Courses

Cultural Studies Courses 2022-2023

Cultural Studies MA and PhD students must take CUST 802/902 (Cultural Studies Colloquium) plus four other courses including: 

1. at least two courses in CUST, one of which must be CUST 803 (Cultural Studies Past & Present).

  • Note: For the 2022-2023 academic year only, CUST 800 (Cultural Studies Theory) may be taken as a substitute for CUST 803 (Cultural Studies Past & Present).

2. two additional courses which may be chosen from CUST or selected from elective courses offered by other departments (scroll down to “Courses in Other Units” for selected courses; for a complete listing of available courses, please visit the graduate studies section of each Department’s website.)

All courses are generally completed during the first year of study: two in the fall term + two in the winter term + CUST 802/902 which runs September to April. 

Please note that graduate courses are often timetabled in June and this page will be updated as information becomes available to us.  Class times and locations will also be made available by the department where the courses is offered - please be sure to check the graduate section of their website.

Cultural Studies Courses

CUST 802/902 Cultural Studies Colloquium (6.0 Units).  Required Course.
Jeff Brison
Wednesday, 2:30-5:30pm (Mackintosh-Corry Hall B176 Area - Lecture Theatre - B125)

This course is designed to acquaint graduate students with both current work in the field and various forms of professionalization, through a combination of research presentations and participatory workshops. Students are expected to attend regularly and complete some reflective writing activities. Grading is on a Pass/Fail basis.

CUST 803 Cultural Studies Past & Present (3.0 Units).  Required Course.
Thursday, 11:30am-2:30pm  (Mackintosh-Corry Hall - Room A416)

burcu baba
Scott Rutherford
This course introduces students to the global and interdisciplinary scope of Cultural Studies research practices by surveying key debates, concerns, and texts that have shaped it over time. This includes readings by Stuart Hall, Hazel Carby, Audra Simpson and Carol Boyce Davies, to name a few. Assignments are designed for students to situate their research interests within relevant scholarly and historiographical fields.

CUST 805 Research Creation (3.0 Units)
Dolleen Manning
Tuesday, 2:30-5:30pm (School of Kinesiology and Health Studies Building - Room 105)
This course is designed to support students whose intellectual approach combines creative and academic research practices. The course will value the development of knowledge and innovation through artistic practice, scholarly investigation, and experimentation. Please note that this course is offered primarily as a methods course for Research-Creation practitioners and the main method of evaluation is production of R-C work.

​CUST 807 Settler Colonialism and Incarceration (3.0 Units)
Lisa Guenther
Wednesday, 11:30am-2:30pm (John Watson Hall - Room 207)

Current scholarship on prison abolition tends to focus on the relation between slavery and mass incarceration, but it’s not clear how this framework helps to address the hyper-incarceration of Indigenous peoples in Canada and other settler colonial states. In this seminar, we will study abolitionist (and) decolonial movements with the aim of recovering and co-creating methods for dismantling carceral-colonial institutions and building freer, healthier, and more just communities. Throughout the semester, we will reflect on the map as both a colonial instrument of domination and a creative tool for navigating oppressive structures and sketching concrete alternatives to the world that slavery and colonialism has built. We will also activate our collective power to dream, not as an escapist fantasy but as a critical research method that moves beyond an analysis of what is wrong with the world to experiment with ways of making it better. Readings will include work by Saidiya Hartman, Nick Estes, Robin Kelley, Dionne Brand, and Leanne Simpson.

CUST 802/902 Cultural Studies Colloquium (6.0 Units).  Required Course.
Jeff Brison
Wednesday, 2:30-5:30pm (Mackintosh-Corry Hall B176 Area - Lecture Theatre - B125)

This course is designed to acquaint graduate students with both current work in the field and various forms of professionalization, through a combination of research presentations and participatory workshops. Students are expected to attend regularly and complete some reflective writing activities. Grading is on a Pass/Fail basis.

CUST 800 Cultural Studies Theory (3.0 Units) 
Ali Na
Wednesday, 11:30am-2:30pm (School of Kinesiology and Health Studies Building - Room 105)

CUST 800 Theory unpacks and explores key theories and philosophies relevant to cultural studies, with a focus on critical cultural and minoritarian perspectives. The course will weave between contemporary works and influential intellectual histories. This is a survey course designed to expose students to an array of concepts and schools of thought. We will practice interpreting dense theoretical works while also engaging how these ideas have been institutionalized and to what effects. The course will engage generously with an openness to what the concepts and texts might do and have offered as well as confront the afterlives of theory and criticism, which often include omissions, erasures, and modes of subordination. Concepts include capitalist critique, hegemony, race, feminisms, queerness, post/decoloniality, affect, and intersectionality. Some of the theorists we will explore are Anna Lowenhaupt Tsing, Antonio Gramsci, José Esteban Muñoz, Frantz Fanon, Michel Foucault, Sara Ahmed, and Jennifer Nash. For more information on the instructor for this course, please see Ali Na’s faculty page.

CUST 804 Community-Based Research (3.0 Units)
Reena Kukreja
Monday, 11:30am-2:30pm (Mackintosh-Corry Hall - Room A416)
TBC As cultural producers, activists, and/or researches, Cultural Studies students interact with various communities within, beyond, and on the margins of the academy. This course engages with the theoretical, political, practical, personal, and institutional challenges and opportunities of community-based research.

CUST 892 Special Topics Course: Becoming Science Fictional (3.0 Units)
Glenn Willmott
Thursday, 2:30-5:30pm (John Watson Hall - Room 207)
Science fiction emerged in the early twentieth century as one of the popular, new genres of “pulp” fiction. Pulp was regarded as a non-literary, sensationalist kind of writing produced not for libraries or bookshops but for newsstands and general stores; from the point of view of art, it was beneath serious consideration. Today, science fiction has become one of the preeminent modes of expression in popular as well as literary and experimental media. We are owning up to how fascinated, seduced, and terrified we are—and should be—by our deep entanglement and immersion in occult technologies, in challenging scientific knowledges, and in the many stories we tell ourselves to explain them. This course will explore how science fiction has expressed both symptomatic and more radical imaginings of gender, sexuality, race, ecology, technology, and political economy over the past century. We will focus mainly on theory and works in literature, with some attention to film and television; we will invite discussion and study of other arts, including non-narrative practices in music and fine arts. A provisional syllabus includes literature by Wells, Gilman, Stevens, Moore, Dick, LeGuin, Butler, Yu, and Chiang.

CUST-850 Capstone Project (6.0 units)
Laura Murray
Date and time are TBA.

In this workshop course, MA students will substantially revise or transform work from a previous Queen’s graduate course with the goal of publication or other dissemination, and produce a reflection on professional development activities pursued throughout the year.

CUST 894 Directed Community-Based Practicum
This course is intended to support a student's MA or PhD research through organizational and social experience gained from involvement with relevant off-campus institutions, organizations, and community groups. A CS faculty member will oversee each placement in collaboration with a member of the relevant organization or group.  Please note that practicum courses must be arranged well in advance: do not wait until September.

CUST 895 Agnes Etherington Practicum
Emelie Chhangur, Director and Curator
Alicia Boutilier, Chief Curator/Curator of Canadian Historical Art
Nasrin Himada, Associate Curator of Academic Outreach and Community Engagement
This applied research internship in a professional art museum cultivates understanding of the capacity and disciplinary protocols surrounding research and public presentation of critical cultures within an institutional framework. The focus of the course is a defined research project developed in consultation with the supervising curator and contributing to the Art Centre’s exhibition program or collection development. Practicum students work on-site at the Art Centre 10 hours per week, with additional research hours required. For information on the curatorial direction of our contemporary art program, please refer to the agnes.queensu.ca. Graduate students with relevant education and/or experience in visual and media art or art history in the Cultural Studies Programs at a Masters or Doctoral level are eligible to apply. Those interested should submit a letter of intent describing their goals and areas of interest, a CV and a transcript of their academic record. Admission will be based on interviews, and is contingent on identification of a research project aligned with student research interests and evolving gallery needs. Applications should be submitted well in advance of the desired semester, usually at the beginning of the previous semester to allow for planning. Practica may take place in the fall, winter or spring/summer semester.​  Please note that practicum courses must be arranged well in advance: do not wait until September.

Under the supervision of an individual faculty member, students may conduct intensive reading in a research area not offered in core or elective courses. Readings are to be arranged in consultation with the faculty supervisor, and accompanied by meetings during the term to discuss the readings and submission of written assignments. (This course will be offered when faculty resources are available.)

CUST 990 Directed Studies I
​CUST 991 Directed Studies II
CUST 890 Directed Studies I
CUST 891 Directed Studies II

Cultural Studies micro-courses devote 12 hours to exploring a particular method, moment, or phenomenon and are designed to help students extend theory to current issues, build scholarship, connect research with practice, and gather new tools. The courses are delivered in a condensed format and will be counted as a 1.0 unit course. Micro-courses are graded as pass/fail. For full time graduate students, there is no additional cost to take any of these courses. 


CUST 815 Skilling It

This course offers specialized in-depth instruction in topics related to Cultural Studies Methodology. Not offered in 2022-2023. 


CUST 816 Up Close

This course offers intensive consideration of a major book or work in any medium. Not offered in 2022-2023. 


CUST 817 Signs of the Times

This course offers intensive consideration of an issue or event of contemporary social, political and cultural relevance. Not offered in 2022-2023. 

Courses in Other Units

How do I register in a non-CUST course?

Step 1.  Identify the instructor for any non-CUST elective course that is of interest to you.  Students seeking electives should review the list below and explore other opportunities by reviewing the graduate websites for any departments of interest (i.e., the list below is not always comprehensive). Often, professors will be willing to take a CS student into their course if there is room, and if the student has the appropriate background.

Step 2.  Write to the instructor, by email, with a description of your goals and background, and ask if they will accept you into their course. Please note that the answer may not be certain yet, and may depend on enrollment numbers, but establishing the relationship is the first step.

Step 3.  Once you have approval, you will need to print and complete an Academic Change Form.  Once completed, you will need to sign the form yourself and arrange for it to be signed by (1) the course instructor and (2) your supervisor.  Return the completed, signed form to the Cultural Studies Office in B126B or custgrad@queensu.ca.

You may also wish to check the Department of Art History Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

You may also wish to check the Department of Classics Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

CLAS 816: Greek and Roman Graffiti in Local and Global Contexts
Barbara Reeves
Fall 2022, Tuesday, 3:30-6:30pm (Watson Hall, Room 522)
Ever since humans became cognizant, they have been leaving behind signs commemorating their existence, their thoughts, and their desires. The most diachronically and geographically widespread of such records are graffiti: images, symbols, and texts drawn, painted, scratched, and abraded onto natural and manufactured surfaces that were not originally intended for such messages. The purpose of this course is to examine the graffiti produced by the ancient Greeks, Romans and neighbouring peoples from both a local and a global context. Questions to be addressed include: Who produced graffiti and why? What kinds of graffiti were produced in particular locations? What imagery is common across cultures and what is unique? What can graffiti tell us about cross-cultural interactions? How were graffiti regarded in ancient and modern times? And how should 21st century scholars approach graffiti produced by past or other cultures? This is a graduate seminar incorporating weekly readings, class discussions, reviews of scholarly sources, and a research paper and presentation. Although the focus will be on the ancient Mediterranean, topics will include general discussions of graffiti interpretation, recording, and cultural identity of relevance to all locations and time periods.
Please contact the instructor, Barbara Reeves, for permission to take this course.

 

You may also wish to check the Dan School of Drama and Music Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

MUSC 471 Hip Hop and the Politics of Knowledge
Maya Stitski
Fall 2022, Tuesday, 8:30-11:30am (Ellis Hall, Room 319)
This course analyzes hip hop as theories and systems of knowledge that can re-shape oppressive values, to think and to move toward freedom. By centering the sounds and technologies that artists use to create rap music, in conversation with the philosophies of radical Black traditions, we will explore complex resistance narratives that refuse to relegate Black popular cultures to commodified bodies and lyrics.
Please contact the instructor, Maya Stitski, for permission to take this course.

MUSC 490 Gender and Pop Music
Kip Pegley
Fall 2022
This course is an exploration of gender, sexuality and performativity within Western popular musical practices. Topics to be explored include gender and musical technologies, gender and musical consumption practices, and sonic and visual representations of gender in popular music. A range of musical genres will be studied with a particular emphasis on pop, rock, country, rap and r&b. Students will be encouraged to explore their personal responses to the material and examine their own musical listening practices.  
Please contact the instructor, Kip Pegley, for permission to take this course.

You may also wish to check the Faculty of Education Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

EDUC 804 Creativity in Educational Research and Practice 
Benjamin Bolden
Fall 2022, Thursday, 5:30-8:30pm
In this course students explore how to theorize, support and research creativity in educational contexts. Topics include models of the creative process, theories of creativity, teaching for creativity, motivating creativity, assessing creativity, and conceptualizing creativity research. Course activities will involve leading seminars, responding to key texts and debates, engaging in creative work, and analyzing creative thinking and processes. 
Please contact the instructor, Benjamin Bolden, for permission to take this course.

You may also wish to check the Department of English Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

ENGL 872 The Climate Crisis in Literature Written in Canada 
Petra Fachinger
Fall 2022, Monday, 1:30-4:00pm
This seminar will be concerned with contemporary texts written in Canada that discuss the physical, political, social, and cultural impacts of climate change on specific Canadian regions and populations. While the focus will be on the Canadian context, as the climate crisis affects Canada in unique ways, we will consider diverse and wide-ranging literary responses to climate change in a variety of modes and genres, including the novel, poetry, memoir, and drama. As the texts demonstrate, the discussion of climate emergency is inseparable from issues of social and racial justice and achieving Indigenous climate justice. Climate crisis literature ultimately asks for a necessary cultural shift in an attempt to help save the planet. Our discussion will be informed by various ecocritical approaches, environmental justice studies, and the intersections between environmental humanities and Indigenous studies. 
Please contact the instructor, Petra Fachinger, for permission to take this course.

You may also wish to check the Department of Film and Media Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

SCCS 820 Media Production Seminar
Emily Pelstring
Fall 2022

This course is designed for students with active creative practices. The course will facilitate structured peer feedback opportunities for students as they complete a self-directed project in the medium of their choice. Each student will be expected to take a single project from concept to completion during the semester. The project should be new at the start of the course, and should build on the student’s existing body of work. While students will be self-directed in the technical production of their projects, they will be accountable to the class for an introduction to their creative practice and background, a clear presentation of their production plan, well-prepared in-progress updates, a polished final presentation, and high-quality final documentation. Traditional studio-critique models will be consciously interrogated; students will be asked to reflect on the purpose and benefits of critique, and strive to develop a common language in order to communicate as creative peers with diverse practices and approaches.
There are no official pre-requisites for this class at this time. However, it is recommended that students have one of the following:
a portfolio of creative work; a CV with evidence of creative practice; a transcript with at least one course in any area of creative practice (writing, filmmaking, studio art, drama, music, digital media, dance, etc).
If none of those are available, students who wish to take this course are advised to attend an extra-curricular workshop in media production basics before taking the class.
Please contact the instructor, Emily Pelstring, for permission to take this course.

SCCS 828 Critical Curatorial Studies Seminar
Qanita Lilla
Fall 2022

This graduate seminar course addresses the histories, theories and issues of curatorial practice as a tool of cultural agency and considers evolving paradigms of “the curatorial.” Through critical analysis and engagement with readings and defined case studies, the class will investigate the forces and frameworks that shape the creation and presentation of exhibitions, programs and screenings, ranging across such topics as display formats, material and digital forms of narrative building, local and global circuits of reception, audience-making, resources/markets, festivals, institutional types and collections. Addressing both conceptual frameworks and the political economy of curatorial practice, students will consider the roles of belief systems/values, policy, politics, funding agencies and philanthropists as these impact cultural expression and exchange.

The meaning and usage of the word “curate” has evolved dramatically in recent years, both inside and outside the art world. This course explores the following core questions. What is the role of a curator? How do we best understand curatorial methodologies for the display of objects, experiences and information, and fully exercise their potential in different contexts? And, how do curators negotiate the aesthetic, social, political, physical and economic factors that shape and communicate creative cultural content?
The aim of the seminar is to provide an in-depth understanding of curating today from a range of diverse perspectives. In examining curatorial practices and the material and virtual spaces they activate, students will develop critical visual literacy, as well as the advanced writing, analytical and presentation skills necessary for participation in current discourses and public-facing animation of artistic production.
Please contact the instructor, Qanita Lilla, for permission to take this course.

SCCS 830 Curating in Context
Nasrin Himada
Winter 2023

This production-oriented graduate course explores the development of exhibitions, programs, screenings and collections, with emphasis on drawing out and cultivating their relationship to context. Students will develop advanced understanding of curatorial methods, applied standards and innovative experimentation through projects fusing autonomous creative research, articulation and collaboration. The course offers a modular framework to support and enable students to encounter and experience practical strategies for the successful realization of artistic programs in visual and media arts, an approach applicable to both contemporary and historical works.

Taking advantage of the context of the Agnes Etherington Art Centre’s specialist staff, collections, facilities and artistic networks, students will undertake a guided team-driven project to explore and experience curatorial practice through developing an exhibition, screening, festival program or public-facing extra-mural or online artistic project. The course objective is to provide hands-on experience within an institutional context, while engaging in critical issues of curatorial practice under the instruction of a professional curator.

This course considers the ways in which curators develop, manage and engage with artists, audiences, collections, pragmatic mobilization of resources, aesthetic integrity and expressive potentials, while responding to diverse institutional and non-institutional contexts and histories, as well as geo-political and social conditions. What are the drivers that inform and shape the work of curators today? Through what strategies of curatorial practice can the context of presentation be mobilized?
Please contact the instructor, Nasrin Himada, for permission to take this course.

SCCS 840 Directed Reading
Individual directed reading course under the guidance of a faculty member in an area of the instructor’s expertise. Fall or Winter. Under supervision by a faculty member, Graduate students may conduct intensive reading, curation, or production in an area not offered in core or elective courses that supports graduate research on applications of screen cultures and curatorial studies. Readings and project are to be arranged in consultation with the sponsoring faculty member and joined by meetings during the term to discuss readings and submissions.

SCCS 810 Professional Development in Screen Cultures and Curatorial Studies
Dorit Naaman
Fall/Winter 2022-2023

This course combines professional development, a series of guest speakers, and the possibility for students if they so choose to undertake an internship related to their area of study. Professional development workshops will include sections of grant writing, conference presentation, strategies for the dissemination of their works, production and research ethics, and curriculum development. The course will run on a bi-weekly basis over the course of the academic year, alternating between professional development workshops and visiting speakers in screen cultures and curatorial studies. With the guidance of a supervisor, students will develop their own media practice, curatorial project, practice-based research, or research work, with the goal of realizing their project, and develop a timeline appropriate for the completion of a thesis in a timely manner.
Limited space available - please contact the instructor, Dorit Naaman, for permission to take this course.

SCCS 812 Critical and Theoretical Approaches to Screen Cultures and Curatorial Studies
Ali Na  
Winter 2022

This course examines the key critical and theoretical tenets of screen cultures and curatorial studies. The course shall have both historical and contemporary components in order to situate the student within various fields of debate. We shall not only study film, media and curatorial studies theory in the course, but ask the question “what is theory”? What is its use value, what can theory do, and as importantly, not do? To undertake these questions, we will examine historical and contemporary forms of theory, approaching them not so much as “answers” but as tools that are generative: a form of intellectual creation the allows for the possibility to re-frame assumptions about how film, media, and curation function and circulate with dominant and counter public spheres. We will also ask questions about the relationship between theory as a tool and the art/film/media/exhibition object that it mobilized to advance a given theory. We will take a fairly eclectic approach in terms of case studies, looking at video art, “long” cinema, imaginary curation, experimental media, ethnographic media, advertising, art cinemas, digital media, and documentary. Selected theoretical approaches include psychoanalytic, Marxist, aesthetic, post-colonial, historiographical, feminist, queer, cultural, and ideological approaches to film, media, and curatorial studies, and screen cultures more generally. 
Limited space available - please contact the instructor, Ali Na, for permission to take this course.

SCCS 814 Histories and Methodologies of Screen Cultures and Curatorial Studies
Gabriel Menotti
Fall 2022

This course will provide a sampling of the various roles that a carefully designed methodology can play in production, criticism, and curatorial practices, with a view to expanding the possibilities in students’ research and research-creation projects. The goal is to assist the student in developing innovative but rigorous approaches in their research. We will develop responses to some fundamental questions regarding method. While familiar and clearly defined methodologies have indisputably proven their worth, are there other approaches which might contribute to research results? Is it always best practice to have a single, clearly defined methodology? Is it ever appropriate to entertain several different, and perhaps even competing methodologies in a single project? Can too much attention to controlling methodologies restrict research outcomes?
This course will explore emerging and to some extent experimental methodological approaches: the merging and hybridization of academic and artistic methods (research-creation); how changing views on the role and status of the author can effect method; how the careful use of constraints can paradoxically liberate research results; the relationship between the manifesto, and manifesto-like articulations, effect artistic and critical production, etc.
Limited space available - please contact the instructor, Gabriel Menotti, for permission to take this course.

You may also wish to check the Department of Gender Studies Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

GNDS 801 Theories in Gender Studies
Elizabeth Brulé
Fall 2022, Thursday, 2:30-5:30pm (Jeffery Hall, Room 319)       
 
This interdisciplinary seminar provide a comprehensive overview of contemporary theories in gender studies and in such fields as critical race, feminist, women's, queer or trans studies. The seminar will examine the development  and application of theories as well as debates surrounding them. Readings and discussions will draw from both the social sciences and the humanities. 
Please contact the instructor, Elizabeth Brulé, for permission to take this course.

GNDS 802 Methodologies in Gender Studies    
Margaret Little
Fall 2022, Tuesday, 11:30am-2:30pm (Jeffery Hall, Room 319)

This interdisciplinary seminar examines historical and contemporary methodological approaches in gender studies and in such fields as critical race, feminist, women's, queer or trans studies. Readings and discussions emphasize research possibilities that are opened b connecting multiple academic disciplines and diverse local-global perspectives. A goal of the seminar is to understand how researchers can engage in non-oppressive politics of knowledge production and how knowledge can be utilized within processes of social change.
Please contact the instructor, Margaret Little, for permission to take this course.

GNDS 810 Black Geographies    
Katherine McKittrick
Winter 2023, Wednesday, 2:30-5:30pm (John Watson, Room 207)

This course situates the spaces and places of the Americas and the black diaspora in relation slave and post-slave geographies. It closely reads black studies theorists, as well as creative texts, and thinks about the ways in which ongoing plantocratic and racial logics shape the production of space, geographic thought, anti-colonial practices, and analytics of liberation.
Please contact the instructor, Katherine McKittrick, for permission to take this course.

GNDS 815 Proseminar: Professional Development in Gender Studies
Erin Clow
Fall/Winter, Wednesday, 11:30am-2:30pm (John Watson, Room 401)

Course advances knowledge and skills supporting professional development of gender studies graduate students. Topics include development of teaching, research, scholarship, publishing, and academic and non-academic careers. Includes visiting researcher seminars and training and preparation of funding and employment applications. Graded Pass/Fail. 
Please contact the instructor, Erin Clow, for permission to take this course.

GNDS 820  Special Topics: Writing Ethnography
Scott Morgensen
Fall 2022, Friday, 11:30am-2:30pm
This interdisciplinary seminar introduces the practices of reading and writing ethnographic texts. We approach ethnography as a method of social research based in relational praxes of inquiry and interpretation, and we read ethnographic writing as a method of representation with styles that may be studied and practiced creatively. Course materials revisit the history of ethnography (concentrated in anthropology and sociology) and teach the research methods modeled by feminist ethnography and queer/trans ethnography, as these arise in relation to traditions of Black feminist anthropology, Indigenous women’s ethnography, postcolonial ethnography, and the networks of ethnographers Jafari Sinclaire Allen and Ryan Jobson refer to as “the decolonizing generation.” (Allen and Jobson 2016) Students will learn to identify and analyze narrative evidence of ethnographic representation in the form, ethics, and compositional innovations of ethnographic essays, monographs, and films. Students will gain understanding of the stakes in conducting and writing ethnography from the vantages of the scholars we study and of their own research and writing experience. For their final project, students will apply their learning by creating an ethnographic text based on original research: either by participating in the course’s GREB pre-approved research activity, or -- if a student has conducted GREB-approved ethnographic research for their graduate degree -- by preparing new writing from their research. 
Please contact the instructor, Scott Morgensen, for permission to take this course. 

GNDS 821 Special Topics: Gender, Invisible Policy, and Leadership
Karen Lawford
Winter 2023, Tuesday, 8:30-11:30am (John Watson, Room 207) 

Seminars focus on specific topics related to gender studies under the guidance of a faculty member in an area of the instructor’s expertise.
Please contact the instructor, Karen Lawford, for permission to take this course.

GNDS 822 Special Topics: Feminisms, Class, and Socioeconomic Justice
Melissa Houghtaling
Winter    2023, Monday, 11:30am-2:30pm (Botterell Hall, Room B148) 

Seminars focus on specific topics related to gender studies under the guidance of a faculty member in an area of the instructor’s expertise.
Please contact the instructor, Melissa Houghtaling, for permission to take this course.

GNDS 830 Trans Literatures/Theories
Trish Salah
Winter 2023, Tuesday, 11:30am-2:30pm (John Watson, Room 207)

This seminar is a graduate level introduction to transnational trans literatures and studies. It provides a foundation in the aesthetic, political and epistemological projects of trans literature, art and theory and will contextualize them historically and in relation to non-binary, transsexual, Two Spirit and non-Western “transgender” cultural production and knowledges.
Please contact the instructor, Trish Salah, for permission to take this course.

GNDS 831 Debates on Feminism and Islam    
burcu baba
Fall 2022, Friday, 11:30am-2:30pm (Humphrey Hall, Room 131)

This course focuses on the theories, political activities, and organizing of Islamic feminists. It situates itself in relation to contemporary debates around the status of women in Islam and problematizes the nature of feminism and its assumed relationship to Islam. The course will focus on questions of religion, race, class, and nationalism in relation to Islam and Muslim women.
Please contact the instructor, burcu baba, for permission to take this course.

GNDS 838 Institutional Ethnography    
Elizabeth Brulé
Winter 2023, Thursday, 11:30am-2:30pm (Jeffery Hall, Room 319)

Developed by feminist sociologist Dorothy E. Smith, Institutional Ethnography (IE) is a method of inquiry that begins in the everyday world of people and analyzes how institutional processes frame people’s social relations and interactions with one another. The course examines the theory that informs IE, discusses its core concepts and procedures, and provides opportunities for practice.
Please contact the instructor, Elizabeth Brulé, for permission to take this course.

GNDS 839 Writing the Body    
Juliane Okot Bitek
Winter    2023, Monday 2:30-5:30pm (John Watson, Room 401)    
Please contact the instructor, Juliane Okot Bitek, for permission to take this course.

GNDS 903 Applications of Gender Studies
Scott Morgensen
Winter 2023, Friday, 11:30am-2:30pm (Mackintosh-Corry Hall, Room C420)

Examines critical theories of applications of gender studies research within work for social change. Themes include power in research and representation, researcher responsibilities, academic and nonacademic research, research careers, and community-based research. Students plan applications of original research, and evaluate plans by utilizing critical theories of application.
Please contact the instructor, Scott Morgensen, for permission to take this course.

You may also wish to check the Department of Geography and Planning Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

You may also wish to check the Department of Global Development Studies Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

DEVS 492-0/870 Tourism in Transition
Marc Epprecht

Fall 2022
In 2019 tourism accounted for 10-11% of employment globally. For some countries, its promotion has been the principal development strategy, with noteworthy successes achieved over the past few decades. Compelling critiques of tourism’s environmental, cultural, unequal economic and other harmful impacts, as well as rapid changes in technology and in tourist demography, were giving rise both to new harms (such as “overtourism,” “Instagram death” – next up, space tourism) and new strategies to mitigate them (including “community-based” and “eco-tourism”). COVID-19 largely shut down the industry with devastating impacts in tourism-dependent economies. But it also sparked creative initiatives to re-think tourism as a sustainable, social justice-oriented development strategy. This course critically assesses the history and explores contemporary practices of tourism planning for a post-pandemic, climate crisis, “new normal” world.
Please contact the instructor, Marc Epprecht, for permission to take this course.  

DEVS 811 Social Reproduction, Care Work, and Development
Rebecca Hall
Winter 2023, Thursday, 11:30am-2:30pm (Kingston Hall - Room 112)

Who cares? And how and where do they do it, under what conditions, and for what purposes? While concepts like “work” and “economy” are usually associated with production or services oriented towards profit generation, a huge proportion of unpaid and paid labour worldwide is oriented towards social reproduction and care. In this seminar, we make these labours the centre of our analysis of global development. Social reproduction refers to the paid and unpaid labour that maintains and reproduces people and communities on a daily and intergenerational basis. We will ask how social reproduction is structured by local and transnational political economies, and how it shapes these economies, in turn. We will trace contemporary transnational flows of reproductive labour (for example, migrant care workers) and bodily capacities (for example, transnational surrogacy), and how they are shaping social reproduction locally and globally. We will also ask what future economies that privilege care might look like, examining the role of care in confronting racial capitalism, supporting Indigenous resurgence, and the “Just Transitions”/ “Build Back Better” movements.
Please contact devs.grad@queensu.ca for permission to take this course.  

DEVS 813 State, Society and Alternatives to Development
Diana Córdoba 
Winter 2023, Monday, 11:30am-2:30pm (Walter Light Hall - Room 212)

Do you believe that the state is so controlled by capitalism that even where nominally democratic institutions exist, there is little hope for real change without radical transformation? Or do you believe that the state can be gradually reformed in a more egalitarian direction through social democratic policies? This seminar will explore the variety of theoretical and political positions within these two extremes of radical reform and no reform of capitalism and the alternatives to development within and beyond the state. We will first develop the theoretical tools to understand the nature of the state in capitalist society. We will then explore actual experiments and visions of development that have grown and flourished within and outside the framework of the state in different parts of the world and especially in Latin America. Specific cases will include solidarity economies, worker cooperatives, participatory budgeting, transnational agroecology, collective land ownership and state collective enterprises.
Please contact devs.grad@queensu.ca for permission to take this course.  

DEVS 815 Global Health
Kilian Atuoye
Winter 2023, Wednesday, 11:30am-2:30pm (Walter Light Hall - Room 212)

This course will introduce students to current global health issues with the aim of providing a solid foundation for future careers in Global Health. The course is structured in three parts. The first part will discuss key theories, concepts, and principles of Global Health. In the second part, students will critically examine health risks, changing trends and distribution of diseases, disease burden and impacts, at individual and population levels in high- and low-income countries. Case studies covering infectious, non-communicable diseases, and mental health will provide good grounds for discussing these aspects of Global Health. The final part of the course will guide students to explore practical ways of addressing contemporary global health challenges in the ever-evolving global political economy. Ultimately, this course will enhance students’ critical thinking about Global Health, global health challenges, and how to contribute towards improving health and wellbeing across the world. 
Please contact devs.grad@queensu.ca for permission to take this course.  

You may also wish to check the Department of History Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

HIST 831 Empires and Intimacies
Karen Dubinsky
Fall 2022, Monday, 2:30-5:30pm
This course explores the transnational “emotional economy”: that is, familial and intimate relations of power created in and by empires, in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The readings are thematic and interdisciplinary, drawn from national and transnational contexts, primarily in the Americas. Topics include colonial knowledge formation, tourism, visual cultures, racialization, sexual politics and other bonds of affect.
Please contact the instructor, Karen Dubinsky, for permission to take this course.  

You may also wish to check the School of Environmental Studies and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

ENSC 801 Methodological and Conceptual Basis For Environmental Studies
Ryan Danby & Allison Goebel 
The course examines methodological and conceptual issues arising from Environmental Studies’ position as an inter / multi / trans-disciplinary practice. It will focus on the inherent difficulties in overcoming disciplinary fragmentation in approaches to studying complex issues in environmental sustainability that require integrated understandings of the relations between social and natural systems. The course will promote methodological literacy beyond students’ own area of expertise, develop critical and reflexive thinking about how environmental studies might approach issues of sustainability, and encourage and facilitate communication across disciplinary paradigms. The course precedes and complements ENSC 802, familiarizing students with the historical origins, philosophical underpinnings and practical deployment of key approaches within the social and natural sciences and humanities. The course also supports the development of methodological and literature elements of students’ own thesis projects. 
Please contact the instructor, Allison Goebel, for permission to take this course.   

You may also wish to check the School of Kinesiology and Health Studies and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

KHS 873 Critical Methodologies: Politics of Knowledge
Elaine Power
Fall 2022
This seminar explores the politics of knowledge in research that aims at social change. Taking a historical approach, it draws on feminism, Indigenous Studies, post-colonialism, and other critical perspectives to develop a frame for critical, interpretive qualitative research.
Please contact the instructor, Elaine Power, for permission to take this course.

You may also wish to check the Faculty of Law Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

You may also wish to check the Department of Philosophy and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

PHIL 441/841 Twentieth Century Philosophy
Lisa Guenther
Winter 2023
Topic: Critical Phenomenology. Phenomenology is a philosophical practice of reflecting on the transcendental structures that make lived experience possible and meaningful.  It begins by bracketing the natural attitude, or the naïve assumption that the world exists apart from consciousness, and “reducing” this everyday experience of the world to the basic structures that constitute its meaning and coherence.  In this sense, phenomenology points us in a critical direction.  But where classical phenomenology remains insufficiently critical is in failing to give an equally rigorous account of how contingent historical and social structures also shape our experience, not just empirically or in a piecemeal fashion, but in a way that is so fundamental, we could call it quasi-transcendental.  Structures such as patriarchy, white supremacy, and heteronormativity permeate, organize, and reproduce the natural attitude in ways that go beyond any particular object of thought.  They are not things to be seen, but rather ways of seeing, and even ways of making the world that go unnoticed without a sustained practice of critical reflection to make them visible.  In this seminar, we will learn the basic concepts of classical phenomenology and explore the possibilities for critical phenomenology in the work of Frantz Fanon, Sara Ahmed, Gayle Salamon, Alia Al-Saji, and others.
Please contact the instructor, Lisa Guenther, for permission to take this course.

PHIL 445 Major Figures 
Jacqueline Davies
Fall 2022
This seminar offers an introduction to the work of 20th century philosopher Emmanuel Levinas (1906-1995), focussed on a careful reading of his first major book Totality and Infinity. We consider, for example, what it means to think ethics phenomenologically, what Levinas meant by “ethics as first philosophy” and the significance of the encounter with “the face of the Other.” Our study of the primary text will be supplemented by introductory level secondary sources, interviews with Levinas, and lectures situating his work in relation to other major figures, especially of 20th century European philosophy (e.g., Husserl, Heidegger, Buber), as well as Plato and Descartes. Our major emphasis is on advanced philosophical reading skills, expository writing, and deep engagement with the themes explored. 
Please contact the instructor, Jacqueline Davies, for permission to take this course.

You may also wish to check the Department of Political Studies and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

You may also wish to check the Department of Psychology Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

You may also wish to check the School of Religion Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.

RELS 888 Critical Ethnographies in Religious Studies
Shobhana Xavier
Fall 2022, Thursday, 11:30am-1:30pm
This seminar explores the processes of writing about culture and religion through the methodology of ethnography. Despite “religion’s” elusive nature, various scholars, such as anthropologists, sociologists, and religious studies scholars continue to produce ethnographies of diverse religious communities. Yet, how does an ethnographer’s location, identities, accessibilities, theoretical leanings, and experiences in the field and beyond inform their data collection and knowledge productions? With such questions in mind, this course aims to explore some of these ethnographic productions of the study of religion and culture. In our investigations we consider how the writer’s journey to the field, in the field, and return home, have all influenced what they have produced and how they have produced.
Please contact the instructor, Shobhana Xavier, for permission to take this course.

You may also wish to check the Department of Sociology Website and/or the websites of affiliated faculty members for courses of interest that are not yet listed here.