Deputy Provost (Academic Operations and Inclusion): Dr. Teri Shearer


In her role as deputy provost (academic operations and inclusion), Dr. Teri Shearer works closely with Queen’s senior management team to advance the academic, operational, and equity goals of the university. Among her responsibilities, Dr. Shearer plays a leadership role in overseeing academic appointments, chairing the Senate Committee on Academic Development, overseeing the university’s response to the Principal’s Implementation Committee on Racism, Diversity, and Inclusion (PICRDI) report, and advancing equity, diversity, and inclusion initiatives on campus.

Dr. Shearer joined Queen’s University in 1996 upon completion of her PhD at the University of Iowa. Her research focuses on the social and behavioural consequences of accounting practices, and her papers have appeared in some of the top journals in this field. Prior to her appointment as Deputy Provost in January 2016, Dr. Shearer served as Associate Dean of Faculty and Associate Professor at Queen’s Smith School of Business. 

Dr. Shearer is available to meet with students, staff, and faculty to discuss matters of inclusivity on campus, and is interested in hearing about the experiences of Queen’s community members from diverse backgrounds.

Gazette News

Photograph of a phone displaying the SeQure app

Sep 08, 2021

Screen yourself for COVID-19

Queen’s updates SeQure app to support faculty, staff, students, and others returning to campus for fall term.

Sep 07, 2021

Nearly 26,000 Queen's community members declare vaccination status

Overwhelming majority of employees and students are reporting full vaccination.

Malaysia’s Chew Wei Lun plays a shot during a gold medal Boccia match at the Tokyo Paralympic Games. Boccia is only one of three summer Paralympic sports where athletes can compete while using a powerchair. (AP Photo/Shuji Kajiyama)

Sep 07, 2021

After the Paralympics: Initiative to get more Canadians involved in power wheelchair sports

The Conversation: Within the parasport community itself, inclusivity and access is a real issue, especially for those who do not fit the mold of how we think an athlete “should” look or move.