Courses

Cultural Studies Courses 2021-2022

Cultural Studies MA and PhD students must take "CUST 802/902 Cultural Studies Colloquium" plus four other courses.  Students are required to complete at least two courses in CUST, one of which must be CUST 803 (Cultural Studies Past & Present).  Remaining courses may be chosen from CUST or selected from elective courses offered by other departments.  All courses are generally completed during the first year of study.

Please note that graduate courses are often timetabled in June and this page will be updated as information becomes available to us.  Class times and locations will also be made available by the department where the courses is offered - please be sure to check the graduate section of their website.

Cultural Studies Courses

CUST 850 Capstone Project (6.0 units)
Asha Varadharajan
May 4,10am-1pm and 2pm-5pm. Mac-Corry B130.
May 11,10am-1pm and 2pm-5pm. Mac-Corry B130.
May 18,10am-1pm and 2pm-5pm. Mac-Corry B130.
May 25, 10am-1pm and 2pm-5pm. Mac-Corry B130.
June 1, 10am-1pm and 2pm-5pm. Mac-Corry B130.
June 8. 10am-1pm and 2pm-5pm. Mac-Corry B130.

In this workshop course, MA students will substantially revise or transform work from a previous Queen’s graduate course with the goal of publication or other dissemination, and produce a reflection on professional development activities pursued throughout the year.

CUST 815-001 Skilling It: The Art of the Workshop (1.0 unit, Pass/Fail)
Carina Magazzeni
(c.magazzeni@queensu.ca)
Abby Nowakowski
(ugallery@queensu.ca)
July 6,12pm-4pm Union Gallery.
July 13,12pm-4pm. Union Gallery.
July 20,12pm-4pm. Union Gallery.

Using the gallery space as an alternative classroom, the instructors will lead various workshops and activities that provide teaching strategies and insight into how to design, coordinate and instruct a workshop. While workshops will have roots in the arts, course material is not exclusive to artists or arts workers. Workshops will have an environmental focus, cover sustainable approaches towards workshop design and explore different textile techniques, including solar dyeing, eco-printing, upcycling fabrics and slow stitching.

CUST 817-001 Signs of the Times - Visualizing Future Foodways: Creative Interventions and Food Policy (1.0 unit, Pass/Fail)
Zoë Heyn-Jones
(zheynjon@uwo.ca)
Amanda White
(awhit262@uwo.ca)
Wednesday July 6, 6-8pm (remote).
Wednesday July 13, 6-8pm (remote).
Wednesday July 20, 6-8pm (remote).
Wednesday July 27, 6-8pm (remote).
Wednesday August 3, 6-8pm (remote).
Wednesday August 10, 6-8pm (remote).

The urgent problems we face connected to global food systems—from hunger and food insecurity to greenhouse gas emissions and deforestation—demand creative and innovative solutions. How can the arts respond? This micro-course will present creative work at the intersection of art and food, reexamined through the lens of contemporary pressing issues around food and agriculture. Together we will consider the potential ways in which artistic and curatorial practices might engage meaningfully with issues of food security, sovereignty and justice, and how it might impact policy. We invite scientists, artists, cultural studies scholars, food researchers and any other interested participants to join in this interdisciplinary conversation. Through a series of discussions and creative presentations, we will explore the nexus of food, art, and policy. Together we will collectively imagine how research-creation can impact the imperative changes we need to make to feed the world while tackling the climate emergency.

CUST 817-002 Signs of the Times - The Future of Fashion? Slow Fashion and the Fibreshed Movement (1.0 unit, Pass/Fail)
Johanna Amos
johanna.amos@queensu.ca
Tuesday 12 July 9:00am - 10:00am, Isabel Bader Room 312.
Tuesday 19 July 9:00am - 3:00pm (includes 1 hour break for lunch), Stone Spindle Farm, Tamworth.
Tuesday 26 July 9:00am - 12:00pm, KHWS Studio and Tett Rehearsal Hall.
Tuesday 2 August, 9:00am - 12:00pm, KHWS Studio and Tett Rehearsal Hall. 

Today’s global fashion industry is one of the most environmentally destructive in the world. Recent studies suggest it accounts for 10% of carbon emissions, 20% of wastewater generation and, as a global polluter, it ranks second only to the petroleum industry. At the same time, the human cost of fashion has made headlines around the world. From the collapse of Rana Plaza in Savar, Bangladesh in 2013 to the mass dismissal of garment workers during the Coronavirus pandemic, the toll of the industry on workers’ bodies and lives is becoming harder to ignore. In some corners this has prompted a rethink, and a consideration of how companies and individuals might participate in a more ethical and sustainable fashion industry. For many, this has meant a return to and reinvigoration of historical tools and techniques. This micro-course explores some of these alternatives through a focus on slow fashion, with a particular emphasis on how the local fibreshed movement—a movement that advocates for clothing grown and sewn in the same geographic region in which one lives—has drawn upon historical settler practices of cloth production. Working in collaboration with instructors from the Kingston Handloom Weavers& Spinners (KHWS), participants will learn about the history and conceptual foundation of slow fashion and gain an understanding of how makers adhere to the ideals of the fibreshedmovement through a series of hands-on lessons in spinning, natural dyeing, and weaving. The final outcome of the course will be a collaboratively-made textile.

CUST 894 Directed Community-Based Practicum
This course is intended to support a student's MA or PhD research through organizational and social experience gained from involvement with relevant off-campus institutions, organizations, and community groups. A CS faculty member will oversee each placement in collaboration with a member of the relevant organization or group.  Please note that practicum courses must be arranged well in advance: do not wait until September.

CUST 895 Agnes Etherington Practicum
Alicia Boutilier (Chief Curator/Curator of Canadian Historical Art, Agnes Etherington Art Centre)
This applied research internship in a professional art museum cultivates understanding of the capacity and disciplinary protocols surrounding research and public presentation of critical cultures within an institutional framework. The focus of the course is a defined research project developed in consultation with the supervising curator and contributing to the Art Centre’s exhibition program or collection development. Practicum students work on-site at the Art Centre 10 hours per week, with additional research hours required. For information on the curatorial direction of our contemporary art program, please refer to the gallery website. Graduate students with relevant education and/or experience in visual and media art or art history in the Cultural Studies Programs at a Masters or Doctoral level are eligible to apply. Those interested should submit a letter of intent describing their goals and areas of interest, a CV and a transcript of their academic record. Admission will be based on interviews, and is contingent on identification of a research project aligned with student research interests and evolving gallery needs. Applications should be submitted well in advance of the desired semester, usually at the beginning of the previous semester to allow for planning. Practica may take place in the fall, winter or spring/summer semester.​  Please note that practicum courses must be arranged well in advance: do not wait until September.

Under the supervision of an individual faculty member, students may conduct intensive reading in a research area not offered in core or elective courses. Readings are to be arranged in consultation with the faculty supervisor, and accompanied by meetings during the term to discuss the readings and submission of written assignments. (This course will be offered when faculty resources are available.)

CUST 990 Directed Studies I
​CUST 991 Directed Studies II
CUST 890 Directed Studies I
CUST 891 Directed Studies II

Cultural Studies micro-courses devote 12 hours to exploring a particular method, moment, or phenomenon and are designed to help students extend theory to current issues, build scholarship, connect research with practice, and gather new tools. The courses are delivered in a condensed format and will be counted as a 1.0 unit course. Micro-courses are graded as pass/fail. For full time graduate students, there is no additional cost to take any of these courses. 

Please view under the "Summer 2022" dropdown on this page, for current micro-course offerings.


CUST 815 Skilling It

This course offers specialized in-depth instruction in topics related to Cultural Studies Methodology.

Offered summer 2022


CUST 816 Up Close

This course offers intensive consideration of a major book or work in any medium.

Not offered in 2020-2021


CUST 817 Signs of the Times

This course offers intensive consideration of an issue or event of contemporary social, political and cultural relevance.

Offered summer 2022

CUST 802/902 Cultural Studies Colloquium (6.0 Units).  Required Course.
Jeff Brison
Wednesday, 2:30-5:30pm (Mackintosh-Corry Hall B176 Area - Lecture Theatre - B125)

This course is designed to acquaint graduate students with both current work in the field and various forms of professionalization, through a combination of research presentations and participatory workshops. Students are expected to attend regularly and complete some reflective writing activities. Grading is on a Pass/Fail basis.

CUST 803 Cultural Studies Past & Present (3.0 Units).  Required Course.
Date and time TBA

burcu baba
This course introduces students to the global and interdisciplinary scope of Cultural Studies research practices by surveying key debates, concerns, and texts that have shaped the field over time.

CUST 805 Research Creation (3.0 Units)
Dolleen Manning
Date and time TBA
This course is designed to support students whose intellectual approach combines creative and academic research practices. The course will value the development of knowledge and innovation through artistic practice, scholarly investigation, and experimentation. Please note that this course is offered primarily as a methods course for Research-Creation practitioners and the main method of evaluation is production of R-C work.

CUST 806 Indigenous Special Topics (3.0 Units)
Celeste Pedri-Spade
Date and time TBA
 

​CUST 807 Settler Colonialism and Incarceration (3.0 Units)
Lisa Guenther
Date and time TBA

Current scholarship on prison abolition tends to focus on the relation between slavery and mass incarceration, but it’s not clear how this framework helps to address the hyper-incarceration of Indigenous peoples in Canada and other settler colonial states. In this seminar, we will study abolitionist (and) decolonial movements with the aim of recovering and co-creating methods for dismantling carceral-colonial institutions and building freer, healthier, and more just communities. Throughout the semester, we will reflect on the map as both a colonial instrument of domination and a creative tool for navigating oppressive structures and sketching concrete alternatives to the world that slavery and colonialism has built. We will also activate our collective power to dream, not as an escapist fantasy but as a critical research method that moves beyond an analysis of what is wrong with the world to experiment with ways of making it better. Readings will include work by Saidiya Hartman, Nick Estes, Robin Kelley, Dionne Brand, and Leanne Simpson.

CUST 802/902 Cultural Studies Colloquium (6.0 Units).  Required Course.
Jeff Brison
Wednesday, 2:30-5:30pm (Mackintosh-Corry Hall B176 Area - Lecture Theatre - B125)

This course is designed to acquaint graduate students with both current work in the field and various forms of professionalization, through a combination of research presentations and participatory workshops. Students are expected to attend regularly and complete some reflective writing activities. Grading is on a Pass/Fail basis.

CUST 800 Cultural Studies Theory (3.0 Units) 
Ali Na
Date and time TBA

This course unpacks and explores key theories and philosophies relevant to cultural studies, with a focus on critical cultural and minoritarian perspectives. The course will weave between contemporary works and influential intellectual histories. We will practice interpreting dense theoretical works while also engaging how these ideas have been institutionalized and to what effects. The course will engage generously with an openness to what the concepts and texts might do and have offered as well as confront the afterlives of theory and criticism, which often include omissions, erasures, and modes of subordination. Concepts covered include capitalist critique, hegemony, race, feminisms, queerness, madness, post/decoloniality, archives, and intersectionality.

CUST 804 Community-Based Research (3.0 Units)
Reena Kukreja
Date and time TBA
TBC As cultural producers, activists, and/or researches, Cultural Studies students interact with various communities within, beyond, and on the margins of the academy. This course engages with the theoretical, political, practical, personal, and institutional challenges and opportunities of community-based research.

CUST 892 Special Topics Course: Becoming Science Fictional (3.0 Units)
Glenn Willmott
Date and time TBA
Science fiction emerged in the early twentieth century as one of the popular, new genres of “pulp” fiction. Pulp was regarded as a non-literary, sensationalist kind of writing produced not for libraries or bookshops but for newsstands and general stores; from the point of view of art, it was beneath serious consideration. Today, science fiction has become one of the preeminent modes of expression in popular as well as literary and experimental media. We are owning up to how fascinated, seduced, and terrified we are—and should be—by our deep entanglement and immersion in occult technologies, in challenging scientific knowledges, and in the many stories we tell ourselves to explain them. This course will explore how science fiction has expressed both symptomatic and more radical imaginings of gender, sexuality, race, ecology, technology, and political economy over the past century. We will focus mainly on theory and works in literature, with some attention to film and television; we will invite discussion and study of other arts, including non-narrative practices in music and fine arts. A provisional syllabus includes literature by Wells, Gilman, Stevens, Moore, Dick, LeGuin, Butler, Yu, and Chiang.

 

CUST-850 Capstone Project (6.0 units)
Laura Murray
Date and time are TBA.

In this workshop course, MA students will substantially revise or transform work from a previous Queen’s graduate course with the goal of publication or other dissemination, and produce a reflection on professional development activities pursued throughout the year.

Courses in Other Units

How do I register in a non-CUST course?

Step 1.  Identify the instructor for any non-CUST elective course that is of interest to you.  Students seeking electives should review the list below and explore other opportunities by reviewing the graduate websites for any departments of interest (i.e., the list below is not always comprehensive). Often, professors will be willing to take a CS student into their course if there is room, and if the student has the appropriate background.

Step 2.  Write to the instructor, by email, with a description of your goals and background, and ask if they will accept you into their course. Please note that the answer may not be certain yet, and may depend on enrollment numbers, but establishing the relationship is the first step.

Step 3.  Once you have approval, you will need to print and complete an Academic Change Form.  Once completed, you will need to sign the form yourself and arrange for it to be signed by (1) the course instructor and (2) your supervisor.  Return the completed, signed form to the Cultural Studies Office in B126B or cs.office@queensu.ca.

You may also wish to check the Department of Art History Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

 

You may also wish to check the Department of Classics Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

 

You may also wish to check the Dan School of Drama and Music Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

 

You may also wish to check the Faculty of Education Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

You may also wish to check the Department of English Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

 

 

 

You may also wish to check the Department of Film and Media Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

SCCS 812: Critical and Theoretical Approaches to Screen Cultures and Curatorial Studies.
Instructor: Scott MacKenzie
Time TBA

This course examines the key critical and theoretical tenets of screen cultures and curatorial studies. The course shall have both historical and contemporary components in order to situate the student within various fields of debate. We shall not only study film, media and curatorial studies theory in the course, but ask the question “what is theory”? What is its use value, what can theory do, and as importantly, not do? To undertake these questions, we will examine historical and contemporary forms of theory, approaching them not so much as “answers” but as tools that are generative: a form of intellectual creation the allows for the possibility to re-frame assumptions about how film, media, and curation function and circulate with dominant and counter public spheres. We will also ask questions about the relationship between theory as a tool and the art/film/media/exhibition object that it mobilized to advance a given theory. We will take a fairly eclectic approach in terms of case studies, looking at video art, “long” cinema, imaginary curation, experimental media, ethnographic media, advertising, art cinemas, digital media, and documentary. Selected theoretical approaches include psychoanalytic, Marxist, aesthetic, post-colonial, historiographical, feminist, queer, cultural, and ideological approaches to film, media, and curatorial studies, and screen cultures more generally.
Please contact Scott MacKenzie for permission to take this course.

SCCS 814: Histories and Methodologies of Screen Cultures and Curatorial Studies.
Instructor: Gary Kibbins
Time TBA

This course will provide a sampling of the various roles that a carefully designed methodology can play in production, criticism, and curatorial practices, with a view to expanding the possibilities in students’ research and research-creation projects. The goal is to assist the student in developing innovative but rigorous approaches in their research. We will develop responses to some fundamental questions regarding method. While familiar and clearly defined methodologies have indisputably proven their worth, are there other approaches which might contribute to research results? Is it always best practice to have a single, clearly defined methodology? Is it ever appropriate to entertain several different, and perhaps even competing methodologies in a single project? Can too much attention to controlling methodologies restrict research outcomes?
This course will explore emerging and to some extent experimental methodological approaches: the merging and hybridization of academic and artistic methods (research-creation); how changing views on the role and status of the author can effect method; how the careful use of constraints can paradoxically liberate research results; the relationship between the manifesto, and manifesto-like articulations, effect artistic and critical production, etc.
Please contact Gary Kibbins for permission to take this course.

SCCS 820:Media Production Seminar.
Instructor: Emily Pelstring
Time TBA

This course is designed for students with active creative practices. The course will facilitate structured peer feedback opportunities for students as they complete a self-directed project in the medium of their choice. Each student will be expected to take a single project from concept to completion during the semester. The project should be new at the start of the course, and should build on the student’s existing body of work. While students will be self-directed in the technical production of their projects, they will be accountable to the class for an introduction to their creative practice and background, a clear presentation of their production plan, well-prepared in-progress updates, a polished final presentation, and high-quality final documentation. Traditional studio-critique models will be consciously interrogated; students will be asked to reflect on the purpose and benefits of critique, and strive to develop a common language in order to communicate as creative peers with diverse practices and approaches.
There are no official pre-requisites for this class at this time. However, it is recommended that students have one of the following:
a portfolio of creative work; a CV with evidence of creative practice; a transcript with at least one course in any area of creative practice (writing, filmmaking, studio art, drama, music, digital media, dance, etc).
If none of those are available, students who wish to take this course are advised to attend an extra-curricular workshop in media production basics before taking the class.
Please contact Emily Pelstring for permission to take this course.

SCCS 828: Critical Curatorial Studies Seminar.
Instructor: Alicia Boutilier
Time TBA

This graduate seminar course addresses the histories, theories and issues of curatorial practice as a tool of cultural agency and considers evolving paradigms of “the curatorial.” Through critical analysis and engagement with readings and defined case studies, the class will investigate the forces and frameworks that shape the creation and presentation of exhibitions, programs and screenings, ranging across such topics as display formats, material and digital forms of narrative building, local and global circuits of reception, audience-making, resources/markets, festivals, institutional types and collections. Addressing both conceptual frameworks and the political economy of curatorial practice, students will consider the roles of belief systems/values, policy, politics, funding agencies and philanthropists as these impact cultural expression and exchange.
The meaning and usage of the word “curate” has evolved dramatically in recent years, both inside and outside the art world. This course explores the following core questions. What is the role of a curator? How do we best understand curatorial methodologies for the display of objects, experiences and information, and fully exercise their potential in different contexts? And, how do curators negotiate the aesthetic, social, political, physical and economic factors that shape and communicate creative cultural content? The aim of the seminar is to provide an in-depth understanding of curating today from a range of diverse perspectives. In examining curatorial practices and the material and virtual spaces they activate, students will develop critical visual literacy, as well as the advanced writing, analytical and presentation skills necessary for participation in current discourses and public-facing animation of artistic production.
Please contact Alicia Boutilier for permission to take this course.

SCCS 830: Curating in Context.
Instructor: Sunny Kerr
Time TBA

This production-oriented graduate course explores the development of exhibitions, programs, screenings and collections, with emphasis on drawing out and cultivating their relationship to context. Students will develop advanced understanding of curatorial methods, applied standards and innovative experimentation through projects fusing autonomous creative research, articulation and collaboration. The course offers a modular framework to support and enable students to encounter and experience practical strategies for the successful realization of artistic programs in visual and media arts, an approach applicable to both contemporary and historical works.
Taking advantage of the context of the Agnes Etherington Art Centre’s specialist staff, collections, facilities and artistic networks, students will undertake a guided team-driven project to explore and experience curatorial practice through developing an exhibition, screening, festival program or public-facing extra-mural or online artistic project. The course objective is to provide hands-on experience within an institutional context, while engaging in critical issues of curatorial practice under the instruction of a professional curator.
This course considers the ways in which curators develop, manage and engage with artists, audiences, collections, pragmatic mobilization of resources, aesthetic integrity and expressive potentials, while responding to diverse institutional and non-institutional contexts and histories, as well as geo-political and social conditions. What are the drivers that inform and shape the work of curators today? Through what strategies of curatorial practice can the context of presentation be mobilized?
Please contact Sunny Kerr for permission to take this course.

You may also wish to check the Department of Gender Studies Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

 

You may also wish to check the Department of Geography and Planning Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

 

You may also wish to check the Department of Global Development Studies Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

 

 

You may also wish to check the Department of History Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

 

You may also wish to check the School of Environmental Studies and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

You may also wish to check the School of Kinesiology and Health Studies and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

 

You may also wish to check the Faculty of Law Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

You may also wish to check the Department of Philosophy and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

 

You may also wish to check the Department of Political Studies and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

You may also wish to check the Department of Psychology Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

You may also wish to check the School of Religion Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

You may also wish to check the Department of Sociology Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.