Department of Gender Studies

Department of Gender Studies
Department of Gender Studies

Graduate Courses


Course Descriptions

Core Courses
GNDS 801/3.0 Theories in Gender Studies (Fall 2021; in-person)

Course Outline
Instructor
: Trish Salah

Description: This interdisciplinary seminar provide a comprehensive overview of contemporary theories in gender studies and in such fields as critical race, feminist, women's, queer or trans studies. The seminar will examine the development  and application of theories as well as debates surrounding them. Readings and discussions will draw from both the social sciences and the humanities. Required of Gender Studies graduate students.

GNDS 802/3.0 Methodologies in Gender Studies (Fall 2021; in-person)

Course Outline
Instructor
: Margaret Little

Description: This interdisciplinary seminar examines historical and contemporary methodological approaches in gender studies and in such fields as critical race, feminist, women's, queer or trans studies. Readings and discussions emphasize research possibilities that are opened b connecting multiple academic disciplines and diverse local-global perspectives. A goal of the seminar is to understand how researchers can engage in non-oppressive politics of knowledge production and how knowledge can be utilized within processes of social change. Required of Gender Studies graduate students.

GNDS 815/0.0 Proseminar: Professional Development in Gender Studies (Fall and Winter 2021-22; in-person)

Course Outline
Instructor
: TBA

Description: Course advances knowledge and skills supporting professional development of gender studies graduate students. Topics include development of teaching, research, scholarship, publishing, and academic and non-academic careers. Includes visiting researcher seminars and training and preparation of funding and employment applications. Graded Pass/Fail. 

GNDS 903/3.0 Applications of Gender Studies (Winter 2022; remote)

Course Outline
Instructor
: Katherine McKittrick

Description: Examines critical theories of applications of gender studies research within work for social change. Themes include power in research and representation, researcher responsibilities, academic and nonacademic research, research careers, and community-based research. Students plan applications of original research, and evaluate plans by utilizing critical theories of application.

Note: This course is only open to Gender Studies PhD Students.

GNDS 950/3.0 PhD Practicum (Fall and Winter 2021-22)

Description: A student and PhD supervisor design a course of research with partners at a site of application of the doctoral research project. Students examine scholarship on practica and research applications that are relevant to the research topic and site, and develop new knowledge in collaboration with research partners. The practicum design must align with the program degree learning expectations.

Elective Courses
GNDS 810/3.0 Black Geographies/Abolition Geographies (Fall 2021; remote)

Course Outline (draft)
Instructors
: Katherine McKittrick and Ruth Wilson Gilmore

Description: Students will read a range of texts that attend to black studies, black geographies, and practices of liberation. Three-term hours. 

GNDS 820-001/3.0 Special Topics in Gender Studies: Abolition Feminisms (Winter 2022; in-person)

Instructor: Vanessa Thompson

Description: Seminars focus on specific topics related to gender studies under the guidance of a faculty member in an area of the instructor’s expertise.

GNDS 820-002/3.0 Special Topics in Gender Studies: Black Atlantic Exchanges (Winter 2022; in-person)

Instructor: Daniel McNeil

Description: This course explores some of the discrepant and even contrary meanings of exchange. It considers how creative artists have borrowed and appropriated forms, styles and genres to release new political and cultural possibilities. It maps some of the ideas, strategies and struggles that have overflowed from the containers of the nation-state and informed the political aspirations and achievements of Black Atlantic cultures. It invites careful reading and intentional listening to Black Atlantic intellectuals who gather – in conversations, conferences and other venues – to build solidarity, connect with kindred spirits, learn through disagreements, and debate the boundaries of ‘polite’ or ‘acceptable’ discourse. It asks how we might make abstract ideas about modernity and coloniality legible, audible and visible to reading publics fractured along the experiential fault lines of gender, race, and class. It examines the capaciousness of Black cultural productions that, while often acquired through capitalist exchange and seemingly solitary acts, can also provide resources to construct an anti-capitalist political stance and transcend or contest capitalist systems of judgment and value. Some of the artists, intellectuals and collectives that will be helping us to think about Black Atlantic exchanges in this course include the Black Audio Film Collective, the Black Public Sphere Collective, Aimé Césaire, Angela Davis, bell hooks, Langston Hughes, Paul Gilroy, Lewis Gordon, Stuart Hall, Saidiya Hartman, Richard Iton, Achille Mbembe, Toni Morrison, Fred Moten, Adrian Piper, Gil Scott-Heron, and the Race and Politics Group at the Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies.  

GNDS 821-001/3.0 Special Topics in Gender Studies: Social Movements/Social Justice (Winter 2022; in-person)

Instructor: Scott Morgensen

Description: Seminars focus on specific topics related to gender studies under the guidance of a faculty member in an area of the instructor’s expertise.

GNDS 821-002/3.0 Gender, Invisible Policy, and Leadership (Winter 2022; remote)

Course Outline
Instructor
: Karen Lawford

Description: Throughout the course, students will examine the interplay between Gender, Invisible Policy, and Leadership within a variety of workplace environments. To facilitate a comprehensive understanding and recognition of the interconnection of the three components, each student will focus on an area of interest related to their MA/PhD research. Topics will be chosen in consultation with the instructor. A goal of this seminar is to appreciate the diverse and practical applications of a Gender Studies graduate degree.

GNDS 831/3.0 Debates on Feminism and Islam (not offered in 2021-22)

Description: This course focuses on the theories, political activities, and organizing of Islamic feminists. It situates itself in relation to contemporary debates around the status of women in Islam and problematizes the nature of feminism and its assumed relationship to Islam. The course will focus on questions of religion, race, class, and nationalism in relation to Islam and Muslim women.

Exclusion: GNDS 401

GNDS 832/3.0 Gender and Poverty (not offered in 2021-22)

Description: This course is designed to provide an in-depth exploration of poverty issues in Canada. It includes discussions about working poor and welfare poor and addresses how race and sexuality can compound the issues of poverty. The course will also acknowledge how poor people are actively engaged in attempting to improve their lives through antipoverty organizing.

Exclusion: GNDS 421

GNDS 833/3.0 Towards the Human: Race and the Politics of Expression (not offered in 2021-22)

Description: This interdisciplinary seminar will explore the ways in which modernity shapes cultural ‘difference’ and ‘the human'. Readings will focus on the racial and geographic contours of colonialism, transatlantic slavery and The Enlightenment in order to bring into focus communities that challenge racial-sexual categorization through creative expression (music, fiction, poetry, and visual art as well as theory).

Exclusion: GNDS 427

GNDS 834/3.0 Gender Performance (not offered in 2021-22)

Description: This seminar addresses some of the many meanings and manifestations of ‘gender performance’ in literature and popular culture. Primary sources include a wide variety of media - novels, plays, poems, films, magazines and cartoons. Primary material will be balanced with careful consideration of work in areas such as feminist theory, identity politics, queer and performance theory.

Exclusion: GNDS 428

GNDS 835/3.0 Settler Colonialism and Indigenous Politics (Fall 2021; in-person)

Course Outline
Instructor
: Elizabeth Brulé

Description: Examines critical theories and case studies of politics and governance in Indigenous and settler societies, based in Indigenous feminist thought. Cases examine the relation between nationality, gender, and sexuality within colonial relations of rule, methods of Indigenous governance, Indigenous sovereignty struggles, and theories and practices of decolonization.

Exclusion: GNDS 432

GNDS 836/3.0 Feminist and Queer Ethnography (Fall 2021; in-person)

Course Outline
Instructor
: Ayca Tomac

Description: Examines the critical theories, methods, and products of feminist ethnography and queer ethnography, which we approach as unique subfields, areas of inquiry, genres of writing,and ethical methods within research and social life. Topics include historical formations of ethnography and of anti-colonial and anti-racist ethnographic criticism; adaptations of ethnography to trans, queer, and feminist work; and ethnography’s theoretical and methodological importance to gender studies.

Exclusion: GNDS 445

GNDS 837/3.0 Race and Gender in Modern US History (not offered in 2021-22)

Description: This course examines race, gender, and their intersections through a focus on modern African American history. Topics include: gender in the post-Emancipation era; the law, racist science and racialization; racial and sexual violence and Jim Crow; the Great Migration, the New Negro and the Harlem Renaissance; mass consumption; the modern civil rights movement; and, from Black feminism to Black Liberation.This course examines race, gender, and their intersections through a focus on modern African American history. Topics include: gender in the post-Emancipation era; the law, racist science and racialization; racial and sexual violence and Jim Crow; the Great Migration, the New Negro and the Harlem Renaissance; mass consumption; the modern civil rights movement; and, from Black feminism to Black Liberation.

Exclusion: HIST 817

GNDS 838/3.0 Institutional Ethnography (Winter 2022; in-person)

Course Outline
Instructor
: Elizabeth Brulé

Description: Developed by feminist sociologist Dorothy E. Smith, Institutional Ethnography (IE) is a method of inquiry that begins in the everyday world of people and analyzes how institutional processes frame people’s social relations and interactions with one another. The course examines the theory that informs IE, discusses its core concepts and procedures, and provides opportunities for practice.

GNDS 840/3.0 and 841/3.0 Directed Reading (Fall and Winter 2021-22)

Description: Under the supervision of an individual faculty member, MA students may conduct intensive reading in a research area not offered in core or elective courses. Readings are to be arranged in consultation with the faculty supervisor, and accompanied by meetings during the term to discuss reading and submission of written assignments.

Note: MA students may take a maximum of two Gender Studies Directed Readings (numbered GNDS 840 and GNDS 841) while completing their degrees. 

GNDS 850/3.0 Practicum: Engaging Feminist Activism (Fall and Winter 2021-22)

Description: Under the supervision of an individual faculty member, MA and PhD students may design a course of study on a topic related to community engagement and activism while simultaneously being placed in community-based and/or activist work. Students will analyse interdisciplinary and feminist approaches to community-based and activist knowledge, including knowledge presented by their practicum partners, and then integrate this knowledge and their accountable relationship with their partners into their research.

GNDS 898/3.0 Major Research Paper (Fall and Winter 2021-22)

Description: An intensive required written project based on student’s own research questions, which is comprised of two major components: either two chapters of a single coherent work, or a two-part portfolio.

Prerequisite: Students must complete Gender Studies 801/3.0, Gender Studies 802/3.0, and four elective courses in Gender Studies or in any other department to enrol in GNDS 898.

GNDS 899 Master's Thesis Research

Description: An intensive required written project based on student’s own research questions, which is comprised of a number of chapters that form a single coherent work.

Prerequisite: Students must complete Gender Studies 801/3.0 and two elective courses in Gender Studies or another department to enroll in GNDS 899.

GNDS 940/3.0 and 941/3.0 Directed Reading (Fall, Winter, Spring/Summer)

Description: Under the supervision of an individual faculty member, PhD students may conduct intensive reading in a research area not offered in core or elective courses. Readings are to be arranged in consultation with the faculty supervisor, and accompanied by meetings during the term to discuss reading and submission of written assignments.

Note: PhD students may take a maximum of two Gender Studies Directed Readings (numbered GNDS 940 and GNDS 941) while completing their degrees. 

GNDS 999 Independent Doctoral Research

Assigned to PhD students who are conducting independent doctoral research


Other Information

Advanced Undergraduate Seminars in Gender Studies

Graduate students may ask instructors of advanced undergraduate seminars in Gender Studies (400-series courses) for permission to participate by enrolling in a parallel graduate Directed Reading (GNDS 840/841). While the precise workload graduate students must complete in such courses is determined by the instructor, generally it entails attendance at all seminar meetings and completion of additional coursework equivalent to a graduate seminar.

400-series courses offered in 2021-22: GNDS 410/3.0 Writing the Body (Winter 2022), GNDS 480/3.0 BLCK Special Topics: Journeys through the Black Atlantic (Fall 2021)

Limit on Directed Readings

MA students may take a maximum of two Gender Studies Directed Readings (numbered GNDS 840 and GNDS 841) while completing their degrees. 

Graduate Courses in Other Departments

Students are invited to research the titles, descriptions and term offerings of graduate courses in other departments at Queen’s University. Neither the university nor the Faculty of Arts and Sciences publishes a master list of graduate courses, so students should independently investigate offerings from departments of interest.

To request a seat in a graduate course in another department, contact the course instructor and request a meeting or a discussion over email to determine whether the course will inform your MA research project. Instructor permission is required before you may enroll in any course in another department