abolition Geographies, Fall 2021.
Instructor: Katherine McKittrick
Wednesday, 4-7pm, REMOTE

Please contact Katherine McKittrick for permission to take this course.

GNDS 835: Settler Colonialism & Indigenous Politics, Fall 2021.
Instructor: Elizabeth Brulé
Tuesday, 10-11:30am & Thursday 8:30-10am, location TBA

Please contact Elizabeth Brulé for permission to take this course.

GNDS 836: Feminist and Queer Ethnography, Fall 2021.
Instructor: Ayca Tomac
Wednesday, 2:30-5:30pm, REMOTE

Please contact Ayca Tomac for permission to take this course.

You may also wish to check the Department of Geography and Planning Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

GPHY 860: Anti-Colonial Urbanism, Fall 2021.
Instructor: Carolyn Prouse
Tuesday, 2:30-5:30pm, location TBA

This course is inspired by the recent proliferation of theories of the urban. While there have always been multiple understandings of the city, the urban studies inter-discipline has historically privileged models and theories derived from very specific cities and political economic relations in the Euro-Atlantic world. For the last two decades urban scholars of the South have been calling for new geographies of urban theory. From India, South Africa and the Dominican Republic, to Singapore, Australia and Canada, scholars and activists alike are unsettling and challenging Northern and masculinist ways of knowing. In this class we will explore some of the many recent (and not-so-recent) conceptualizations of urbanization that pay attention to diverse and intersecting relations of power, from race and capitalism to heteronormativity and colonialism. We will focus specifically on postcolonial, decolonial, feminist, queer and critical race theory, and try to understand what each contributes to an understanding of urban processes and experiences.
Please contact Carolyn Prouse for permission to take this course.

GPHY 870: Historical and Cultural Issues in Fieldwork, Winter 2022.
Instructor: Laura Jean Cameron
Time and location TBA

This course actively explores the histories, practises and cultural meanings of fieldwork. Geographical fieldwork is considered along with conceptions of the 'field' in allied disciplines such as ecology and anthropology. Constructions of the 'field' are addressed in terms of empire, nationalism, 'nature', pedagogy, translocalism, the lab-field border, performativity and in relation to its role as a gendered, ethical, racialized, imaginative, biopoliticized, sensory and affective space of knowledge and activity.
Fieldwork has long had a key role in the making of knowledge in both social and natural sciences. Recent work in geography, sociology and the history of science has begun to explore diverse cultures of the field, raising a range of questions about the nature of field knowledge. Where is the field and for whom? The course focuses on case studies and currents pertinent to the study of field cultures within North America and elsewhere. The primary objective is to provide opportunities for in-depth discussion and activities to help understand and reassess the motives, practises and status of fieldwork.
Weekly seminars will involve excursions, discussion of the course readings, films, field exercises as well as presentations integrating course themes and reflections upon the students' past and future fieldwork activities. The readings, including relevant journal articles and book chapters, will be made available.
Please contact Laura Jean Cameron for permission to take this course.

You may also wish to check the Department of Global Development Studies Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

DEVS 813: lobal Environmental Politics, Winter 2022.
Instructor: Kyla Tienhaara
Tuesday, 11:30-2:30pm

This seminar examines the political challenges of addressing the global environmental crisis. The first half of the course will focus on key moments in the history of global environmental governance from the Stockholm Conference in 1972 to the signing of the Paris Agreement in 2015. Students will explore how various actors (e.g. states, international organizations, scientists, corporations, activists) have shaped the outcomes in these moments for better or worse. The extent to which the “North-South” divide has hindered progress in global environmental governance will also be addressed. In the second half of the course, students will assess efforts to “green” global economic institutions, with particular attention given to the World Bank and the World Trade Organization.
Please contact Kyla Tienhaara for permission to take this course.

DEVS 492/870: Tourism in Transition, Fall 2021.
Instructor: Marc Epprecht
Wednesday, 11:30-2:30pm

In 2019 tourism accounted for 10-11% of employment globally. For some countries, its promotion was the principal development strategy, with noteworthy successes achieved over the past few decades. Compelling critiques of tourism’s environmental, cultural, unequal economic and other harmful impacts, as well as rapid changes in technology and in tourist demography, were giving rise both to new harms (such as “overtourism,” “Instagram effect” – next up, space tourism) and new strategies to mitigate them (including “community-based” and “eco-tourism”). COVID-19 largely shut down the industry with devastating impacts in tourism-dependent economies. But it also sparked creative initiatives to re-think tourism as a sustainable, social justice-oriented development strategy. This course critically assesses the history and explores contemporary practices of tourism planning for a post-pandemic, climate crisis, “new normal” world.
Please contact Marc Epprecht for permission to take this course.

DEVS 874: Migrants, Race, and Work: Examining Migration at the intersections of Gender, Race, and Masculinity, Winter 2022.
Instructor: Reena Kukreja
Tuesday, 8:30-11:30am

In recent years, the study of migration has moved to the centre stage of development policy and development theorisation. As the movement and numbers of migrants has increased globally, populist backlash against certain classes and categories of migrants has gained momentum with restrictive visa and border control regimes and rhetoric of hate. This has thrown theoretical and practical challenges for development studies, most notably the relationships between migration and urbanization, industrialization, precarious work, remittance economy, family structure, gender roles, ideology. There is a pressing need to understand how migration, restrictive border controls, neoliberal citizenship, and the construction of migrant ‘illegality’ are affecting societies and, (re)shaping work strategies, gender relations, gender roles, and masculinity, among others.
This intensive seminar course will challenge you to rethink the interface between development and migration by undertaking an analysis of voluntary or involuntary migratory trajectories of people in the contemporary moment. By keeping at the centre of its inquiry, intersections of gender, race, class, sexuality, and masculinity, the course will provide cutting-edge theorisation about how these interfaces impact migration patterns, policies, societies, and, most importantly, the lived experiences of the migrants. The focus of the course will be North America and Europe as ‘receiving’ regions. It will adopt an interdisciplinary approach, drawing on literature ranging from migration studies, critical masculinity studies, and gender studies and diverse material including auto-ethnographies, photovoice, documentaries, and films in facilitating a nuanced theoretical grounding on this subject.
Please contact Reena Kukreja for permission to take this course.

DEVS 876: Visualizing Culture, Fall 2021.
Instructor: Celeste Pedri-Spade
Thursday, 11:30-2:30pm

This course addresses the study and interpretation of social organizations and cultures in everyday life using photography and film. Beginning with a critical analysis of how the visual entered social science research, this course will move towards contemporary approaches that highlight the embodied and sensory dimensions of the visual. Students will complete several image-based projects in order to gain necessary skills associated with visually conveying socio-cultural practice and lived experience.
Note: All students must have access to the following technology/resources: • Photography and Video recorder (it can be your smartphone) • An application for editing/making short film (e.g. IMovie) • An application for editing photographs (not required but would be useful) Available only to MA and PhD students.
Please contact Celeste Pedri-Spade for permission to take this course.

You may also wish to check the Department of History Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

HIST 416: Material History in Canada, Winter 2022.
Instructor: Caroline-Isabelle Caron
Tuesday, 11:30-2:30

Introduction to the basics of material history analysis focusing on the 'stuff' of everyday life in Canada, and how it has shaped Canadian identities and cultures since 1900. The main goal is to show students how artifacts can inform and enrich historical inquiry by integrating methodological frameworks from archaeology, anthropology, etc.
Please contact Caroline-Isabelle Caron for permission to take this course.

HIST 481: History vs Pseudo-history, Fall 2021.
Instructor: Caroline-Isabelle Caron
Remote and asynchronous

Students explore the prevalence of pseudo-history in Canadian popular media and apply critical tools to identify these modern myths. From ancient aliens to destroyed civilizations, why does history inspire theories about lost civilizations, dark conspiracies, apocalyptic predictions or mysterious technologies? How do we tell the truth from the bunk?
Please contact Caroline-Isabelle Caron for permission to take this course.

HIST 865: Empires and Intimacies, Fall and Winter.
Instructor: Karen Dubinsky
Tuesday, 2:30-5:30pm, location TBA

This course explores the transnational “emotional economy”: that is, familial and intimate relations of power created in and by empires, in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The readings are thematic and interdisciplinary, drawn primarily from Canada, the US, Latin America and the Caribbean. Topics include family relations, childhood, tourism, sexual politics, colonial knowledge formation, visual cultures. Power relations expressed through gender and race are foregrounded.
This is a two term reading and research course which provides students the opportunity to pursue an independent research project in second term.
Please contact Karen Dubinsky for permission to take this course.

HIST 877: History Memory Commemoration, Fall 2021.
Instructor: Caroline-Isabelle Caron
Time TBA

This graduate seminar will introduce the major theoretical frameworks of collective memory, commemoration and memorials, public and institutional history, and other forms of collective memory making, using seminal Canadian, American and European case studies. Particular attention will be given to the major approaches developed over the last thirty years, introducing the most important researchers of this very popular field, also focusing on ground-breaking techniques and innovative primary sources. The major objective is to familiarize students with the best studies in the field and prepare them to undertake studies using these principles.
Please contact Caroline-Isabelle Caron for permission to take this course.

You may also wish to check the School of Environmental Studies and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

You may also wish to check the School of Kinesiology and Health Studies and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

KHS 873: Critical Methodologies: The Politics of Knowledge and Research, Fall 2021.
Instructor: Mary Louise Adams
Time TBA

This seminar explores the politics of knowledge in research that aims to advance social justice. Taking a historical approach, it draws from a range of critical perspectives -- e.g., feminism, Indigenous Studies, critical race theory, queer studies, political economy -- to develop a frame for post-positivist, interpretive and qualitative research, including activist and community-based research.
Please contact Mary Louise Adams for permission to take this course.

You may also wish to check the Faculty of Law Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

You may also wish to check the Department of Philosophy and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

PHIL 893: Environmental Philosophy, Winter 2022.
Instructor: Mick Smith
Time TBA

This course will engage with a number of key environmental issues such as biodiversity and extinction, preservation or conservation, environmental and social justice, eco-feminism, deep ecology, bioregionalism and ecological restoration drawing on various philosophical traditions in ethics, hermeneutics, political philosophy, ontology, and phenomenology. The aim is to provide both an overview of the variety of topics that can be encompassed within environmental philosophy and to encourage participants to develop critical and innovative approaches to questions of direct practical import. While the focus will generally be on our ethical relations to non-human entities and our understanding and interpretation of these relations we will be particularly concerned to examine the ways in which our ethical evaluations might be informed by, and inform, our understandings of particular places/environments.
Please contact Mick Smith for permission to take this course.

You may also wish to check the Department of Political Studies and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

You may also wish to check the Department of Psychology Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

You may also wish to check the School of Religion Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

You may also wish to check the Department of Sociology Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

SOCY 917: Quantitative Methods, Fall 2021.
Instructor: Victoria Sytsma
Time TBA

This course serves as an introduction to a broad range of quantitative methods typically employed in the social sciences in a manner suitable for students at the graduate-level. Students will learn to prepare data for analysis, carry out analyses, and interpret research results using a variety of statistical techniques. Students will be acquainted with the assumptions that are made while employing various methods, as well as the problems that arise with the use of such methods.
Please contact Victoria Sytsma for permission to take this course.

SOCY 931: New Media Cultures / Media Sociology, Winter 2022.
Instructor: Michael Siciliano
Time TBA

This course provides graduate-level students with a grounding in media research traditions within sociology and an overview of current issues in the sociological study of media. Though the course emphasizes “new” media technologies and contexts of technological mediation, readings will deal with a variety of cultural and technological forms in order to provide conceptual richness in approaching forms of mediated social life.
The first four weeks of the course consist of classic readings from and discussion of structural (critical political economy, production of culture) and agential (British and North American cultural studies) perspectives in media sociology. By no means exhaustive, this portion is intended to provide a foundation for Weeks 5 & 6 in which we discuss more contemporary theoretical emphases on materiality, performativity, enchantment, and the embeddedness of social life within media infrastructures. The remaining weeks will focus on particular, empirical topics to be chosen by members of the course. Options include (but are by no means limited to) the labor of media production and mediated labor, industrial processes of media production, the politics of algorithmic visibility, the politics of digital interfaces, social movements and radicalization online, media as tool of colonial/political/class domination/resistance, and the mediated body.
As a sociology course, readings and discussion focus on the social aspects of media and media technologies rather than focusing on the specific content or messages of any particular media object. (New) media sociology tends to be interdisciplinary and so goes this course. Readings comes from cultural sociology, anthropology, communication, cultural studies, and media studies.
Please contact Michael Siciliano for permission to take this course.

SOCY 934: Global Surveillance Controversies, Fall 2021.
Instructor: David Murakami Wood
Time TBA

This graduate course in surveillance studies covers six major contemporary controversies, in 2-week ‘modules.’ Each module comprises a short introductory lecture from the course leader (and occasionally guest contributions), a series of theoretical and empirical readings and other media, and will have a small research task and a short reading response. This year the modules will be: • Surveillance, Blackness and Policing – the current uprising in the USA and elsewhere will be considered through the history and contemporary practices of policing black lives from stop and search to biometrics. • Surveillance and Authoritarianism – new surveillance technologies give contemporary authoritarian states power out of reach of classic authoritarian regimes. This module focuses on China’s ‘social credit’ and urban safety schemes, as well as the repression of popular movements in Xinjiang and Hong Kong, as examples. • Surveillance on Screen - surveillance has become an increasingly common theme in contemporary film, television and games. In this module, we will view 2 surveillance films and discuss them in relation to other media, as well as society and politics. • Smart Cities – the aftermath of Sidewalk Labs’ failed plan for Toronto’s waterfront will be examined, alongside the ambitious schemes for new cities in Saudi Arabia, India and Brazil. • Pandemic Surveillance – the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has seen an upsurge in surveillance technological solutions ‘for our own good’. This module examines the conflict around Contact-Tracing apps, vaccine passports, wearable technology and robots in countries around the world. • Surveillance and the Climate Emergency – humanity is currently facing its biggest challenge, global climate breakdown. This module examines how surveillance systems generate knowledge about climate, and how they might help in resolving the emergency, but at the same time how this, along with many of the other trends examined in this course, could embed surveillance into government at the planetary scale.
Please contact David Murakami Wood for permission to take this course.

SOCY 936: Disability Studies, Winter 2022.
Instructor: Thomas Abrams
Wednesday, 11:20-2:30pm, location TBA

Disability Studies explores the cultural formation of ability and disability, with an eye to removing disabling barriers for all persons. This course will serve as an advanced introduction to that discipline, with an emphasis on theoretical and qualitative sociological research. More than just a sociology of disability, this means using disability to reframe classical and contemporary theories of social life, and exploring disablement as a site of transformative change and the politics of access. Concretely, this course will explore the medical and social models of disability, their detractors, intersectional and critical theories of disability, and empirical studies of disablement. By focusing on disability and ability, the seminar should be of interest to those interested in disability, and the social and material organization of capability more generally. Some basic questions that frame the course content: What is the relationship between disability and impairment? What are the politics underpinning disability terminology? What is the role of rehabilitation in the politics of disability and ability? What is the relationship between physical and mental disability? Who gets to theorize disability? Does disability change under different modes of economic organization? Students should finish the seminar with an understanding of disability studies debates, their history, key disability studies thinkers, and points of similarity with adjacent spaces of academic inquiry, not solely within sociology.
Topics covered (readings are still being updated): The Social Model Phenomenology and Disability Foucault, Disability and Governmentality Disability and Science and Technology Studies Empirical Studies of Disability and Sex/Work Disability and Feminist Ethics of Care Intersectionality and Disability Justice Affect, Assemblage, and Rehabilitation Disability and Temporality Assignments include a presentation (or equivalently sized paper), an outline and annotated bibliography, and a 6000-word final paper.
Please contact Thomas Abrams for permission to take this course.