Current Course Offerings

This list is subject to revision. Schedules for courses that are co-taught with undergraduate courses will be available in July when the University releases the 2021-2021 Timetable. Courses that are for graduate students only will be scheduled after the University Timetable is released, and throughout the summer as instructor and student schedules are arranged.

Fall 2021

RELS 800 - Professional Development Seminar    

Monthly seminar series for building graduate students¿ professional academic and alt-academic skills through workshops, Q&As, and presentations about topics including: publishing, conferencing, funding, applying for further graduate study or employment, etc. Topics will be timed to the appropriate point in the cycle of each academic year (i.e. sessions on SSHRC and OGS will occur early in Fall semester). This is a mandatory course. This course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis.

RELS 801 - Core Course I: Religion and Modernity      

Examines the nature of religious transition in response to various pressures for religious change.

RELS 806 - AI, Biohacking, and Technology (RELS 306)

This course looks at issues raised by the intersection of religion and human enhancement technologies. We will consider categories of biohacking, AI, and possible future technologies including mind uploading. You will have the opportunity to probe the growing transhumanist movement and engage diverse religious issues. We will consider what it means to be human and where we want to go with technology that might make us “better.” Ethical issues including social justice and what it might mean to live forever will be debated.

RELS 826 - Religion and Politics in Muslim Societies (RELS 326)

Explores the role of religion in the politics of Muslim societies with particular attention to the modern period.

RELS 831 - Religion and Violence (RELS 331)

Links between violence and religious beliefs, practices, and institutions; for example, sacrifice, holy wars, scapegoating, and suicide. 

RELS 888 -  Critical Ethnographies in the Study of Religion 

The course will engage in the theory and method of ethnography as it has been used in the study of religion. It will engage with various examples of ethnographic case studies, particularly as they interrogate questions of insider/outsider positionalities while exploring ways in which gender, sexuality and race, trauma and safety have been negotiated in various field work projects by religious studies scholars.

 

Winter 2022

RELS 800 - Professional Development Seminar    

Monthly seminar series for building graduate students¿ professional academic and alt-academic skills through workshops, Q&As, and presentations about topics including: publishing, conferencing, funding, applying for further graduate study or employment, etc. Topics will be timed to the appropriate point in the cycle of each academic year (i.e. sessions on SSHRC and OGS will occur early in Fall semester). This is a mandatory course. This course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis.

RELS 802 - Theory and Method in Religious Studies     
Looks at recent articulations and applications of theories and methods in Religious Studies.

RELS 806 - The Physics if Womanism (RELS 301)
A topic of current interest in Religious Studies not covered in other available courses.

RELS 807 - Race, Ethnicity, and Religion (RELS 332)

The course will explore the intersection of race, ethnicity, and religion, alongside gender, sexuality, culture and more. It will challenge students to think about how racial identities, theories, and movements implicate(d) the way religious communities construct their own systems and worldviews.

RELS 809 - Things and beings in Indigenous ontologies 

By tracing material and immaterial "things" we can find in Indigenous cosmologies and practices we are going to address the question of whether or not “things” exist in indigenous worlds and what their forms of existence would be. The validity of dichotomies such as subject/object, human/non-human, or Nature/Culture will be assessed and criticized in order to grasp the  Indigenous ontological status of what the West labels as animals, spirits, plants, objects, and “things” in general.

RELS 887 - Problems in Ancient Mediterranean Religions

An interdisciplinary study of the religions and mythical traditions of Mediterranean and Near Eastern cultures from the Bronze Age to Late Antiquity. Topics will vary according to instructor. The course will have special regard for, but not be limited to, the Levant, and the Greek and Roman world.

RELS 897 - Judaism in the Modern Age (RELS 398)

The development of modern Jewish religious thought and practice, including the Reform, Orthodox, Conservative and Reconstructionist  movements.  The consequences of the Holocaust and the establishment of the modern state of Israel.

More information about our graduate courses can be found in the School of Graduate Studies Academic Calendar.