Department of Political Studies

Department of Political Studies
Department of Political Studies

Colloquium in Legal and Political Philosophy - Kristen Rundle (University of Melbourne)

Founded in Fall 2015, the Colloquium is an initiative by the Faculty of Law, the Department of Philosophy, and the Department of Political Studies. It consists of a series of seminars and workshops within the broad ambit of the Colloquium’s mandate. Students registered with the course meet with the Colloquium convenors to discuss a recent paper by a leading scholar. The following week, the students meet with the author, along with other faculty members and invited guests, for a workshop about the paper.

The Colloquium’s aim is to promote closer collaboration between legal, philosophical, and political studies, by bringing together students and faculty from these overlapping disciplines to engage in rigorous intellectual engagement. The Colloquium contributes to the Queen’s Collaborative Program in Political and Legal Thought.

In Fall 2020, the Colloquium convenors are Professor Jean Thomas and Professor Grégoire Webber. The Colloquium is funded by Professor Webber's Canada Research Chair in Public Law and Philosophy of Law.

Further to decision of the University that the Fall 2020 semester be held remotely for the majority of students, all Colloquium sessions listed below will be hosted remotely. 

All members of the Queen's community are welcome to attend the workshops and are invited to communicate with the convenors in order to receive information on how to do so.


Monday, November 30, 2020 (3:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.)

Catherine LuKristen Rundle (University of Melbourne)

Kristen Rundle joined Melbourne Law School in 2015 and teaches in the areas of administrative law and legal theory. She became the Co-Director of the Centre for Comparative Constitutional Studies in December 2016. Kristen previously held appointments at the London School of Economics and Political Science, the University of New South Wales and the University of Sydney, as well as adjunct, visiting and honorary appointments at the University of Toronto, Erasmus University, the University of Ottawa, and the Whitlam Institute, Western Sydney University.

Kristen's research is located at the intersection of legal theory and public law in its effort to trace the conditions necessary for law to act as a limitation on power. Led by her work in legal philosophy on the intellectual legacy of the legal philosopher, Lon Fuller, Kristen's interest in interactions between legal forms and human agency has also informed her research into the connections between law and the Holocaust, her work on the legal and institutional attributes of the British child migration program, and her ongoing inquiry into questions of theory and practice arising from the neoliberal redesign of the administrative state, especially with respect to contracted-out public functions.

 

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