Queen's Accessibility Hub

 

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Accessible Event and Meeting Planning

Accessible Meeting/Event Checklist (PDF 513 KB)

This document is available in alternate formats upon request. Please contact the Accessibility Coordinator.

Why make events and meetings accessible?

Just as with documents, websites, or emails; you want to ensure what you are planning is experienced equally and enjoyed by all. This tutorial will show you many things (many low-cost and no-cost things) you can do to make your event more inclusive. When planning an event, please consider the checklist to ensure that your event or meeting is accessible to all your participants. The checklist involves 3 steps you need to consider:

Step 1: Before your event or meeting

Step 2: During the event or meeting

Step 3: After the event or meeting

Please review this checklist during the initial planning stage. Any accessibility related costs should be included in the overall event budget.

Remember - accessibility is not just about addressing existing barriers...it's also important to anticipate potential barriers. Accommodation is often simple, inexpensive and ensures persons with disabilities have equal opportunity to fully participate in your event or meeting.

By creating an inclusive event from the start you:

  • Reduce the need for individual accommodations which (while necessary) can be costly and time-consuming if done at the last minute.
  • You make the event more inclusive and accessible for all participants - whether they have identified a disability to you or not.
  • Ensure full participation for a wider range of attendees you create a better experience for all.

Booking Translation, Interpretation and American Sign Language (ASL)

Whether for an event, a meeting, or a job interview; you or your department may receive a request for an ASL Interpreter that you can book through different sources.

  • Queen's Strategic Procurement Service (SPS) maintains a detailed preferred vendors lists.  Queen's University has entered into Vendor of Record agreements for various goods and services and has an Ontario Education Collaborative Marketplace (OECM) agreement with a company providing Translation, Interpretation and American Sign Language (ASL) for events and meetings.
  • The Canadian Hearing Society (CHS) Interpreting Services provides interpreters that are professionally trained in sign language and knowledgeable in the language and culture of both Deaf and hearing people. They provide communication in American Sign Language (ASL)- English, or la langue des signes québécoise (LSQ)- French. The Canadian Hearing Society - Kingston office.

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